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[women-csd] question for the list

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  • Jlp628@aol.com
    Hello everyone. My name is Janet Parker and I m a doctoral candidate in ethics at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Some of you already know that I am
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 4, 1999
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      Hello everyone. My name is Janet Parker and I'm a doctoral candidate in
      ethics at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Some of you already know
      that I am doing my dissertation on ecofeminist and indigenous perspectives on
      sustainable development. I have a question that I would like to pose to
      the list, because your feedback would be extremely helpful to me. I would
      like to hear your perpsectives, particularly those of you who have been
      involved in the CSD over the past few years, about how successful women and
      women's organizations have been in getting their perspective, viewpoints,
      concerns, and agendas into the mainstream CSD debate and resulting reports
      that have come out. Do you feel that women's voices and perspectives have
      been marginalized in the CSD process or do you feel that they have been
      integrated in effective ways and had a genuine impact on the development of
      the UN understanding of sustainable development?

      Secondly, I am interested in identifying women's NGOs and organizations
      around the world that operate explicitly or at least implicitly out of an
      ecofeminist perspective, integrating in a conscious way the concern for
      women's rights and well-being with concern for the environment and activist
      work to address environmental issues. I am particularly interested in
      identifying ecofeminist organizations that are rooted in a local community
      and fighting for local women's, community, and environmental concerns. Also,
      I would be most interested in hearing about organizations that are located in
      either the Americas or in India. Any information you have about such
      organizations would be very helpful.


      Thank you so much for taking the time to read this.

      Janet Parker
      Union Theological Seminary in New York
    • Lin Pugh
      Hi Janet For questions like this I suggest you also look up information on Mapping the World of Women s Information Services: www.iiav.nl/mapping-the-world.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 5, 1999
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        Hi Janet
        For questions like this I suggest you also look up information on Mapping the World of Women's Information Services:
        www.iiav.nl/mapping-the-world.

        Sincerely

        Lin Pugh
        Manager
        Knowledge Sharing Program
        IIAV (International Information Centre and Archives for the Women's Movement)

        -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
        Van: Jlp628@... [SMTP:Jlp628@...]
        Verzonden: maandag 4 oktober 1999 19:51
        Aan: women-csd@egroups.com
        Onderwerp: [women-csd] question for the list

        << Bestand: ATT00012.html >>
      • Wakerala@aol.com
        ... As I read this I wondered if I could be of help to you. Your focus on ecofeminist and indigenous perspectives on sustainable development reminds me that
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 6, 1999
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          Dear Janet Parker, you wrote:

          >I am doing my dissertation on ecofeminist and indigenous perspectives on
          >sustainable development.

          >I am interested in identifying women's NGOs and organizations
          >around the world that operate explicitly or at least implicitly out of an
          >ecofeminist perspective, integrating in a conscious way the concern for
          >women's rights and well-being with concern for the environment and activist
          >work to address environmental issues. I am particularly interested in
          >identifying ecofeminist organizations that are rooted in a local community
          >and fighting for local women's, community, and environmental concerns.

          As I read this I wondered if I could be of help to you. Your focus "on
          ecofeminist and indigenous perspectives on sustainable development" reminds
          me that I began from an indigenous perspective on sustainable development but
          I did not conceive of an ecofeminist perspective. I have been asking, How
          can a poor indigenous population (without outside help) create high
          well-being standards for themselves? After ten years of research into this
          question I am finding that the significant answers lie in the ecofeminist
          perspective. That is, ecofeninist, has been for me a conclusion, not a
          starting point.

          Let me show you a bit of the logic which leads to ecofeminism. Sustainable
          development really means the development of humans to be sustainable. And
          sustainability means that the population under study has learned (developed)
          two essential behavior patterns: limited exploitation of ecosystem services
          and limited (stabilized) population. That is, well-being has to be high
          enough to cause moms and dads to choose small families and at the same time
          the consumption of ecosystem services must be small (not exceed the rate of
          ecosystem regeneration).

          For ten years I have been studying a large human population which has both
          these behaviors. And I have been asking why this population has these
          behaviors when most the remainder of human populations do not. The small
          consumption side is easy to answer---more Earth resources per capita are not
          available, that is, the condition of ecosystem limits which we may expect to
          hit world-wide in the 21st century have been in place for most of the 20th
          century within my venue of study, India.

