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Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

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  • Maximiliano R. Firtman
    HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation
    Message 1 of 23 , Nov 3, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation web technologies that some people adopted as part of HTML5 (for example, the Geolocation API)

      So, today, when someone talks about HTML5, they are talking about a series of abilities that a browser can or cannot support in a per-ability base. There is no one HTML5 compatibility boolean value for any browser, mobile or desktop.

      The HTML5 umbrella today is covering:
      • New semantic tags for replacing div and span usage
      • New attributes
      • Microdata
      • Custom data- attributes
      • New form controls and validation
      • New box model (Flex Model)
      • Touch events
      • SVG and inline-SVG
      • Canvas API 2D for drawing
      • Canvas API 3D aka WebGL
      • Multimedia new tags (video/audio) and API
      • CSS3 basic support, including new selectors
      • CSS3 transformations
      • CSS3 transitions
      • CSS3 animations
      • Custom Fonts
      • Offline API aka AppCache
      • Web Storage API
      • SQL Storage API
      • IndexDB Storage API
      • Orientation API
      • Web Workers API
      • Web Sockets API
      • File API
      • Drag and Drop API
      • Geolocation API
      • And more!
      I've wrote about this compatibility on my book "Programming the Mobile Web". But generally speaking about mobile browsers today, we can find different support regarding CSS3 stuff, Offline API, Multimedia tags & API, Web Storage API, Geolocation API, SQL Storage API, Canvas 2D API, SVG, Touch events & new form controls. This support (partially regarding the device) can be found on: Safari on iOS, Android Browser, BlackBerry Browser (RIM OS & Tablet OS), Bada WebKit Browser, LG Phantom Browser, Symbian Browser, webOS Browser. We should expect more support next year, as almost every browser vendor announced HTML5 support for next versions. But we need to be aware that this is not just a boolean value.


      For some of these abilities, I'm not really sure how useful will be a server-side detection mechanism. 

      Best Regards!

      Lic. Maximiliano Firtman
      Developer | Trainer | Author | Consulting 
      Mobile | Rich Internet Applications | Performance | Training

      Twitter  LinkedIn  Nokia Champion  Personal Page  Adobe User Group Manager
      Skype: maximiliano.firtman | Chat: firtman@... | Live MSN: firtman@...



      On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 15:13, David Rubin <davidrub@...> wrote:
       

      On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 4:10 PM, <ggerbrand@...> wrote:


      Blackberry devices also support HTML 5.

      That surprises me because not even desktops support html 5 fully yet :( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5

      This one is interesting   http://html5test.com/

      My Firefox 3.6 fails that test. 139 and 4 bonus points out of a total of 300 points

      Good to know though.

      David
       


    • Tim Akinbo
      Interesting conversation on smartphones. I think HTML5 compatibility is a poor measurement for whether a phone is smart or not but it seems these days it s
      Message 2 of 23 , Nov 4, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Interesting conversation on smartphones. I think HTML5 compatibility is a poor measurement for whether a phone is "smart" or not but it seems these days it's pretty much the standard. A phone being "smart" or not is really a subjective topic.

        On HTML5 compatibility, the best mobile browser seems to be coming from BlackBerry. See http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/20/blackberry-6s-webkit-based-browser-bests-the-competition-in-a-g/

        Tim Akinbo


        On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 7:45 PM, Maximiliano R. Firtman <firtman@...> wrote:
         

        HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation web technologies that some people adopted as part of HTML5 (for example, the Geolocation API)

        So, today, when someone talks about HTML5, they are talking about a series of abilities that a browser can or cannot support in a per-ability base. There is no one HTML5 compatibility boolean value for any browser, mobile or desktop.

        The HTML5 umbrella today is covering:
        • New semantic tags for replacing div and span usage
        • New attributes
        • Microdata
        • Custom data- attributes
        • New form controls and validation
        • New box model (Flex Model)
        • Touch events
        • SVG and inline-SVG
        • Canvas API 2D for drawing
        • Canvas API 3D aka WebGL
        • Multimedia new tags (video/audio) and API
        • CSS3 basic support, including new selectors
        • CSS3 transformations
        • CSS3 transitions
        • CSS3 animations
        • Custom Fonts
        • Offline API aka AppCache
        • Web Storage API
        • SQL Storage API
        • IndexDB Storage API
        • Orientation API
        • Web Workers API
        • Web Sockets API
        • File API
        • Drag and Drop API
        • Geolocation API
        • And more!
        I've wrote about this compatibility on my book "Programming the Mobile Web". But generally speaking about mobile browsers today, we can find different support regarding CSS3 stuff, Offline API, Multimedia tags & API, Web Storage API, Geolocation API, SQL Storage API, Canvas 2D API, SVG, Touch events & new form controls. This support (partially regarding the device) can be found on: Safari on iOS, Android Browser, BlackBerry Browser (RIM OS & Tablet OS), Bada WebKit Browser, LG Phantom Browser, Symbian Browser, webOS Browser. We should expect more support next year, as almost every browser vendor announced HTML5 support for next versions. But we need to be aware that this is not just a boolean value.


