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I tried again, and I hate pine.

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  • samiamrd
    I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing. I thought that I had it this time. I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 24, 2017

      I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing.  I thought that I had it this time.  I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the best wood, but it was free.  I cut it and split it down to proper size.  I then racked it and let it dry all summer as if it was a normal piece of ash or maple.  This winter between December and Mid February, I used it in the wood insert for day time fires.  It burned fast and put out enough heat for this mild winter.  Come mid February, I noticed that smoke started to roll out of my stove, so I knew that it was time to go and clean the SS flexible liner.  When I looked down the liner, there was the dry flaky creosote which was starting to build up.  I cleaned the liner in December and this build up was over the last two months.  Clearly, my technique( both drying and firing for pine) was wrong.  


      It is not a disaster, because the wood provided free heat, but I still need to be careful when burning pine with my insert and chimney liner.  It also suggests that the when using poor quality wood, I need to keep watching the chimney and clean it 2 times during the winter.  It is probably better if I just avoid the pine until I can do a better job with it. 


      Still learning how to burn wood in NY....


              

    • Dana Hill
      I doubt the buildup has anything to do with the species. Perhaps it just wasn’t dry enough, as you’ve suggested. Plenty of people burn nothing but soft
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 24, 2017
        I doubt the buildup has anything to do with the species. Perhaps it just wasn’t dry enough, as you’ve suggested. Plenty of people burn nothing but soft wood, and it works out fine. As you say, it does produce good, quick heat!  

        On Feb 24, 2017, at 9:00 AM, nedn46@... [woodheat] <woodheat@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing.  I thought that I had it this time.  I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the best wood, but it was free.  I cut it and split it down to proper size.  I then racked it and let it dry all summer as if it was a normal piece of ash or maple.  This winter between December and Mid February, I used it in the wood insert for day time fires.  It burned fast and put out enough heat for this mild winter.  Come mid February, I noticed that smoke started to roll out of my stove, so I knew that it was time to go and clean the SS flexible liner.  When I looked down the liner, there was the dry flaky creosote which was starting to build up.  I cleaned the liner in December and this build up was over the last two months.  Clearly, my technique( both drying and firing for pine) was wrong.  


        It is not a disaster, because the wood provided free heat, but I still need to be careful when burning pine with my insert and chimney liner.  It also suggests that the when using poor quality wood, I need to keep watching the chimney and clean it 2 times during the winter.  It is probably better if I just avoid the pine until I can do a better job with it. 


        Still learning how to burn wood in NY....


                


      • gggGary
        I have a small 50 year old planted pine woods and need to cut the dead standing out when it has or will fall on the fence. I usually buck it up and give it
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 24, 2017

          I have a small 50 year old planted pine woods and need to cut the dead standing out when it has or will fall on the fence.  I usually buck it up and give it away on CL but burn some now and then.  Get the fire going good, leave the intake air open and control how hot it gets by adding wood a couple chunks at a time.  Best when you are doing "stuff" at home, LOL I don't worry much about a bit of light fluffy creosote, it continuously sheds and falls back to the stove.   But yes IMHO pine is more likely to create build up.


          On 2/24/2017 8:33 AM, Dana Hill dana.hill@... [woodheat] wrote:
           

          I doubt the buildup has anything to do with the species. Perhaps it just wasn’t dry enough, as you’ve suggested. Plenty of people burn nothing but soft wood, and it works out fine. As you say, it does produce good, quick heat!  


          On Feb 24, 2017, at 9:00 AM, nedn46@... [woodheat] <woodheat@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing.  I thought that I had it this time.  I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the best wood, but it was free.  I cut it and split it down to proper size.  I then racked it and let it dry all summer as if it was a normal piece of ash or maple.  This winter between December and Mid February, I used it in the wood insert for day time fires.  It burned fast and put out enough heat for this mild winter.  Come mid February, I noticed that smoke started to roll out of my stove, so I knew that it was time to go and clean the SS flexible liner.  When I looked down the liner, there was the dry flaky creosote which was starting to build up.  I cleaned the liner in December and this build up was over the last two months.  Clearly, my technique( both drying and firing for pine) was wrong.  


