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Re: [woodheat] Re: Sawing small branches and sticks

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  • Ken Meinken
    Interesting. Yes, that looks like a safer alternative if it works well. A google search shows that Amazon, Sears and Lowes handles it. Ken
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 18, 2012
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      Interesting.  Yes, that looks like a safer alternative if it works well.   A google search shows that Amazon, Sears and Lowes handles it.

      Ken

      On Feb 18, 2012, at 1:15 PM, Nancy Carleton wrote:

      We had several large (mostly dead) oaks taken down in our yard and my DH is doing the cleanup and turning it all into firewood for our EPA-certified fireplace insert.  Our daughter decided to make the job easier for him with a birthday gift of a Worx JawSaw.  It's an electric chain saw (6" bar) tucked into a fixed  jaw affair that can handle up to 4" dia. branches.  The whole thing weighs just under 11 1/2 lbs. and has an extension arm so you can use it to trim standing trees or bushes. You position the jaws around the branch, and the bar moves to grab and cut. Both DH and daughter have been delighted by its ease of use, and relative safety (vs. the regular chain saw). I have no idea where she got it (likely shopped online) or how much it cost, nor anything about expected product life, or parts availability. But for now it looks like a fantastic time saver for anyone converting the branches of a downed tree into useful kindling.

      If anyone on this list has any experience with this product, I'd be interested to know what you've learned.

    • BRIAN POLIKOWSKY
      Th Jaws one is on my wish list....... we just had to replace our  chain saw so not in the budget for now but maybe someday....... I saw them in
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 18, 2012
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        Th Jaws one is on my wish list....... we just had to replace our  chain saw so not in the budget for now but maybe someday.......
        I saw them in an infomercial by the way.
         
        Alex Polikowsky
         
         
         


      • nedn46@gmail.com
        If I was to do this, I would exchange the triple wall for a class a insulated chimney. In a chase it may keep the flue gasses higher and give a little better
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 18, 2012
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          If I was to do this, I would exchange the triple wall for a class a insulated chimney. In a chase it may keep the flue gasses higher and give a little better protection in the case of a chimney fire. The other thing that I like about the full refit listed below is that when you are done, you know exactly how it is built.

          Good luck,

          Sam

          --- In woodheat@yahoogroups.com, Steve Nadramia <snad5393@...> wrote:
          >
          > I had a similar situation with my house when I bought it.  My solution was to completely remove the ZC woodburning stove and its pipe (double wall)
          > which was enclosed in a sheetrock chase in my living room.  I replaced the old pipe with triple wall inside the chase and where the old metal fireplace was located I did some re-framing and tile work and built a hearth for my new wood stove.  Now it is an attractive traditional wood stove set up.  My calculations at the time were that it was roughly the same price as a specialized insert and would provide better heat and a simpler system.
          > Good luck.
          > Steve
          >
        • Ken Meinken
          ... I was thinking exactly the same thing. Keeping the flue warmer will reduce creosote and also probably improve the draft. Ken
          Message 4 of 29 , Feb 18, 2012
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            On Feb 18, 2012, at 4:00 PM, nedn46@... wrote:

            > If I was to do this, I would exchange the triple wall for a class a insulated chimney. In a chase it may keep the flue gasses higher and give a little better protection in the case of a chimney fire.


            I was thinking exactly the same thing.

            Keeping the flue warmer will reduce creosote and also probably improve the draft.

            Ken
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