        For some of these abilities, I'm not really sure how useful will be a server-side detection mechanism. 

        Best Regards!

        Lic. Maximiliano Firtman
        Developer | Trainer | Author | Consulting 
        Mobile | Rich Internet Applications | Performance | Training

        Twitter  LinkedIn  Nokia Champion  Personal Page  Adobe User Group Manager
        Skype: maximiliano.firtman | Chat: firtman@... | Live MSN: firtman@...
      • Cristiano Diniz da Silva
        Basically what I do is to check the xhtml support level and if it supports ajax / javascript. When xhtml level is 3+ and supports javascript / ajax, then is
        Message 3 of 23 , Nov 4, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Basically what I do is to check the xhtml support level and if it supports ajax / javascript. When xhtml level is 3+ and supports javascript / ajax, then is smartphone.

          So far I have successfully detected all known smartphones, like iphones, bb, droids, etc.
           
          Cristiano Diniz da Silva

          Web Development & Solutions
          http://mcloide.wordpress.com
          PHP Series - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0557374022/
          PHP Series (pdf) - http://www.lulu.com/product/file-download/php-series---the-encore-beginner-version/6499638
          p. + 1 954 840 4010
          c. + 1 561 809 1928

          Coral Springs, Fl
          PHP5 Zend Certified Engineer

          Before printing, just keep in mind your commitment with the environment!



          From: Tim Akinbo <takinbo@...>
          To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, November 4, 2010 5:48:43 PM
          Subject: Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

           

          Interesting conversation on smartphones. I think HTML5 compatibility is a poor measurement for whether a phone is "smart" or not but it seems these days it's pretty much the standard. A phone being "smart" or not is really a subjective topic.

          On HTML5 compatibility, the best mobile browser seems to be coming from BlackBerry. See http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/20/blackberry-6s-webkit-based-browser-bests-the-competition-in-a-g/

          Tim Akinbo


          On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 7:45 PM, Maximiliano R. Firtman <firtman@...> wrote:
           

          HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation web technologies that some people adopted as part of HTML5 (for example, the Geolocation API)

          So, today, when someone talks about HTML5, they are talking about a series of abilities that a browser can or cannot support in a per-ability base. There is no one HTML5 compatibility boolean value for any browser, mobile or desktop.

          The HTML5 umbrella today is covering:
          • New semantic tags for replacing div and span usage
          • New attributes
          • Microdata
          • Custom data- attributes
          • New form controls and validation
          • New box model (Flex Model)
          • Touch events
          • SVG and inline-SVG
          • Canvas API 2D for drawing
          • Canvas API 3D aka WebGL
          • Multimedia new tags (video/audio) and API
          • CSS3 basic support, including new selectors
          • CSS3 transformations
          • CSS3 transitions
          • CSS3 animations
          • Custom Fonts
          • Offline API aka AppCache
          • Web Storage API
          • SQL Storage API
          • IndexDB Storage API
          • Orientation API
          • Web Workers API
          • Web Sockets API
          • File API
          • Drag and Drop API
          • Geolocation API
          • And more!
          I've wrote about this compatibility on my book "Programming the Mobile Web". But generally speaking about mobile browsers today, we can find different support regarding CSS3 stuff, Offline API, Multimedia tags & API, Web Storage API, Geolocation API, SQL Storage API, Canvas 2D API, SVG, Touch events & new form controls. This support (partially regarding the device) can be found on: Safari on iOS, Android Browser, BlackBerry Browser (RIM OS & Tablet OS), Bada WebKit Browser, LG Phantom Browser, Symbian Browser, webOS Browser. We should expect more support next year, as almost every browser vendor announced HTML5 support for next versions. But we need to be aware that this is not just a boolean value.


          For some of these abilities, I'm not really sure how useful will be a server-side detection mechanism. 

          Best Regards!

          Lic. Maximiliano Firtman
          Developer | Trainer | Author | Consulting 
          Mobile | Rich Internet Applications | Performance | Training

          Twitter  LinkedIn  Nokia Champion  Personal Page  Adobe User Group Manager
          Skype: maximiliano.firtman | Chat: firtman@... | Live MSN: firtman@...