          The large population (30 million) with the well-being measures high enough to
          cause voluntary choices for small families (a stable TFR = 1.7) is the state
          of Kerala within India. We explained the necessary condition of low
          consumption as a consequence of ecosystem shortages in India which are
          equally short in Kerala. The cause of the high well-being measures in Kerala
          and not in India must, therefore, be explained. We have spent most of the
          last ten years examining all possible differences between India and Kerala.
          The several well-being measures, of course, explain each other but they are
          all in Kerala and part of the same thing. Only one difference between Kerala
          and all India is consistent and more than 100 years deep in the history of
          India and Kerala within India. The survival rate of women relative to men in
          India has declined regularly throughout the century. And the survival rate
          of women relative to men in Kerala has increased regularly throughout the
          century as is true most everywhere.

          The stark facts are an increasing devaluation of women and women's special
          functions in the culture of India, while during the same time women have been
          valued in Kerala. We do not find that women of Kerala have unusually high
          status by western standards. We do find that women of India have very low
          status. In the absence of any other factors of difference in the relative
          ecological, economic or political endowment between India and Kerala, we are
          confident that it is the low status of women (especially little girls) in the
          culture of India which causes the low well-being product in India and the
          resulting maintenance of high birth rates in India.

          If you should study Kerala note that "eco" consciousness is scarcely more
          than it is in USA, and the "feminism" practiced in Kerala may not be up to
          the standards in USA. In order to see the difference you must look at the
          treatment of little girls in India as against the treatment of little girls
          in Kerala.

          I shall be glad to share more with you according to your interest.

          William M. Alexander
          Emeritus Professor of World Food Politics
          California Polytechnic State University
          walexand@...
          637 Bambi Lane, Santa Rosa, CA 95409
          707 573 4560 wakerala@...
        • Jlp628@aol.com
          Dear Dr. Alexander Thank you for responding to my question. You wrote to me before asking for information about ecofeminism in India, I believe, and I
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 6, 1999
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            Dear Dr. Alexander

            Thank you for responding to my question. You wrote to me before asking for
            information about ecofeminism in India, I believe, and I referred you to
            Sarah Anderson at Union. Did you get in contact with her? I was very
            intrigued to get your email because I am actually considering looking for an
            ecofeminist organization in India, and Kerala would be a good place to look.
            Do you happen to know of any ecofeminist organizations in Kerala, or
            organizations that have an implicitly ecofeminist approach? I'm guessing you
            don't, because that's probably why you were contacting me, but I was just
            wondering. You do know the work of Vandana Shiva, don't you? She is the
            most prominent Indian ecofeminist, but there are others such as Gabrielle
            Dietrich, for one. If I do decide to pursue the Indian angle, I will let you
            know and we can be in dialogue.

            Thanks again,

            Janet Parker
            Union Theological Seminary in New York
          • Vegard Iversen
            Dear Alexandra and Janet, I would be very happy to give you academic references on Ecofeminism since I did my Masters in Gender and Development. I could also
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 7, 1999
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              Dear Alexandra and Janet,

              I would be very happy to give you academic references on Ecofeminism since I
              did my Masters in Gender and Development. I could also give you a brief
              critique of this school of thought if you have not come across it. If you
              are looking for organisations in India....I could make some inquires since I
              am from India and have worked with different NGOs in Bangalore and Delhi.
              There is an environmental list server which I subscribe to....which can be
              useful in terms of making inquires. Please get back to me as to what I can
              do for you.

              Regards
              Shalini Grover
              PHD STudent
              Centre for the Comparative Study of Culture, Environment and Development,
              Sussex University
              UK

              (This is a shared e-mail account with my husband..... Vegard Iversen)


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Jlp628@... <Jlp628@...>
              To: women-csd@egroups.com <women-csd@egroups.com>
              Date: 07 October 1999 03:30
              Subject: [women-csd] Re: question for the list


