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RE: [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection

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  • John Rushton
    Hi Bill, Thank you for your comprehensive summation of the virtues of Access/Excel. I appreciate your time and effort. I have just tried to insert an image to
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 12, 2013

      Hi Bill,

       

      Thank you for your comprehensive summation of the virtues of Access/Excel. I appreciate your time and effort.

       

      I have just tried to insert an image to an Excel page and it seems quite straight forward. With the desired cell selected one just has to click on ‘Insert’, then ‘Picture’, and then choose the file of the chosen image from the Windows Explorer pane that appears. It is then coped to the chosen cell as an image, not a link. The image is then expandable to whatever size one wishes.  I don’t see why it will not respond as a normal cell for sorting purposes.  I will give it a more prolonged trial when time permits.

       

      Thank you once again.

      John

       

      From: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com [mailto:woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Riley
      Sent: 12 February 2013 13:59
      To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection

       

       

      John,
      Excel would be a good choice for camera inventory except for the fact that you cannot include pictures associated with a row of cells.  You can insert pictures into the worksheet but it will not stay with the role of cells when you do things like sort and rearrange in different reports.


      You can also insert a pointer to a picture link on your hard drive but that doesn't display with the report.

       

      I struggled with using Excel, really wanting to make it work.  But, it just didn't meet my needs because of the pictures -- I wanted to display a picture with the information for each item.  In addition, I needed to have the picture stay associated with the information when I sorted all of the items.

       

      I finally bit the bullet and built an Access database that associated photos of my camera and other items with the data for each camera.

      There are three parts to access:

      1.  The database of records which is fairly easy to set up in a spreadsheet form.

      2.  The user input form which is not necessarily required.  I created a user input form but rarely use it.  I prefer to just go to the database spreadsheet form and enter the data there.

      3.   The report form is why you create a database.  That is where I recommend you spending most of your effort.

       

      One more limitation with Excel is that you can only enter a maximum of 255 characters within a single cell.   I found that too limiting for the description field in my records.  That was true on earlier versions.  The cell size limitation may have changed in newer versions of Excel.

      My experience was with an earlier version of Access ... years ago. I understand that the newer versions of Access have many good wizards that help you through the process of creating a database.

      Your solution?

      It all depends upon your needs. If you need a ledger without photos and a verbose description then an Excel spreadsheet would be great.


      If, like me, you want photos, more detailed descriptions, and perhaps sophisticated reporting, Access may be your solution.


      All the best, 

      Bill


      On Feb 12, 2013, at 6:10 AM, "John Rushton" <jcr_cameras@...> wrote:

       

      Hi Larry, Charles and All,

      Would Microsoft Excel be equally good for making a camera inventory? This
      would get around another learning curve for MS Access.

      Best Wishes,
      John

      ________________


      No virus found in this message.
      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6098 - Release Date: 02/11/13

    • Larry S. Pierce
      As far as entering the data, it would. But as far as displaying, ordering, and using the data, it would not. Each row in Excell is very much the same as a
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 12, 2013
        As far as entering the data, it would. But as far as displaying,
        ordering, and using the data, it would not. Each row in Excell is very
        much the same as a data record in Access. In fact, you can translate
        back and forth between Excell and Access in that way.

        Here are the things that I use Access for that Excell cannot do:

        -display a photo or photos of the object while looking at its data
        -look at only Anthony (or any other manufacturer) cameras
        -view stereocards on the computer in stereo
        -for each collection item, by entering a short acronym, to have the
        entire company name and address and other company data instantly
        associated with it, because company data is stored in another table
        (e.g., all I enter is "ao" and the computer knows that it is American
        Optical Co., Scovill Mfg. Co. proprietors, address, founding date,
        ending date, etc.)
        -(related to the last one) always have a company name (camera model
        name, any other repetitively entered data) be the same each time, rather
        than how you thought to enter it that day (Excell's autofill feature
        helps with this)
        -produce canned lists, e.g., "cameras not photographed yet", or "cameras
        made prior to 1900", or "Scovill cameras made prior to 1900", or
        "cameras without a lens (or an original case)" (to look for potential
        matches if I am buying a lens or a camera-less case).

        Currently, my collection database only links two tables: a "collection
        items" table to a "manufacturer" table. I was going to link in a
        "models" table to "collection items" which would bring in the beginning
        and ending dates when each model was made, but it would only be
        worthwhile if I had lots of the same model (like a Leica collection
        maybe) so I abandoned it.

        If you have an Excell spread sheet that contains your data, import it
        into Access. Then choose <new form> and choose the form wizard to make
        a form from the resulting table. Done. The rest is making it look like
        you want (or adding in the Manufacturer's table for repetitive entries).