        • Jesse Wakeley from HEROweb/MightyMerchant
          +1 to Cristiano. That’s the same approach I’ve been taking for determining a smartphone. It’s reassuring to hear I reached the same conclusion as someone
          Message 4 of 23 , Nov 4, 2010
          • 0 Attachment

            +1 to Cristiano. That’s the same approach I’ve been taking for determining a smartphone. It’s reassuring to hear I reached the same conclusion as someone definitely much more experienced in this field than I!

             

            ~Jesse

             

            From: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cristiano Diniz da Silva
            Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2010 3:59 PM
            To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

             

             

            Basically what I do is to check the xhtml support level and if it supports ajax / javascript. When xhtml level is 3+ and supports javascript / ajax, then is smartphone.

            So far I have successfully detected all known smartphones, like iphones, bb, droids, etc.

             

            Cristiano Diniz da Silva


            Web Development & Solutions
            http://mcloide.wordpress.com
            PHP Series - http://www .amazon.com/gp/product/0557374022/
            PHP Series (pdf) - http://www.lulu.com/product/file-download/php-series---the-encore-beginner-version/6499638
            p. + 1 954 840 4010
            c. + 1 561 809 1928
            Coral Springs, Fl
            PHP5 Zend Certified Engineer
            Before printing, just keep in mind your commitment with the environment!

             

             


            From: Tim Akinbo <takinbo@...>
            To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, November 4, 2010 5:48:43 PM
            Subject: Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

             

            Interesting conversation on smartphones. I think HTML5 compatibility is a poor measurement for whether a phone is "smart" or not but it seems these days it's pretty much the standard. A phone being "smart" or not is really a subjective topic.

            On HTML5 compatibility, the best mobile browser seems to be coming from BlackBerry. See http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/20/blackberry-6s-webkit-based-browser-bests-the-competition-in-a-g/

            Tim Akinbo

            On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 7:45 PM, Maximiliano R. Firtman <firtman@...> wrote:

             

            HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation web technologies that some people adopted as part of HTML5 (for example, the Geolocation API)

             

            So, today, when someone talks about HTML5, they are talking about a series of abilities that a browser can or cannot support in a per-ability base. There is no one HTML5 compatibility boolean value for any browser, mobile or desktop.

             

            The HTML5 umbrella today is covering:

            • New semantic tags for replacing div and span usage
            • New attributes
            • Microdata
            • Custom data- attributes
            • New form controls and validation
            • New box model (Flex Model)
            • Touch events
            • SVG and inline-SVG
            • Canvas API 2D for drawing
            • Canvas API 3D aka WebGL
            • Multimedia new tags (video/audio) and API
            • CSS3 basic support, including new selectors
            • CSS3 transformations
            • CSS3 transitions
            • CSS3 animations
            • Custom Fonts
            • Offline API aka AppCache
            • Web Storage API
            • SQL Storage API
            • IndexDB Storage API
            • Orientation API
            • Web Workers API
            • Web Sockets API
            • File API
            • Drag and Drop API
            • Geolocation API
            • And more!

            I've wrote about this compatibility on my book "Programming the Mobile Web". But generally speaking about mobile browsers today, we can find different support regarding CSS3 stuff, Offline API, Multimedia tags & API, Web Storage API, Geolocation API, SQL Storage API, Canvas 2D API, SVG, Touch events & new form controls. This support (partially regarding the device) can be found on: Safari on iOS, Android Browser, BlackBerry Browser (RIM OS & Tablet OS), Bada WebKit Browser, LG Phantom Browser, Symbian Browser, webOS Browser. We should expect more support next year, as almost every browser vendor announced HTML5 support for next versions. But we need to be aware that this is not just a boolean value.

             

             

            For some of these abilities, I'm not really sure how useful will be a server-side detection mechanism. 

             

            Best Regards!


            Lic. Maximiliano Firtman
            Developer | Trainer | Author | Consulting 
            Mobile | Rich Internet Applications | Performance | Training

            Twitter  LinkedIn  Nokia Champion  Personal Page  Adobe User Group Manager
            Skype: maximiliano.firtman | Chat: firtman@... | Live MSN: firtman@...

             

          • Cristiano Diniz da Silva
            Just a quick note: My application is very very simple, nothing very directed to any specific phone, but when this is the case, a more focused and objective way
            Message 5 of 23 , Nov 5, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Just a quick note: My application is very very simple, nothing very directed to any specific phone, but when this is the case, a more focused and objective way of detecting smartphones might be needed.
               