              >Dear Dr. Alexander
              >
              >Thank you for responding to my question. You wrote to me before asking for
              >information about ecofeminism in India, I believe, and I referred you to
              >Sarah Anderson at Union. Did you get in contact with her? I was very
              >intrigued to get your email because I am actually considering looking for
              an
              >ecofeminist organization in India, and Kerala would be a good place to
              look.
              >Do you happen to know of any ecofeminist organizations in Kerala, or
              >organizations that have an implicitly ecofeminist approach? I'm guessing
              you
              >don't, because that's probably why you were contacting me, but I was just
              >wondering. You do know the work of Vandana Shiva, don't you? She is the
              >most prominent Indian ecofeminist, but there are others such as Gabrielle
              >Dietrich, for one. If I do decide to pursue the Indian angle, I will let
              you
              >know and we can be in dialogue.
              >
              >Thanks again,
              >
              >Janet Parker
              >Union Theological Seminary in New York
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
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              >
              >eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/women-csd
              >http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Jlp628@aol.com
              Dear Shalini, It was wonderful to hear from you. Thanks for responding to my request. I have read some critiques of ecofeminism, but I would be very
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 7, 1999
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                Dear Shalini,

                It was wonderful to hear from you. Thanks for responding to my request. I
                have read some critiques of ecofeminism, but I would be very interested to
                hear your perspsective or the critique you are familiar with, particularly if
                it is from an Indian/ThirdWorld perspective. And yes, if you could make
                inquiries for me about organizations in India which are either explicitly
                ecofeminist, or have a similar approach, that would be very helpful.

                For my dissertation, I am focusing on certain key aspects of sustainable
                development, which I have gleaned from my reading of ecofeminist and
                indigenous literature. It seems to me that to some extent, both ecofeminists
                (particularly in the Third World) and indigenous people(s) are fighting for
                land rights, or access to traditional and communal lands, so that they can
                support their communities in sustainable and culturally-appropriate ways, and
                resist (or navigate) the exploitative dynamics of the global market economy.
                Many ecofeminists, such as Vandana Shiva, emphasize the need for communities
                to retain control over their traditional land base and to have the right to
                control their land and use it for subsistence purposes or for purposes they
                choose that benefit local communities. I believe that this resonates with
                the demand of indigenous peoples for sovereignty over their traditional
                lands.

                A second aspect which I have found that ecofeminsts share with indigenous
                peoples is a concern for preserving and respecting local cultures, wisdom,
                knowledge and practices, and a resistance to the imposition of culturally
                inappropriate technologies. Finally, I think both groups relate to the
                natural world in ways different from the dominant, Western culture. Rather
                than relating to nature as resource, commodity, tool, etc., ecofeminist and
                indigenous voices call us to relate to nature as our relatives, as living
                beings with intrinsic value, deserving our respect and appreciation, and even
                our recognition of their inherent sacredness. Given the resonance between
                ecofeminists and indigenous peoples around issues of Land, Culture and the
                relationship to the natural world, I am hoping to use their perspectives to
                investigate and critique current understandings and practices of sustainable
                development.

                Sorry for the long description, but I thought it would help you to know what
                I am specifically interested in in order for you to help me locate
                organizations in India working on these issues (from the perspective of women
                particularly). If any one else is reading this, I would certainly welcome
                suggestions or comments from you as well.

                Thank you.

                Janet Parker
                Union Theological Seminary in New York
              • theraos
                Dear Janet, I would like to introduce you to the Jardhar model in the Tehri Garhwal area which is an off shoot of the Chipko movement, which was an
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 8, 1999
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                  Dear Janet,
                  I would like to introduce you to the Jardhar model in the Tehri Garhwal
                  area which is an off shoot of the Chipko movement, which was an
                  eco-feminist movement and has continued to go beyond eco-feminism to
                  bio-diversity mapping and documentation. The project is funded and
                  researched by an organisation called Kalpavriksh, a Delhi based NGO and the
                  leader of the project is Ashsis Kothari.
                  with warm regards,
                  Nina Rao.



