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Re: Fwd: [woodandbrass] Early Gandolfi cameras

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  • harkabee
    Hello Fred The A&N camera in PW111 does have similarities with Gandolfi cameras, and Sands Hunter was a major customer, so it s possibly one of his. The only
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 31, 2012
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      Hello Fred
      The A&N camera in PW111 does have similarities with Gandolfi cameras, and Sands Hunter was a major customer, so it's possibly one of his. The only thing that jars a bit is that L-shaped wooden bracket stiffening the front, which I don't recall having seen elsewhere amongst Gandolfis - more Meagher-like?
      The 1/4-plate repeating camera (you sent me pictures of it a while ago) does look quite like the prison/police cameras, though all the others of that sort (that I've seen) have a fixed rear standard and a moving front, the converse of what you have. Presumably that's to provide plenty of strength for the back which is subject to a lot of work as the repeating back is banged one way and the other. Otherwise it is a close match in style and function.
      Cheers
      John

      --- In woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com, Maren /Fred Friedman <marenfred@...> wrote:
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      > Begin forwarded message:
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      > > From: Maren /Fred Friedman <marenfred1@...>
      > > Date: March 29, 2012 5:27:31 PM EDT
      > > To: woodandbrass@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: Re: [woodandbrass] Early Gandolfi cameras
      > >
      > > Hello John,
      > > As for early Gandolfi cameras I have one, perhaps 2 examples. The first which may be a Louis Gandolfi camera (or not) is described in my article on badges and badgers in PW111, Page 23. The other is truly Louis Gandolfi and "L. Gandolfi, Maker, London" is clearly stamped on the back of the lensboard. It is a 1'4 plate camera in mahogany with a repeating back for 2, 2 1/8 x 3 inch exposures on a 1/4 plate. A prison camera, perhaps? The lens is a 5 1/4 inch Swift & Son Detective Paragon F4, serial # 5410. It is mounted on a behind the lens roller blind shutter. Lovely and unusual, especially in this fine condition. Swift used Jena glass, presumably to enable the speed of F4 and the lens was manufacured from 1891 -1898 according to the Lens Collectors Vademecum. The camera
      > >
      > >
      > > and lens thus would date in the early 1890's. I will attach photo if possible or will send it in a separate email directly to you.
      > > Cheers,
      > > Fred Friedman
      > > On Mar 29, 2012, at 7:03 AM, John Marriage wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >> I am writing an article for Photographica World based on various papers held in the NMeM and with Sir Ken Corfield. Although I have several Gandolfi cameras from the period after the Great War, I have nothing earlier and have seen nothing earlier, though the firm was established in 1885. It has been said in print that the very early products were nothing special, pretty much run-of-the-mill for the period. But without evidence, I'd prefer not to just repeat that.
      > >> So, does anyone have any 1885-1920 Gandolfi cameras, or have you seen one, or could you let me have photographs?
      > >> Thanks
      > >> John Marriage
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
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