              Cristiano Diniz da Silva

              Web Development & Solutions
              http://mcloide.wordpress.com
              PHP Series - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0557374022/
              PHP Series (pdf) - http://www.lulu.com/product/file-download/php-series---the-encore-beginner-version/6499638
              p. + 1 954 840 4010
              c. + 1 561 809 1928

              Coral Springs, Fl
              PHP5 Zend Certified Engineer

              Before printing, just keep in mind your commitment with the environment!



              From: Jesse Wakeley from HEROweb/MightyMerchant <jesse@...>
              To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, November 4, 2010 7:20:21 PM
              Subject: RE: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

               

              +1 to Cristiano. That’s the same approach I’ve been taking for determining a smartphone. It’s reassuring to hear I reached the same conclusion as someone definitely much more experienced in this field than I!

               

              ~Jesse

               

              From: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cristiano Diniz da Silva
              Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2010 3:59 PM
              To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

               

               

              Basically what I do is to check the xhtml support level and if it supports ajax / javascript. When xhtml level is 3+ and supports javascript / ajax, then is smartphone.

              So far I have successfully detected all known smartphones, like iphones, bb, droids, etc.

               

              Cristiano Diniz da Silva


              Web Development & Solutions
              http://mcloide.wordpress.com
              PHP Series - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0557374022/
              PHP Series (pdf) - http://www.lulu.com/product/file-download/php-series---the-encore-beginner-version/6499638
              p. + 1 954 840 4010
              c. + 1 561 809 1928
              Coral Springs, Fl
              PHP5 Zend Certified Engineer
              Before printing, just keep in mind your commitment with the environment!

               

               


              From: Tim Akinbo <takinbo@...>
              To: wmlprogramming@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, November 4, 2010 5:48:43 PM
              Subject: Re: [wmlprogramming] Detect Smart Phone?

               

              Interesting conversation on smartphones. I think HTML5 compatibility is a poor measurement for whether a phone is "smart" or not but it seems these days it's pretty much the standard. A phone being "smart" or not is really a subjective topic.

              On HTML5 compatibility, the best mobile browser seems to be coming from BlackBerry. See http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/20/blackberry-6s-webkit-based-browser-bests-the-competition-in-a-g/

              Tim Akinbo

              On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 7:45 PM, Maximiliano R. Firtman <firtman@...> wrote:

               

              HTML5 is a set of common patterns and a set of APIs that are discussed in some kind of sub-APIs inside the HTML5 umbrella. There are also other new generation web technologies that some people adopted as part of HTML5 (for example, the Geolocation API)

               

              So, today, when someone talks about HTML5, they are talking about a series of abilities that a browser can or cannot support in a per-ability base. There is no one HTML5 compatibility boolean value for any browser, mobile or desktop.

               

              The HTML5 umbrella today is covering:

              • New semantic tags for replacing div and span usage
              • New attributes
              • Microdata
              • Custom data- attributes
              • New form controls and validation
              • New box model (Flex Model)
              • Touch events
              • SVG and inline-SVG
              • Canvas API 2D for drawing
              • Canvas API 3D aka WebGL
              • Multimedia new tags (video/audio) and API
              • CSS3 basic support, including new selectors
              • CSS3 transformations
              • CSS3 transitions
              • CSS3 animations
              • Custom Fonts
              • Offline API aka AppCache
              • Web Storage API
              • SQL Storage API
              • IndexDB Storage API
              • Orientation API
              • Web Workers API
              • Web Sockets API
              • File API
              • Drag and Drop API
              • Geolocation API
              • And more!

              I've wrote about this compatibility on my book "Programming the Mobile Web". But generally speaking about mobile browsers today, we can find different support regarding CSS3 stuff, Offline API, Multimedia tags & API, Web Storage API, Geolocation API, SQL Storage API, Canvas 2D API, SVG, Touch events & new form controls. This support (partially regarding the device) can be found on: Safari on iOS, Android Browser, BlackBerry Browser (RIM OS & Tablet OS), Bada WebKit Browser, LG Phantom Browser, Symbian Browser, webOS Browser. We should expect more support next year, as almost every browser vendor announced HTML5 support for next versions. But we need to be aware that this is not just a boolean value.

               

               

              For some of these abilities, I'm not really sure how useful will be a server-side detection mechanism. 

               

              Best Regards!


              Lic. Maximiliano Firtman
              Developer | Trainer | Author | Consulting 
              Mobile | Rich Internet Applications | Performance | Training

              Twitter  LinkedIn  Nokia Champion  Personal Page  Adobe User Group Manager
              Skype: maximiliano.firtman | Chat: firtman@... | Live MSN: firtman@...

               


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