                  At 13:13 07/10/99 EDT, you wrote:
                  >Dear Shalini,
                  >
                  >It was wonderful to hear from you. Thanks for responding to my request. I
                  >have read some critiques of ecofeminism, but I would be very interested to
                  >hear your perspsective or the critique you are familiar with, particularly
                  if
                  >it is from an Indian/ThirdWorld perspective. And yes, if you could make
                  >inquiries for me about organizations in India which are either explicitly
                  >ecofeminist, or have a similar approach, that would be very helpful.
                  >
                  >For my dissertation, I am focusing on certain key aspects of sustainable
                  >development, which I have gleaned from my reading of ecofeminist and
                  >indigenous literature. It seems to me that to some extent, both
                  ecofeminists
                  >(particularly in the Third World) and indigenous people(s) are fighting for
                  >land rights, or access to traditional and communal lands, so that they can
                  >support their communities in sustainable and culturally-appropriate ways,
                  and
                  >resist (or navigate) the exploitative dynamics of the global market
                  economy.
                  >Many ecofeminists, such as Vandana Shiva, emphasize the need for communities
                  >to retain control over their traditional land base and to have the right to
                  >control their land and use it for subsistence purposes or for purposes they
                  >choose that benefit local communities. I believe that this resonates with
                  >the demand of indigenous peoples for sovereignty over their traditional
                  >lands.
                  >
                  >A second aspect which I have found that ecofeminsts share with indigenous
                  >peoples is a concern for preserving and respecting local cultures, wisdom,
                  >knowledge and practices, and a resistance to the imposition of culturally
                  >inappropriate technologies. Finally, I think both groups relate to the
                  >natural world in ways different from the dominant, Western culture. Rather
                  >than relating to nature as resource, commodity, tool, etc., ecofeminist and
                  >indigenous voices call us to relate to nature as our relatives, as living
                  >beings with intrinsic value, deserving our respect and appreciation, and
                  even
                  >our recognition of their inherent sacredness. Given the resonance between
                  >ecofeminists and indigenous peoples around issues of Land, Culture and the
                  >relationship to the natural world, I am hoping to use their perspectives to
                  >investigate and critique current understandings and practices of sustainable
                  >development.
                  >
                  >Sorry for the long description, but I thought it would help you to know what
                  >I am specifically interested in in order for you to help me locate
                  >organizations in India working on these issues (from the perspective of
                  women
                  >particularly). If any one else is reading this, I would certainly welcome
                  >suggestions or comments from you as well.
                  >
                  >Thank you.
                  >
                  >Janet Parker
                  >Union Theological Seminary in New York
                  >
                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >@Backup - The #1 Online Backup Service. Protect your files before
                  >you lose them. Easy, Reliable, Secure online backups. INSTALL
                  >today. http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/938
                  >
                  >
                  >eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/women-csd
                  >http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Vegard Iversen
                  Dear Janet, You said that you had read a few critiques of eco-feminism, however, I am going to list a few sources just in case you have missed out on these
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 10, 1999
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                    Dear Janet,

                    You said that you had read a few critiques of eco-feminism, however, I am
                    going to list a few sources just in case you have missed out on these
                    readings.

                    1. R. Braidotti et al (1994) "Women, the Environment and Sustainable
                    Development, Towards a Theortical Synthesis", Zed Books.

                    2. C. Jacksons (1993) "Environmentalisms and Gender Issues in the Third
                    World." Development and Change, 24, 1993.

                    3. "Mies and Shiva's Ecofeminism: A New Testament", Feminist Review, 49,
                    1995.

                    4. C Levy "Gender and the Environment: The Challenge of Cross-Cutting Issues
                    in Development Policy and Planning", Environment and Urbanisation, 4, 1,
                    1992.

                    For the best critique from India read;

                    1. B Agarwal "The Gender and Environment Debate: Lessons from India",
                    Feminist Review, 18, 1, 1992.

                    I am sure you are familiar with sources on eco-feminism by Shiva, Warren,
                    Harcourt etc.

                    Now at the Masters level the topic on "Eco-feminism" was under the heading;
                    Women, Gender and Environmental Policy. The main question we looked at was
                    the following. We were given this quotation; ".....women have a special
                    relationship with the environment and retains close links with the natural
                    resource base" . Critically discuss these assertions paying attention to a)
                    the relationship between womens poverty and environmental poverty b) the
                    potential strategies for gender sensitive sustainable development.

