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Re: WP Windows is selling well again

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  • John Rethorst
    ... You re right, but I ve heard that MS exploited their position on the technical side too, as in a version of Windows wasn t ready to ship until it made WP
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25 6:01 PM
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      --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, John Kaufmann <kaufmann@n...
      wrote:

      > I have to take issue, though, with what IMHO is a
      > misleading take on the history of WP's demise: The issue
      > was less technical - who had the first GUI Windows word
      > processor than it was Microsoft's understanding of how to
      > exploit their Windows position to push their applications
      > software

      You're right, but I've heard that MS exploited their
      position on the technical side too, as in a version of
      Windows wasn't ready to ship until it made WP and Lotus
      crash. Just what I've heard, but a fascinating possibility.

      > Microsoft has always won by understanding that good
      > marketing - even if it means skirting the anti-trust laws
      > - beats good products.

      They've always had the best advertising I've ever seen. WP
      had some of the worst.

      I think WP was especially good at listening to its customers,
      and the depth of implementation of most features was better
      than the competition. One mistake WP made was not starting
      Windows development early and earnestly enough; another
      was in advertising. Reminded me of AT&T after the breakup:
      quality products, which they didn't know how to sell.

      The first WP Mac ad I remember had three guys all wearing
      that party-gag disguise with the mustache and bushy
      eyebrows glued on to the glasses rims, and the text gave
      the reader an address to write to (this was pre-web) for
      information on why he or she should use WP. The next ad I
      remember had a woman sitting on the floor, typing at a Mac
      that was also on the floor. Her hair style, makeup and clothes
      suggested she had a boyfriend who carried his Marlboros
      rolled up in the sleeve of his T-shirt and wore a baseball cap
      with a Budweiser logo. Nice people to be sure, but not the
      best examples for advertising a serious writing tool. In any
      case, the woman would not have been able to write for very
      long, there on the floor, without getting a sore back. And we
      must all remember the "used to play a tuba" ads, until WP
      stopped running them after complaints from players of that
      instrument.

      By contrast, MS advertising is superb. A memorable ad for
      Word showed three people on the steps of a public building.
      Their names mentioned in the text, and certain features of
      clothes and architecture, suggested northern Europe. The
      two older people clearly thought for a living, and were
      good at it. Their faces reflected depth and care. The
      younger person with them has not lived as they have, but
      his face showed intelligence, interest and seriousness of
      purpose. They of course used Word and the ad, rather than
      giving the reader an address to write to in order to learn
      why, articulately and persuasively explained why.

      WP may have been like AT&T in more ways than advertising.
      They got into the market early, made good products and
      became a household word. Then the market changed faster
      than the company realized.
    • Steve Kane
      ... It ain t done till Lotus won t run. was how I heard it. Apocryphal?
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 25 6:15 PM
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        On Apr 25, 2005, at 8:01 PM, John Rethorst wrote:

        > You're right, but I've heard that MS exploited their
        > position on the technical side too, as in a version of
        > Windows wasn't ready to ship until it made WP and Lotus
        > crash. Just what I've heard, but a fascinating possibility.

        "It ain't done till Lotus won't run." was how I heard it. Apocryphal?
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