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  • Milkweed Gardener
    Anyone worry about operating the dryer or bathroom vent while having a fire going in their wood burning stove/insert?
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 11
      Anyone worry about operating the dryer or bathroom vent while having a fire going in their wood burning stove/insert?
    • John Gulland
      Milkweed Gardiner wrote: Anyone worry about operating the dryer or bathroom vent while having a fire going in their wood burning stove/insert? I m assuming
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 11
        Milkweed Gardiner wrote:
        "Anyone worry about operating the dryer or bathroom vent while having a fire going in their wood burning stove/insert?"
         
        I'm assuming the potential worry is about house depressurization affecting the operation of the stove. According to the research done in Canada, there is no reason to worry about a dryer or bathroom fan affecting your stove. Even the most tightly sealed house will leak enough to provide air for combustion and for small exhaust flows.
         
        Here are the ranges of actual airflow in cubic feet per minute from typical exhaust devices:
        Bathroom fan 30 - 60
        Range exh. 80 - 120
        High output range exh. 200 - 600
        Clothes dryer 80 - 150
        Central vacuum 50 - 120
        (The table is from a slide in a presentation I give to hearth professionals)
         
        Note that these figures are normaly far below the nameplate rating of such devices. It is normal for exhaust devices to have poorly designed vent systems using flex duct with lots of length and turns. For comparison, a modern wood stove consumes between 10 and 25 cfm of air in normal operation.
         
        The fans that justify the most worry are high output range exhausts, some of which are huge. I have seen such fans that are powerful enough to cause vening problems in combustion equipment. Oddly enough, considering that I've been giving presentations on successful venting for 25 years and am well-known in Canada and the US for that work, the worst backdraft problem I ever saw was of an oil furnace and water heater. The first evidence that something was wrong was that the husband came in the kitchen when the woman was cooking and noticed that she had black soot marks on her upper lip.
         
        Anyhow, worries about house depressurization have led to all sorts of regulations for outdoor air supplies. But all the available research confirms that outdoor air supplies don't prevent backdrafting due to depressurization. In Canada, where most of this research was done, removed all rules for outdoor air supplies for wood heaters back in 2000 and there has been no outbreak of backdrafting.
         
        You might review our section on outdoor air supplies:
        John
      • samiamrd
        In my house, I have done a lot of insulation upgrades, along with new windows/doors, and air sealing. The combination of the standard 70 ccf bathroom exhaust
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 11

          In my house, I have done a lot of insulation upgrades, along with new windows/doors, and air sealing.  The combination of the standard 70 ccf bathroom exhaust fan and/or the gas dryer do not cause enough house depressurization to create a back draft in my wood stove.   


          There has only been one instance where hot backdraft has happened.  The only thing that can make the stove backdraft is our whole house fan.  Its a 2 ft high speed fan which goes to the attic space.  This fan pulls about 4500 ccf/min. This is the only fan which can backdraft my wood stove.  To prevent this from happening, I lock out the fan operation at the start of the heating season until heating season is over.   If you have one of these, then it might be a good idea to lock them out when your burning the wood stove. 


          Have a good day..

        • Director, MIT, Aurangabad
          On Wed, Apr 12, 2017 at 4:03 AM, nedn46@gmail.com [woodheat]
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 11


            On Wed, Apr 12, 2017 at 4:03 AM, nedn46@... [woodheat] <woodheat@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
            BoxbeThis message is eligible for Automatic Cleanup! (woodheat@yahoogroups.com) Add cleanup rule | More info

             

            In my house, I have done a lot of insulation upgrades, along with new windows/doors, and air sealing.  The combination of the standard 70 ccf bathroom exhaust fan and/or the gas dryer do not cause enough house depressurization to create a back draft in my wood stove.   


            There has only been one instance where hot backdraft has happened.  The only thing that can make the stove backdraft is our whole house fan.  Its a 2 ft high speed fan which goes to the attic space.  This fan pulls about 4500 ccf/min. This is the only fan which can backdraft my wood stove.  To prevent this from happening, I lock out the fan operation at the start of the heating season until heating season is over.   If you have one of these, then it might be a good idea to lock them out when your burning the wood stove. 


            Have a good day..



          • milkweed.gardener
            Thanks samiamrd and John Gulland, back when I was having trouble with smoke roll out, I had read in the manual about its caution with depressurization... so
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 14
              Thanks samiamrd and John Gulland,
              back when I was having trouble with smoke roll out, I had read in the manual about its caution with depressurization... so until I figured out the issue with the smoke roll out I just made it a practice that if my wife wanted to use the dryer I would first let the fire burn out. Since smoke roll out is no longer an issue for me I've just been continuing to burn out the fire before using the dryer, this gives me the confidence to not to worry about it anymore.
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