        On 2/12/2013 4:10 AM, John Rushton wrote:
        > Hi Larry, Charles and All,
        >
        > Would Microsoft Excel be equally good for making a camera inventory? This
        > would get around another learning curve for MS Access.
        >
        > Best Wishes,
        > John
        >
        > ________________
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
        > [mailto:woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>] On
        > Behalf Of Larry S. Pierce
        > Sent: 12 February 2013 03:43
        > To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: Re: [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection [1
        > Attachment]
        >
        > I also use a custom MSAccess database. It is not very difficult to learn
        > enough to make up a database and form. Attached is my screenshot.
        > Cameras, catalogs, other accessories get tracked. The other half of the
        > story is having tie-on tags or markings on each piece so that items that
        > have a history together stay forever linked. For instance, the camera
        > pictured in my example would have six pieces marked: the case, the camera
        > body, the lensboard, the plateholder, the clip-off back, and the ground
        > glass frame that pulls out of the clip-off back.
        >
        > On 2/10/2013 9:48 AM, Rob Niederman wrote:
        > > I use a database program such as Microsoft Access. It's a bit more
        > > work to set up, but you can do data sorts & searches, price value
        > > totals, and so forth. Here is a screenshot of my entry template for
        > > cameras (that's all I track); but you can also add links to pictures
        > > and adapt it for anything acquired. - Rob
        > >
        > > *From:*J. Charles [mailto:steamer369@...
        > <mailto:steamer369%40yahoo.com>]
        > > *Sent:* Saturday, February 09, 2013 11:37 PM
        > > *To:* woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > *Subject:* [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection
        > >
        > > Hi All,
        > > As my collection keeps growing, I need help finding an efficient way
        > > of keeping track of my purchases, pictures, references before I forget
        > > or mix it all!
        > >
        > > How are you guys doing it? Is there a good software out there for wood
        > > and brass addict? Any suggestions welcome.
        > >
        > > Charles C
        > > Phoenix, AZ
        > >
        > >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > -----
        > No virus found in this message.
        > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6098 - Release Date: 02/11/13
        >
        >
      • J. Charles Chapuis
        Thank you all for your replies. I am looking for something like Larry s screen shot, definitively with a picture and if possible 3 to 4 pics? I guess, I ll
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 12, 2013
          Thank you all for your replies. I am looking for something like Larry's screen shot, definitively with a picture and if possible 3 to 4 pics?
          I guess, I'll have to learn Access, but I meanwhile I'll better use Excel to keep the information at one place. 
          Charles


          From: Larry S. Pierce <mathew_brady@...>
          To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 11:04 AM
          Subject: Re: [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection

          As far as entering the data, it would.  But as far as displaying,
          ordering, and using the data, it would not.  Each row in Excell is very
          much the same as a data record in Access.  In fact, you can translate
          back and forth between Excell and Access in that way.

          Here are the things that I use Access for that Excell cannot do:

          -display a photo or photos of the object while looking at its data
          -look at only Anthony (or any other manufacturer) cameras
          -view stereocards on the computer in stereo
          -for each collection item, by entering a short acronym, to have the
          entire company name and address and other company data instantly
          associated with it, because company data is stored in another table
          (e.g., all I enter is "ao" and the computer knows that it is American
          Optical Co., Scovill Mfg. Co. proprietors, address, founding date,
          ending date, etc.)
          -(related to the last one) always have a company name (camera model
          name, any other repetitively entered data) be the same each time, rather
          than how you thought to enter it that day (Excell's autofill feature
          helps with this)
          -produce canned lists, e.g., "cameras not photographed yet", or "cameras
          made prior to 1900", or "Scovill cameras made prior to 1900", or
          "cameras without a lens (or an original case)" (to look for potential
          matches if I am buying a lens or a camera-less case).

          Currently, my collection database only links two tables: a "collection
          items" table to a "manufacturer" table.  I was going to link in a
          "models" table to "collection items" which would bring in the beginning
          and ending dates when each model was made, but it would only be
          worthwhile if I had lots of the same model (like a Leica collection
          maybe) so I abandoned it.

          If you have an Excell spread sheet that contains your data, import it
          into Access.  Then choose <new form> and choose the form wizard to make
          a form from the resulting table.  Done.  The rest is making it look like
          you want (or adding in the Manufacturer's table for repetitive entries).



          On 2/12/2013 4:10 AM, John Rushton wrote:
          > Hi Larry, Charles and All,
          >
          > Would Microsoft Excel be equally good for making a camera inventory? This
          > would get around another learning curve for MS Access.
          >
          > Best Wishes,
          > John
          >
          > ________________
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
          > [mailto:woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>] On
          > Behalf Of Larry S. Pierce
          > Sent: 12 February 2013 03:43
          > To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Subject: Re: [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection [1
          > Attachment]
          >
          > I also use a custom MSAccess database. It is not very difficult to learn
          > enough to make up a database and form. Attached is my screenshot.
          > Cameras, catalogs, other accessories get tracked. The other half of the
          > story is having tie-on tags or markings on each piece so that items that
          > have a history together stay forever linked. For instance, the camera
          > pictured in my example would have six pieces marked: the case, the camera
          > body, the lensboard, the plateholder, the clip-off back, and the ground
          > glass frame that pulls out of the clip-off back.
          >
          > On 2/10/2013 9:48 AM, Rob Niederman wrote:
          >  > I use a database program such as Microsoft Access. It's a bit more
          >  > work to set up, but you can do data sorts & searches, price value
          >  > totals, and so forth. Here is a screenshot of my entry template for
          >  > cameras (that's all I track); but you can also add links to pictures
          >  > and adapt it for anything acquired. - Rob
          >  >
          >  > *From:*J. Charles [mailto:steamer369@...
          > <mailto:steamer369%40yahoo.com>]
          >  > *Sent:* Saturday, February 09, 2013 11:37 PM
          >  > *To:* woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:woodandbrass%40yahoogroups.com>
          >  > *Subject:* [woodandbrass] How to keep track of your collection
          >  >
          >  > Hi All,
          >  > As my collection keeps growing, I need help finding an efficient way
          >  > of keeping track of my purchases, pictures, references before I forget
          >  > or mix it all!
          >  >
          >  > How are you guys doing it? Is there a good software out there for wood
          >  > and brass addict? Any suggestions welcome.
          >  >
          >  > Charles C
          >  > Phoenix, AZ
          >  >
          >  >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > -----
          > No virus found in this message.
          > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6098 - Release Date: 02/11/13
          >
          >


