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Postcard from Chitrakoot: In a remote part of India, female reporters crusade fo

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  • Neeraj Bhushan
    Postcard from Chitrakoot: In a remote part of India, female reporters crusade for rural journalism On a scorching afternoon in Chitrakoot, a woman named
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 20, 2009
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      Postcard from Chitrakoot: In a remote part of India, female reporters crusade for rural journalism

      On a scorching afternoon in Chitrakoot, a woman named Tabassum walks into a small, sticky government hospital and sits poised with her notebook listening to the doctor. A reporter for Khabar Lahariya, a weekly rural newspaper that reaches 400 villages, Tabassum is investigating a story based on reports that villagers suffering from tuberculosis are not being treated. "We don't send health personnel," the doctor explains. "The sick person should come to be examined."

      Tabassum insists that physicians have previously been sent for check-ups to other distant villages where the necessary facilities are not available. The thirty-two-year-old reporter leaves with a promise that two medical officers will be quickly dispatched. "I'll see what happens and discuss the next step at our editorial meeting," she says.

      Khabar Lahariya—the name means "news waves"—is run entirely by underprivileged women in Chitrakoot, a remote corner of India's deep hinterland. Desperately poor, the region's arid expanse overflows with social and economic strife. Train passengers on their way from Delhi talk about the drought-plagued, barren fields that line their fifteen-hour journey. The crops have failed for the past four years, and farmers are frantic for rain.

      Read full story at http://www.raisinahills.com/2009/10/postcard-from-chitrakoot.html

      Thanks and regards.
      Neeraj Bhushan
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