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RE: [woodheat] Digest Number 21

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  • John Gulland
    ... You haven t said what type of woodburner you are talking about. If it is a wood stove, you should not connect it to the furnace. If it is a wood
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 29, 2000
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      Jen wrote:
      > What we would like to do is to connect the woodburner to the ductwork
      > for the furnace, and have it heat our home additionally. The woodburner
      > has its own separate chimney. Does anyone know where I can find
      > information on what to do to connect the two - or do you have any
      > suggestions?
      >

      You haven't said what type of 'woodburner' you are talking about. If it is
      a wood stove, you should not connect it to the furnace. If it is a wood
      furnace, you should follow the manufacturer's instructions.

      Although the idea of connecting wood stoves to furnace duct work
      is one considered by many people who heat
      with wood, is among the more dangerous things you can try. It is
      specifically prohibited in building codes, and for good reason -- the hot
      backdrafting that can result can fill a house with smoke within minutes
      which is hazardous if it happens overnight. There is a brief note on this
      subject at the bottom of this page:
      http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/es/erb/reed/wood/04_e.html
      The same article does provide suggestions for the indirect use of furnace
      fans for gradual heat distribution. I use that system in my house and it
      works great.

      If you want a woodburning device that can be used as a forced air furnace,
      buy a forced air wood furnace. Space heaters are for heating spaces and
      must not be connected to circulation fans and duct systems.

      Regards,
      John Gulland
      The Wood Heat Organization Inc.
      www.woodheat.org
      A non-commercial service in support of responsible home heating with wood
    • Jen @ JEN'S USED BOOK DEN
      ... John, Thank you for directing me to the article... What he have exactly is an old Lennox coal furnace. It had a case around it at one time which was
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 29, 2000
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        > You haven't said what type of 'woodburner' you are talking about. If it is
        > a wood stove, you should not connect it to the furnace. If it is a wood
        > furnace, you should follow the manufacturer's instructions.
        >
        > Although the idea of connecting wood stoves to furnace duct work
        > is one considered by many people who heat
        > with wood, is among the more dangerous things you can try. It is
        > specifically prohibited in building codes, and for good reason -- the hot
        > backdrafting that can result can fill a house with smoke within minutes
        > which is hazardous if it happens overnight. There is a brief note on this
        > subject at the bottom of this page:
        > http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/es/erb/reed/wood/04_e.html
        > The same article does provide suggestions for the indirect use of furnace
        > fans for gradual heat distribution. I use that system in my house and it
        > works great.
        >
        > If you want a woodburning device that can be used as a forced air furnace,
        > buy a forced air wood furnace. Space heaters are for heating spaces and
        > must not be connected to circulation fans and duct systems.
        >
        > Regards,
        > John Gulland
        > The Wood Heat Organization Inc.
        > www.woodheat.org
        >
        >
        >

        John,
        Thank you for directing me to the article...
        What he have exactly is an old Lennox coal furnace. It had a case around it
        at one time which was removed - now looks like a pot-bellied stove. It has
        been used as a woodburner for 20 years or so without a problem.
        When you say to use the furnace fan for heat distribution - I'm not sure how
        to go about doing this. We thought about making some type of shield or dome
        which would capture the heat into a duct which connects to the furnace
        ductwork. And this would be distributed to the entire house by using a separate
        thermostat or blower working on a timer. Does this sound OK? It would not be
        attached to the 'woodburner' physically - only from a distance over the top.

        Jen
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