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Who wants WHAT (July ad)

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  • Mike Wolfberg
    Just released - WHAT now comes with a Collins lexicon for World competitions, and its OSPD4 lexicon has been updated to be usable for school Scrabble.
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 28, 2007
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      Just released - WHAT now comes with a Collins lexicon for World competitions, and its OSPD4 lexicon has been updated to be usable for school Scrabble.

      Wolfberg's Helpful Anagramming Tool is really a toolbox of many tools to help with anagramming and word study. You can get a complete answer or request partial info as hints, so you can work on your own puzzles. WHAT does rack postmortems, adjudicates challenges, makes study lists, supports exporting and printing, produces and administers flashcards in two different styles, plays Boggle, and does a lot more. Output can be sorted using several keys and can include hooks, unhooks, anagrams, definitions, etc. New OWL2 words can be shown with a special notation, such a suffix plus. Similarly, when using Collins, Collins-only words can be shown with your choice of a suffix.

      WHAT is easy to use for the most common queries, and it has considerable power to help you answer esoteric questions. It has a mode in which it operates the same as a popular hand-held electronic device which supports OSPD3.

      It comes with lexicons for OWL2, OSPD4 (useful for school Scrabble), CSW, and other older lexicons. It provides definitions from OSPD4 and OWL2 words up to length 8 (or OSPD3/TWL98).

      WHAT and someWHAT are approved by the NSA to handle challenge adjudications in tournaments. Even the free demo version, someWHAT, can adjudicate using the full lexicon.

      WHAT costs $19.95, which includes support, and you can install it on up to five computers.

      You can also try the free someWHAT, which comes with limited lexicons. All of its demo lexicons include all words shorter than length 7 plus all words with a Q. So this free version can help you study the new words up through length 6.

      Although there is essentially no on-line help yet, WHAT has extensive documentation, including many examples from simple to complex.
      See http://what.wolfberg.net for a lot more detail. Or just see the one-page manual at: http://wolfberg.net/what/doc/what_common_queries.html

      Thanks for you attention,


      - Mike

      P.S. Look for flyers and free someWHAT CDs at Dayton.
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