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Re: which stove?

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  • Harry Bryant
    I too appreciate the input from the group. It has certainly help crystalize my decision on what to upgrade to. Now I need to zero in on the approriate size
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 1, 2009
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      I too appreciate the input from the group. It has certainly help
      crystalize my decision on what to upgrade to. Now I need to zero in
      on the approriate size for our cabin which is an open floor plan open
      to the roof over the main room with lofts on either side over the
      bedrooms and kitchen. If the stove specs say a stove will heat 1200
      square feet, I'll probably have to increase the size by 50% to
      account for the open space. Too bad they don't include a spec for the
      third dimension.

      Bill, I'm looking for a used stove to put in my wifes greenhouse. I
      have a little box stove in there now and it is helping cut propane
      usage but just doesn't put enough heat out for the size of the
      building, most goes out the pipe. If you are serious about your old
      Fisher I might be interested. How far would you be from Knoxville,
      TN area?

      Thanks to all,
      Harry

      --- In woodheat@yahoogroups.com, Bill Jackson <wjackson@...> wrote:
      >
      > I appreciate the comments and responses...keep'em coming please. I
      > apologize if I shouldn't have mentioned specific manufacturers but
      that
      > is a big part of what I need to decide. It is good to know that my
      > expectations of a 12 hour burn are not realistic. I was basing that
      on
      > manufacturers literature and specifications.
      >
      > Relative to the location I'm kind of stuck with doing the basement
      > install. There had been a previous install in the basement of a
      > woodstove, an old Fischer Papa I think...anybody want one? I have
      an
      > existing brick hearth and chimney in that location. The good thing
      is
      > that the chimney and hearth are located close to the center of the
      house
      > and there had been some floor vents already installed. I had been
      > already been thinking of doing a larger floor vent directly above
      the
      > stove which is below our family room. Are there any recommend floor
      vent
      > companies, sources or manufacturers? I hadn't started looking for
      that
      > yet. Thanks again for all of the replies.
      > Bill Jackson
      > PS- Have a Happy New Year
      >
      > Rock wrote:
      > >
      > > Thats what I would do, a coming and a going.
      > > The going being a floor vent cut the farthest from the stove that
      I
      > > can get it/with a duct extending down about to 24" from the floor.
      > > The hot air is not going to push it's way down the pipe, but as
      the
      > > warm air fills the room it will move the heavier colder air,
      towards
      > > the floor vent setting up a natural loop.
      > > Rock
      > >
      > > > After a couple of years I "bit the bullet" and cut a hole in the
      > > > floor and ran a duct from the stove to a register above. Wow!
      What
      > > > a difference!!!! And it used a lot less wood! It even did a good
      > > > job of heating the upstairs without needing the blower to come
      on 90%
      > > > of the time.
      > > > Ken
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------------------------------------
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      > >
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      > >
      > >
      >
    • Ken Meinken
      A ceiling fan would probably be a tremendous help in helping to maintain more even heat in your situation. Square footage numbers are just relative guides (at
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 1, 2009
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        A ceiling fan would probably be a tremendous help in helping to
        maintain more even heat in your situation.

        Square footage numbers are just relative guides (at best). Obviously
        a lot depends on whether you live in Alabama or the Yukon ;-)
        Probably even a big difference between northern Ohio and southern Ohio.

        Ken

        On Jan 1, 2009, at 11:55 AM, Harry Bryant wrote:
        > I too appreciate the input from the group. It has certainly help
        > crystalize my decision on what to upgrade to. Now I need to zero in
        > on the approriate size for our cabin which is an open floor plan open
        > to the roof over the main room with lofts on either side over the
        > bedrooms and kitchen. If the stove specs say a stove will heat 1200
        > square feet, I'll probably have to increase the size by 50% to
        > account for the open space. Too bad they don't include a spec for the
        > third dimension.
      • Bryden F. Dow
        The spec for the 3rd dimension is 8 feet, the standard distance from floor to ceiling. For other ceiling heights, you have to do the math. (I had this issue
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 1, 2009
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          The spec for the 3rd dimension is 8 feet, the standard distance from
          floor to ceiling. For other ceiling heights, you have to do the math.
          (I had this issue with a cathedral ceiling in a master bedroom.)

