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Re: [wpmac] Re: Gold Key

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  • RBRoufberg@aol.com
    ... Gold key Another modifier key, like command, option and control. Its default mapping is to the 5 and 7 keys on the keypad, but it can be set to
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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      In a message dated 10/3/05 12:25:49 AM, jrethorst@... writes:


      > --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, RBRoufberg@a... wrote:
      > >
      > ***** "Here"?   Where is "here"? Please give a link or URL.
      >
      > Files section of this group. Title is "Tips & Macros 2.0".
      >
      > ***** This is what I found in the files.

      Gold key Another modifier key, like command, option and control. Its
      default mapping is to the 5 and 7 keys on the keypad, but it can be set to
      anything, in Prefs > Keyboards. A great feature for an easy extra 50 or so keyboard
      equivalents.

      I don't understand the phrase "default mapping is to the 5 and 7 keys. . ."
      Can you give me an example of how to use Gold Key, for instance, to repair a
      typo such as switching the two letters in "wrnog" to "wrong."

      Thanks,
      Ruth R.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Rethorst
      ... wrong. Install this macro, naming it something like LetterSwitch: Raw Read (char;Left) Delete Right Left () Type Var (RawObject) Right () Display (On)
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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        --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, RBRoufberg@a... wrote:

        > I don't understand the phrase "default mapping is to the 5 and 7
        > keys. . ."
        > Can you give me an example of how to use Gold Key, for instance, to
        > repair a typo such as switching the two letters in "wrnog" to
        "wrong."

        Install this macro, naming it something like LetterSwitch:

        Raw Read (char;Left)
        Delete Right
        Left ()
        Type Var (RawObject)
        Right ()
        Display (On)

        Then go to Tools > Macro > Edit, scroll to and click on that macro,
        and click Assign, to give it a keystroke. You can assign any
        keystroke,
        using command/option/shift/control etc.

        To use a Gold key assignment, first
        check to see that Num Lock is off (so your numeric keypad can be
        used for navigation instead of typing numbers). Pressing Shift-Clear
        toggles Num Lock on and off; its status is shown in the Status bar
        at the bottom of the screen.

        In the Assign dialog,
        type 5 and then any other character, e.g. "s". The Assign dialog will
        show an outlined number 1 followed by the letter s in the Keystroke
        box; it wil show this as already assigned to the letter s. Don't worry
        about that; click Assign. Then click Done.

        Back in your document, after you've typed "wrno" your cursor will
        be just to the right of the o. Run this macro, with whatever
        keystroke, and it will switch the positions of o and n.

        The Gold key's default mapping to 7 and 5 might be inconvenient
        for anyone who uses the keypad to enter numbers (older keyboards
        didn't have as many navigational keys e.g. home and end, so WP
        let you use the keypad, after pressing Shift-Clear to turn Number
        Lock off. Pressing 5 and then 8 on the keypad took you to the top
        of the current page; pressing 5 twice and then 8 took you to the
        top of the document etc.

        These days, with more dedicated navigational keys, you might want
        to assign the Gold key to something else. Do this in Prefs >
        Keyboard. Scroll down to Gold key and assign it anything: I've
        assigned it command-Y.

        The beauty of this thing (if you're still with me) is that you can
        press command-Y and then any other key on your
        keyboard, for a keystroke equivalent to any WP command or any
        macro or style you've installed. With so many more keystrokes
        for commands, they're easier to assign mnemonically, so that
        even I can remember them.

        John R.
      • RBRoufberg@aol.com
        Whew! It s going to take me a while to figure this all out, but I didn t want to delay thanking you for such a thorough and prompt solution. Ruth R.
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 4, 2005
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          Whew! It's going to take me a while to figure this all out, but I didn't
          want to delay thanking you for such a thorough and prompt solution.

          Ruth R.
          ================================

          In a message dated 10/3/05 10:39:42 PM, jrethorst@... writes:

          > > Can you give me an example of how to use Gold Key, for instance, to
          > > repair a typo such as switching the two letters in "wrnog" to
          > "wrong."
          >
          > Install this macro, naming it something like LetterSwitch:
          >
          > Raw Read (char;Left)
          > Delete Right
          > Left ()
          > Type Var (RawObject)
          > Right ()
          > Display (On)
          >
          > Then go to Tools > Macro > Edit, scroll to and click on that macro,
          > and click Assign, to give it a keystroke. You can assign any
          > keystroke,
          > using command/option/shift/control etc.
          >
          > To use a Gold key assignment, first
          > check to see that Num Lock is off (so your numeric keypad can be
          > used for navigation instead of typing numbers). Pressing Shift-Clear
          > toggles Num Lock on and off; its status is shown in the Status bar
          > at the bottom of the screen.
          >
          > In the Assign dialog,
          > type 5 and then any other character, e.g. "s". The Assign dialog will
          > show an outlined number 1 followed by the letter s in the Keystroke
          > box; it wil show this as already assigned to the letter s. Don't worry
          > about that; click Assign. Then click Done.
          >
          > Back in your document, after you've typed "wrno" your cursor will
          > be just to the right of the o. Run this macro, with whatever
          > keystroke, and it will switch the positions of o and n.
          >
          > The Gold key's default mapping to 7 and 5 might be inconvenient
          > for anyone who uses the keypad to enter numbers (older keyboards
          > didn't have as many navigational keys e.g. home and end, so WP
          > let you use the keypad, after pressing  Shift-Clear to turn Number
          > Lock off. Pressing 5 and then 8 on the keypad took you to the top
          > of the current page; pressing 5 twice and then 8 took you to the
          > top of the document etc.
          >
          > These days, with more dedicated navigational  keys, you might want
          > to assign the Gold key to something else. Do this in Prefs >
          > Keyboard. Scroll down to Gold key and assign it anything: I've
          > assigned it command-Y.
          >
          > The beauty of this thing (if you're still with me) is that you can
          > press command-Y and then any other key on your
          > keyboard, for a keystroke equivalent to any WP command or any
          > macro or style you've installed. With so many more keystrokes
          > for commands, they're easier to assign mnemonically, so that
          > even I can remember them.
          >
          > John R.
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Rethorst
          ... You re most welcome. I should have organized my post better, to say it covered two independent things: the gold key, and the Letterswitch macro. This macro
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 4, 2005
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            --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, RBRoufberg@a... wrote:

            > Whew! It's going to take me a while to figure this all out, but I
            > didn't want to delay thanking you for such a thorough and
            > prompt solution.

            You're most welcome. I should have organized my post better, to say
            it covered two independent things: the gold key, and the Letterswitch
            macro. This macro is probably the one I use most often (and so have
            assigned it the F2 keystroke myself).

            John R.
          • Phillip Jones, C.E.T.
            What you are talking about can be done with TypeIt4Me. I had it in OS 9 and have it in OSX. what you do is each time you discover something like that highlight
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 4, 2005
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              What you are talking about can be done with TypeIt4Me.
              I had it in OS 9 and have it in OSX.

              what you do is each time you discover something like that highlight it
              and choose copy. the open TypeIt4Me and create new item paste in the
              title box then in the box below type the correct spelling save it.

              Then as soon as you type the mistake it automatically corrects according
              to what you typed.

              You can also use it to type something you want to repeat just by a
              couple of keys strokes.

              for example I can type Tiger and slash key / and it will type the below

              "PowerBook 17" with 2 GB system RAM, 1.67GHZ and OSX.4.2 and"

              I use this in the apple support newsgroup to identify me as using both:

              PowerBook 17" with 2 GB system RAM, 1.67GHZ and OSX.4.2 and a
              PowerPC G4-500 using OSX.3.9 1.5 GB system RAM and ATI Radeon 9000 video
              card.

              I uses it to correct n a d for and hte for the and other key reversals
              as well.

              John Rethorst wrote:
              > --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, RBRoufberg@a... wrote:
              >
              > > Whew! It's going to take me a while to figure this all out, but I
              > > didn't want to delay thanking you for such a thorough and
              > > prompt solution.
              >
              > You're most welcome. I should have organized my post better, to say
              > it covered two independent things: the gold key, and the Letterswitch
              > macro. This macro is probably the one I use most often (and so have
              > assigned it the F2 keystroke myself).
              >
              > John R.
            • Rick Albright
              Thanks to John for the Letterswitch macro. I had tried a slightly different version of this a few years ago (some of the macro commands were different), but
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 5, 2005
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                Thanks to John for the Letterswitch macro. I had tried a slightly
                different version of this a few years ago (some of the macro commands
                were different), but could never get it to work. I transpose letters
                constantly, and this is very handy. However, I wouldn't mind something
                that would work in other apps as well.

                Phillip, I know that TypeIt4Me can complete abbreviations, etc. Am I
                correct that this can work in any OSX application? I wasn't aware of
                the auto-correct feature. Can it be turned off, or applied selectively?
                I like being able to quickly untranspose letters, for example, with a
                keystroke (which John's macro does very well). But I really dislike
                auto-correct features as a rule because I'm often typing quotations in
                Middle English, or other texts with archaic or very irregular spelling,
                and auto-correct software is usually trying to change this as I go. I
                need to control this, but want to be able to run it quickly and easily
                as I need it.

                Thanks,
                Rick Albright
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