          It is not a disaster, because the wood provided free heat, but I still need to be careful when burning pine with my insert and chimney liner.  It also suggests that the when using poor quality wood, I need to keep watching the chimney and clean it 2 times during the winter.  It is probably better if I just avoid the pine until I can do a better job with it. 


          Still learning how to burn wood in NY....


                  



        • 56ktf6opxx4txtysxbdvp47zkpwck5g7dyn2itnt
          Good Morning. Just a note based on my experiences: Horizontal runs in chimneys will require more regular cleanings. Bob ... [1]
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 24, 2017

            Good Morning.  Just a note based on my experiences: Horizontal runs in chimneys will require more regular cleanings.  Bob

             

             

            On 2017-02-24 07:45, gggGary yahoogroups@... [woodheat] wrote:

             

             

            I have a small 50 year old planted pine woods and need to cut the dead standing out when it has or will fall on the fence.  I usually buck it up and give it away on CL but burn some now and then.  Get the fire going good, leave the intake air open and control how hot it gets by adding wood a couple chunks at a time.  Best when you are doing "stuff" at home, LOL I don't worry much about a bit of light fluffy creosote, it continuously sheds and falls back to the stove.   But yes IMHO pine is more likely to create build up.


            On 2/24/2017 8:33 AM, Dana Hill dana.hill@... [woodheat] wrote:
             

            I doubt the buildup has anything to do with the species. Perhaps it just wasn't dry enough, as you've suggested. Plenty of people burn nothing but soft wood, and it works out fine. As you say, it does produce good, quick heat!  


            On Feb 24, 2017, at 9:00 AM, nedn46@... [woodheat] <woodheat@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
             

            I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing.  I thought that I had it this time.  I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the best wood, but it was free.  I cut it and split it down to proper size.  I then racked it and let it dry all summer as if it was a normal piece of ash or maple.  This winter between December and Mid February, I used it in the wood insert for day time fires.  It burned fast and put out enough heat for this mild winter.  Come mid February, I noticed that smoke started to roll out of my stove, so I knew that it was time to go and clean the SS flexible liner.  When I looked down the liner, there was the dry flaky creosote which was starting to build up.  I cleaned the liner in December and this build up was over the last two months.  Clearly, my technique( both drying and firing for pine) was wrong.  

             

            It is not a disaster, because the wood provided free heat, but I still need to be careful when burning pine with my insert and chimney liner.  It also suggests that the when using poor quality wood, I need to keep watching the chimney and clean it 2 times during the winter.  It is probably better if I just avoid the pine until I can do a better job with it. 

             

            Still learning how to burn wood in NY....

             

                    
             
          • timothydj
            I had the same problem with pine and small, cool fires a long time ago. I made hotter fires and that helped a lot. Now I have a nicer EPA stove now and I
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 26, 2017
              I had the same problem with pine and small, cool fires a long time ago. I made hotter fires and that helped a lot.

              Now I have a nicer EPA stove now and I haven't had any problems. I burn more hardwood too and the pine is done with a hot stove.

              I use pine for kindling all the time and I seem to be doing OK. The only build-up I find is on the cap which isn't a big deal.
            • samiamrd
              Good morning, With the ash and maple, cutting and racking by May of the year, I can have the wood dry enough for burning by fall. If ash and maple are used, I
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 26, 2017

                Good morning,


                With the ash and maple, cutting and racking by May of the year, I can have the wood dry enough for burning by fall.  If ash and maple are used, I could go the entire winter without cleaning the SS chimney liner.  But the Pine, is a completely different animal.  I will have to try again, but with more science behind it. 

              • timothydj
                Tempting as it is I don t start my cold stove off with pine. But, after it good and hot I ve used anything with no problem. ... I have a small 50 year old
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 11, 2017
                  Tempting as it is I don't start my cold stove off with pine. 

                  But, after it good and hot I've used anything with no problem.