          Ken Meinken wrote:
          >
          > A ceiling fan would probably be a tremendous help in helping to
          > maintain more even heat in your situation.
          >
          > Square footage numbers are just relative guides (at best). Obviously
          > a lot depends on whether you live in Alabama or the Yukon ;-)
          > Probably even a big difference between northern Ohio and southern Ohio.
          >
          > Ken
          >
          > On Jan 1, 2009, at 11:55 AM, Harry Bryant wrote:
          > > I too appreciate the input from the group. It has certainly help
          > > crystalize my decision on what to upgrade to. Now I need to zero in
          > > on the approriate size for our cabin which is an open floor plan open
          > > to the roof over the main room with lofts on either side over the
          > > bedrooms and kitchen. If the stove specs say a stove will heat 1200
          > > square feet, I'll probably have to increase the size by 50% to
          > > account for the open space. Too bad they don't include a spec for the
          > > third dimension.
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ken Meinken
          Well yes, BUT there is no heat loss for inside air, e.g. 30x50x8 will have a lot more outside exposure (and heat loss) than 30x25x16 (the same volume, but less
          Message 4 of 26 , Jan 1, 2009
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            Well yes, BUT there is no heat loss for inside air, e.g. 30x50x8 will
            have a lot more outside exposure (and heat loss) than 30x25x16 (the
            same volume, but less exposed to the outside).

            Ken

            On Jan 1, 2009, at 1:15 PM, Bryden F. Dow wrote:
            > The spec for the 3rd dimension is 8 feet, the standard distance from
            > floor to ceiling. For other ceiling heights, you have to do the math.
            > (I had this issue with a cathedral ceiling in a master bedroom.)
            >
            > Ken Meinken wrote:
            >>
            >> A ceiling fan would probably be a tremendous help in helping to
            >> maintain more even heat in your situation.
            >>
            >> Square footage numbers are just relative guides (at best). Obviously
            >> a lot depends on whether you live in Alabama or the Yukon ;-)
            >> Probably even a big difference between northern Ohio and southern
            >> Ohio.
            >>
            >> Ken
            >>
            >> On Jan 1, 2009, at 11:55 AM, Harry Bryant wrote:
            >>> I too appreciate the input from the group. It has certainly help
            >>> crystalize my decision on what to upgrade to. Now I need to zero in
            >>> on the approriate size for our cabin which is an open floor plan
            >>> open
            >>> to the roof over the main room with lofts on either side over the
            >>> bedrooms and kitchen. If the stove specs say a stove will heat 1200
            >>> square feet, I'll probably have to increase the size by 50% to
            >>> account for the open space. Too bad they don't include a spec for
            >>> the
            >>> third dimension.
            >>
            >>
            >
          • Rock
            No one will they are all going on hearsay Firestops between wall for ballon framing were the norm, because you can feed a fire 3 stories high with air before
            Message 5 of 26 , Jan 2, 2009
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              No one will they are all going on hearsay

              Firestops between wall for ballon framing were the norm, because you
              can feed a fire 3 stories high with air before anyone knows about it
              (burn through to the interior).
              The electrical and plumbing penetrations spoken of are for inside of
              the stud bays.
              Rock
              --- In woodheat@yahoogroups.com, <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ken; Show me the code that says you can't have open floor vents.
              I have
              > made this challenge before, so far no one has been able to show me code
              > against it. If no floor vents were allowed then open stair cases
              would be
              > illegal also or two story vestibules. Get into multi family
              housing where
              > furnace or boiler rooms are required you might be able to make a
              case. Even
              > there, fireplaces and open stairways are allowed so...
              >
              >
              >
              > gggGary
              >
              > from Wisconsin
              >
              > That is probably a violation of building codes unless you get a
              > register with a fusible link that closes in case of a fire. I
              > really recommend a wood furnace which you can vent directly upstairs
              > (and direct some of the heat downstairs if you want.) The house will
              > be much more comfortable.
              >
              > Many people are afraid of pipes in the basement freezing without
              > heat. That is not likely to happen for two reasons: 1) the
              > basement is below ground which stays above freezing (normal below
              > ground temperature is in the 40-50 degree range for most of the
              > country, even in the coldest weather. 2) Some heat will sink into
              > the basement from the living space above. It won't be 70 degrees,
              > but it's likely to be at least 55 or 60. Most houses with
              > conventional furnaces (e.g. gas, electric, or oil) do not provide
              > direct heat to the basement.
              >
              > Ken
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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