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Re: [Wesleyan Theology] Re: Core Christian ideas

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  • Rev. Andrew B. Glos
    ... I do not disagree with this at all. Nor do I think that this contradict Christian resignation. The point is simple: If we are resigned, then we are
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2005
      --- hamgears <lmitchell@...> wrote:

      > I do see your point. What if black people had been
      > happy with their "place" in
      > the world and Rosa Parks had been thankful that the
      > requirement blacks sit at
      > the back of the bus had befallen her.

      I do not disagree with this at all. Nor do I think
      that this contradict Christian resignation.

      The point is simple: If we are resigned, then we are
      resigned to the will of God and not the will of the
      world, or any person, ideology, etc.

      In the case of sister Parks, she and the so-called
      civil rights movement which followed were just that.
      They were resigned to the will of God, the God who
      freed the slaves from Egypt and brought them to a land
      flowing with milk and honey, who made them a mighty
      nation among many.

      Resignation is not only accepting "thy will be
      done", as I said. It is also accepting, "thy will be
      done ON EARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVEN".

      God oders the detiny of all things (a la Job), but
      he also calls us to follow him in his mighty acts and
      bare the fruit of His love (a la Jesus Christ's
      "Follow me.").

      Andrew
    • Rev. Andrew B. Glos
      ... John puts well the distinction I was trying to make. The church has not always done all that it can to clarify this distinction. The Bible does not teach
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2005
        --- John Earp <j_earp@...> wrote:
        > I should hasten to add that I obviously have
        > absolutely no problem whatsoever with us having
        > complete resignation to **the will of God**. What I
        > have a problem with is the philosophy/theology that
        > assumes *everything that happens is God's will*,
        > period.

        John puts well the distinction I was trying to make.
        The church has not always done all that it can to
        clarify this distinction. The Bible does not teach
        determinism. Even most Calvinists do not teach it.
        Many things happen which are not the direct cause of
        God, but the result of sin, choice, etc.

        Andrew
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