                    The most recent sources of literature that have addressed gender and the
                    environment have been very critical of eco-feminism. They see it more as an
                    ideology. The main critiques of eco-feminism (as you may have read them) is
                    that the assertion that "women are closer to nature" is essentialist,
                    biologically deterministic and lacking in historical and material analysis.
                    Many authors have pointed out that women exploit the environment as much as
                    men do.....the way men and women are affected by the enviornment crisis and
                    the strategies they employ is gender-specific. Women are not necessarily
                    better enviornmental managers, nor are there interests necessarily and
                    automatically promoted by conservation. Moreover, "women" cannot be posited
                    (as the ecofeminism discourse has done so) as a unitary category, even
                    within a country let alone in the third world!. We need to look at men,
                    women and the enviornment.

                    Agarwal's article provides a theorectical perspective that locates both the
                    symbolic and material links between people and the enviornment in their
                    specific forms of interaction and traces gender and class differentiation in
                    these links to a given gender and class division of labour, property and
                    power.

                    So these are some of the crtiques. I personally find that the co-feminist
                    debate has created a great deal of awareness about gender issues in relation
                    to the environment. However, I too differ on a lot of the issues they have
                    been arguing about. Similarly there are many important sources on the Chipko
                    Movement that will give you different insights about the movement......that
                    there is much more than the issue of women protecting the enviornment.

                    I will try and locate some organisations for you. I am not sure whether
                    urban organisations will know about eco-feminist groups. the most famous
                    ofcourse is Shiva's organisation.....if you approach them they can lead you
                    on and Nina also mentioned a group.

                    I hope that this information comes to some use for you........as I mentioned
                    it is what we studied at the Masters Level.
                    Regards
                    Shalini

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Jlp628@... <Jlp628@...>
                    To: women-csd@egroups.com <women-csd@egroups.com>
                    Date: 07 October 1999 18:13
                    Subject: [women-csd] Re: question for the list


                    >Dear Shalini,
                    >
                    >It was wonderful to hear from you. Thanks for responding to my request. I
                    >have read some critiques of ecofeminism, but I would be very interested to
                    >hear your perspsective or the critique you are familiar with, particularly
                    if
                    >it is from an Indian/ThirdWorld perspective. And yes, if you could make
                    >inquiries for me about organizations in India which are either explicitly
                    >ecofeminist, or have a similar approach, that would be very helpful.
                    >
                    >For my dissertation, I am focusing on certain key aspects of sustainable
                    >development, which I have gleaned from my reading of ecofeminist and
                    >indigenous literature. It seems to me that to some extent, both
                    ecofeminists
                    >(particularly in the Third World) and indigenous people(s) are fighting for
                    >land rights, or access to traditional and communal lands, so that they can
                    >support their communities in sustainable and culturally-appropriate ways,
                    and
                    >resist (or navigate) the exploitative dynamics of the global market
                    economy.
                    >Many ecofeminists, such as Vandana Shiva, emphasize the need for
                    communities
                    >to retain control over their traditional land base and to have the right to
                    >control their land and use it for subsistence purposes or for purposes they
                    >choose that benefit local communities. I believe that this resonates with
                    >the demand of indigenous peoples for sovereignty over their traditional
                    >lands.
                    >
                    >A second aspect which I have found that ecofeminsts share with indigenous
                    >peoples is a concern for preserving and respecting local cultures, wisdom,
                    >knowledge and practices, and a resistance to the imposition of culturally
                    >inappropriate technologies. Finally, I think both groups relate to the
                    >natural world in ways different from the dominant, Western culture. Rather
                    >than relating to nature as resource, commodity, tool, etc., ecofeminist and
                    >indigenous voices call us to relate to nature as our relatives, as living
                    >beings with intrinsic value, deserving our respect and appreciation, and
                    even
                    >our recognition of their inherent sacredness. Given the resonance between
                    >ecofeminists and indigenous peoples around issues of Land, Culture and the
                    >relationship to the natural world, I am hoping to use their perspectives to
                    >investigate and critique current understandings and practices of
                    sustainable
                    >development.
                    >
                    >Sorry for the long description, but I thought it would help you to know
                    what
                    >I am specifically interested in in order for you to help me locate
                    >organizations in India working on these issues (from the perspective of
                    women
                    >particularly). If any one else is reading this, I would certainly welcome
                    >suggestions or comments from you as well.
                    >
                    >Thank you.
                    >
                    >Janet Parker
                    >Union Theological Seminary in New York
                    >
                    >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    >@Backup - The #1 Online Backup Service. Protect your files before
                    >you lose them. Easy, Reliable, Secure online backups. INSTALL
                    >today. http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/938
                    >
                    >
                    >eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/women-csd
                    >http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Vegard Iversen
                    Dear Janet, This is what I found on my environment listserver....may be useful for you. Regards Shalini Dear Reader,A new sustainable development website
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 10, 1999
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                      Dear Janet,