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        • Marcel Safier
          Only months ago, we noted the passing of Fred Friedman of New Jersey. Now I had the sad duty to let group members know of the passing of Eric Evans on
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 29, 2016
            Only months ago, we noted the passing of Fred Friedman of New Jersey. Now I had the sad duty to let group members know of the passing of Eric Evans on Wednesday, 26 October. Eric lived in Sheffield, Yorkshire and assembled one of the largest collection of branded British wood and brass cameras, totaling over 300.  Eric continued to derive great pleasure from new finds, especially if it was a maker he didn't have an example by. He was always a gracious host and happy to let you handle and photograph his treasures as he pointed out salient features. I visited him 4 times in the last few years, every time my travels took me the UK. Darrin Hill wrote a nice bio on the Facebook Wood and Brass group that I copy here: "Eric was someone who wouldn't perhaps be particularly popular in America, he lead his life based on very firmly held socialist principles. He always put others first. He was a true gentleman and it was rare for anyone to feel the full force of his formidable intellect, instead he would gently encourage in the right direction. He was a lifelong Socialist and worked tirelessly to promote the common good. He started life the son of a Yorkshire miner who died early from an industrial disease and was the first in our family to receive higher education. He was an athlete when younger and briefly ( almost accidentally ) played professional rugby league) .after a career educating kids he became a journalist using his photographic skills to illustrate road test reports on motor caravans and spent the last 30 years or so of his leisure time restoring and collecting old cameras. Apart from his abiding belief in the inherent goodness of human nature his other great quality as a fine person was his unremitting loyalty to his family and to his wife Maureen who he adored absolutely until her death some years ago. He was possessed of an astonishing memory and intellect and it is fair to say the camera world has lost an undoubted expert on early English wood and brass."

            Vale my friend.

            Cheers!

            Marcel
            --
            Marcel Safier
            Brisbane, Australia

          • Michael Pritchard
            So sorry to hear of Eric s passing. Dr Michael Pritchard www.mpritchard.com
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 30, 2016

              So sorry to hear of Eric’s passing.

               

              Dr Michael Pritchard

              www.mpritchard.com

              www.britishphotohistory.ning.com

               

               

               

              From: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com [mailto:woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com]
              Sent: 30 October 2016 06:44
              To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [woodandbrass] Eric Evans - RIP

               

               

              Only months ago, we noted the passing of Fred Friedman of New Jersey. Now I had the sad duty to let group members know of the passing of Eric Evans on Wednesday, 26 October. Eric lived in Sheffield, Yorkshire and assembled one of the largest collection of branded British wood and brass cameras, totaling over 300.  Eric continued to derive great pleasure from new finds, especially if it was a maker he didn't have an example by. He was always a gracious host and happy to let you handle and photograph his treasures as he pointed out salient features. I visited him 4 times in the last few years, every time my travels took me the UK. Darrin Hill wrote a nice bio on the Facebook Wood and Brass group that I copy here: "Eric was someone who wouldn't perhaps be particularly popular in America, he lead his life based on very firmly held socialist principles. He always put others first. He was a true gentleman and it was rare for anyone to feel the full force of his formidable intellect, instead he would gently encourage in the right direction. He was a lifelong Socialist and worked tirelessly to promote the common good. He started life the son of a Yorkshire miner who died early from an industrial disease and was the first in our family to receive higher education. He was an athlete when younger and briefly ( almost accidentally ) played professional rugby league) .after a career educating kids he became a journalist using his photographic skills to illustrate road test reports on motor caravans and spent the last 30 years or so of his leisure time restoring and collecting old cameras. Apart from his abiding belief in the inherent goodness of human nature his other great quality as a fine person was his unremitting loyalty to his family and to his wife Maureen who he adored absolutely until her death some years ago. He was possessed of an astonishing memory and intellect and it is fair to say the camera world has lost an undoubted expert on early English wood and brass."

              Vale my friend.

              Cheers!

              Marcel
              --
              Marcel Safier
              Brisbane, Australia


               


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