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YOU CAN BE OF HELP

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  • Bayo Afolaranmi
    Dearly Beloved, YOU CAN BE OF HELP She said to her mistress, If only my master would see the prophet who is in Samaria! He would cure him of his leprosy (2
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 6, 2006
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      Dearly Beloved,

      YOU CAN BE OF HELP

      "She said to her mistress, 'If only my master would see the prophet who is
      in Samaria! He would cure him of his leprosy'" (2 Kings 5:3, NIV).

      The story of the life Naaman the commander of army of the king of Aram is
      not complete without the role of an Israelite slave girl that was his
      housemaid. Naaman was such a great man in the sight of his master because of
      his military prowess. The Bible says, "because through him the LORD had
      given victory to Aram. He was a valiant soldier, but he had leprosy" (2
      Kings 5:1, NIV). That last comment about him made this slave girl relevant
      in his life.

      Bands of the Aramian army had gone out sometime and captured an Israelite
      girl. She became a slave and maidservant to the wife of Naaman. No doubt,
      the girl had lost her self-worth, and only God knows the kind of treatment
      she had in the household of Naaman. However, this girl saw herself as a
      channel of help to the predicament of the head of the house, and she
      willingly offered the help. She told her mistress about the possibility of
      remedy to the predicament. In her captivity, she believed in the efficacy of
      the power of her God, and she wanted this power to be demonstrated in the
      life of her master. The master heeded to her advice "and his flesh was
      restored and became clean like that of a young boy" (2 Kings 5:14, NIV).

      An adage says, "Your neighbor is whoever you can help, help him." Jesus
      Christ buttressed this when an expert in the law wanted to know whom he
      could demonstrate his love to. Jesus told him a parable of a wounded man
      that a Samaritan helped and concluded that the "unloved and unwanted"
      Samaritan was the neighbor of the wounded Jews instead of the "pious" priest
      and Levite who refused to help (Luke 10:25-37).

      Who can you help today? Is the person hostile to you, or is he your
      perceived enemy? Are you helping the person? Even those that you love and
      are close to you, are you helping them? Do not say there is nothing you can
      do. You can be of help, even to your worst enemy. The Bible says, "If your
      enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink. In
      doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head" (Romans 12:20, NIV. See
      also Exodus 23:4-5; Deuteronomy 22:1-4; Proverbs 25:21-22; Matthew 5:44;
      Luke 6:27-28; 1 Thessalonians 5:15). Always think of ways in which you can
      be of help to people around you no matter the situation.

      In His service,

      Bayo Afolaranmi (Pastor).


      --
      "I eagerly expect and hope that I will in no way be ashamed, but will have
      sufficient courage so that now as always Christ will be exalted in my body,
      whether by life or by death. FOR TO ME, TO LIVE IS CHRIST AND TO DIE IS
      GAIN" (Philippians 1:20-21, NIV).


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