                      This is what I found on my environment listserver....may be useful for you.
                      Regards
                      Shalini

                      Dear Reader,A new sustainable development website facility has been launched
                      by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and
                      Working Conditions (a nonprofit autonomous agency of the
                      European Union). We invite you to have a look at:http://susdev.eurofound.ie
                      The Foundation website includes an extensive 'links' listing of ±300
                      organisations who are pioneering sustainable development:* Conferences*
                      Networks
                      * Tools* Professional Training CoursesYOUR LISTING
                      If you have information on Conferences, Networks, Tools or Training
                      Courses related to Sustainable Development, we would very much
                      appreciate it if you would consider submitting your website for review.
                      When you get to the website please use the 'Conferences,
                      Networks, Tools or Training' buttons. Then use the 'browse' or
                      'search' facilities provided to find whether your website is already
                      presented or not. To add your information please use the online
                      'submit' form to create a new record.
                      The Foundation site will be developed further and maintained in the
                      future. Regular announcements will alert thousands of organisations
                      worldwide about its existence - it is hoped that this will bring new
                      visitors to your own website and generally strengthen interest and
                      knowledge in the area of sustainable development.PLEASE LINK
                      If you find the website interesting and supportive of your own work
                      please 'link' to http://susdev.eurofound.ie and let us know. Your
                      'linking' will be extremely supportive in helping us to build this web
                      resource and promote sustainable production and consumption.CONTACT
                      INFORMATION
                      If you need to contact us please email: susdev@... MAIL
                      Thank you in advance for your time and apologies for any cross
                      postings. If you object to receiving emails from us in the future
                      please reply to this email stating "UNWANTED" in the subject
                      header. You will receive no further email.WEB SITE DESIGN
                      This service from the Foundation has been designed and developed by:
                      'Environmental Design for Ecological Need B.V. (EDEN).
                      For more information on EDEN's database driven websites please
                      email: eden@... listserver.






                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Jlp628@... <Jlp628@...>
                      To: women-csd@egroups.com <women-csd@egroups.com>
                      Date: 04 October 1999 18:51
                      Subject: [women-csd] question for the list


                      >Hello everyone. My name is Janet Parker and I'm a doctoral candidate in
                      >ethics at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Some of you already know
                      >that I am doing my dissertation on ecofeminist and indigenous perspectives
                      on
                      >sustainable development. I have a question that I would like to pose to
                      >the list, because your feedback would be extremely helpful to me. I would
                      >like to hear your perpsectives, particularly those of you who have been
                      >involved in the CSD over the past few years, about how successful women and
                      >women's organizations have been in getting their perspective, viewpoints,
                      >concerns, and agendas into the mainstream CSD debate and resulting reports
                      >that have come out. Do you feel that women's voices and perspectives have
                      >been marginalized in the CSD process or do you feel that they have been
                      >integrated in effective ways and had a genuine impact on the development of
                      >the UN understanding of sustainable development?
                      >
                      >Secondly, I am interested in identifying women's NGOs and organizations
                      >around the world that operate explicitly or at least implicitly out of an
                      >ecofeminist perspective, integrating in a conscious way the concern for
                      >women's rights and well-being with concern for the environment and activist
                      >work to address environmental issues. I am particularly interested in
                      >identifying ecofeminist organizations that are rooted in a local community
                      >and fighting for local women's, community, and environmental concerns.
                      Also,
                      >I would be most interested in hearing about organizations that are located
                      in
                      >either the Americas or in India. Any information you have about such
                      >organizations would be very helpful.
                      >
                      >
                      >Thank you so much for taking the time to read this.
                      >
                      >Janet Parker
                      >Union Theological Seminary in New York
                      >
                      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      >
                      >eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/women-csd
                      >http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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