                  ---In woodheat@yahoogroups.com, <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

                  I have a small 50 year old planted pine woods and need to cut the dead standing out when it has or will fall on the fence.  I usually buck it up and give it away on CL but burn some now and then.  Get the fire going good, leave the intake air open and control how hot it gets by adding wood a couple chunks at a time.  Best when you are doing "stuff" at home, LOL I don't worry much about a bit of light fluffy creosote, it continuously sheds and falls back to the stove.   But yes IMHO pine is more likely to create build up.


                  On 2/24/2017 8:33 AM, Dana Hill dana.hill@... [woodheat] wrote:
                   

                  I doubt the buildup has anything to do with the species. Perhaps it just wasn’t dry enough, as you’ve suggested. Plenty of people burn nothing but soft wood, and it works out fine. As you say, it does produce good, quick heat!  


                  On Feb 24, 2017, at 9:00 AM, nedn46@... [woodheat] <woodheat@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  I understand that the use of pine in a wood stove comes down to processing.  I thought that I had it this time.  I was given standing dead pine. Great, not the best wood, but it was free.  I cut it and split it down to proper size.  I then racked it and let it dry all summer as if it was a normal piece of ash or maple.  This winter between December and Mid February, I used it in the wood insert for day time fires.  It burned fast and put out enough heat for this mild winter.  Come mid February, I noticed that smoke started to roll out of my stove, so I knew that it was time to go and clean the SS flexible liner.  When I looked down the liner, there was the dry flaky creosote which was starting to build up.  I cleaned the liner in December and this build up was over the last two months.  Clearly, my technique( both drying and firing for pine) was wrong.  


                  It is not a disaster, because the wood provided free heat, but I still need to be careful when burning pine with my insert and chimney liner.  It also suggests that the when using poor quality wood, I need to keep watching the chimney and clean it 2 times during the winter.  It is probably better if I just avoid the pine until I can do a better job with it. 


                  Still learning how to burn wood in NY....


                          



                • milkweed.gardener
                  nedn46 mailto:nedn46@..., did or do you use a moisture meter?
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 23, 2017
                     nedn46, did or do you use a moisture meter?

                  • samiamrd
                    It is not that pine is bad, in and of itself. It was dry(not wet if split again). The issue is that when burning, and when air control is used too much, it
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 24, 2017

                      It is not that pine is bad, in and of itself.  It was dry(not wet if split again).  The issue is that when burning, and when air control is used too much, it seems to promote more buildup in my chimney liner, than with other wood species.   I think that I could burn it without as much air control, however, I don't want flames shooting up my liner.  I understand that the SS liner is designed to handle a hot burn, but I don't want to go there.  Hence I turn the air down too much to achieve better control.  So the issue is with my technique in my house. 


                      Outside in the BarBQue, Pine is ok.  But given that I have to put in the same effort to achieve the same max volume of wood in the storage racks, I kind of loose potential heat by drying pine instead of maple or ash.  Since I have to clean the chimney more often when burning pine, I really decided that I don't like it.  Things might have been better if my wood insert could have followed the 10 steps to perfection(http://www.woodheat.org/10-steps.html ), but unfortunately I do have some compromises in order to make this system work within the 1957 house design.  Maybe in the next house, I will be able to build the system righter...


                      Have a good day.       

                    • milkweed.gardener
                      ... By turning down your air control, is your fire less hot then? If your exhaust is less hot, then more chance of particles cooling on the way up and not
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 25, 2017
                        Hence I turn the air down too much to achieve better control.
                        > So the issue is with my technique in my house. 

                        By turning down your air control, is your fire less hot then?
                        If your exhaust is less hot, then more chance of particles cooling on the way up and not making it out of the flue. It seems to me that might be an explanation for the buildup in the flue when burning pine.

                        I consider myself a novice still. One thing that helped me with keeping the fire going is to use a infrared thermometer. Once I get the insert to the desired temperature that seems to work best for my setup, then I manipulate the air control to keep the insert temperature there. I have not seen any more build up of creosote based on species burned as a result. -- before using the infrared thermometer, a lot of my fires would cool off, and noticed a lot of white fluffy stuff hanging on the inside of the liner as a result.
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