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Questions about welding for my plow frame - flux core or arc?

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  • Scott Williams
    I have a beat old 89 Ford F250 diesel truck that I m putting a Western UniMount plow onto. The mount I have for it was welded onto a 91 F150, and I m going
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 9, 2011
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      I have a beat old '89 Ford F250 diesel truck that I'm putting a Western
      UniMount plow onto. The mount I have for it was welded onto a '91 F150, and
      I'm going to be putting it onto mine.

      To describe a plow mount for this truck, it is pretty much a frame that
      attaches to the front of the frame horns (after removing the metal bumper)
      and hangs down about a foot or so, with some big metal mounting tabs on the
      front of it. From the back side of the bottom, a bracket angles up to mount
      to the frame about a foot and a half back (so from the side it is shaped
      like a right triangle.) On this one, the rear frame is a little higher on
      one side than the other, because of the other truck's twisted frame.

      I have a Lincoln Weld-Pak 125HD flux core welder, and a Lincoln AC-225-S arc
      welder. I've never even used the arc welder, but I've read a lot about arc
      welding and I'd like to give it a try sometime.

      I know the flux core welder under sized to weld this frame to my truck
      frame, but is there a way to make it work, by grinding the metal some way,
      and doing multiple passes, going slow, watching the duty cycle? It needs to
      be welded to the ends of the frame horns at the front, and underneath the
      frame about 16" back. Probably a total of 3 or 4 feet of weld bead, 3" at a
      time. Some will be tricky, and I'll have to grind on the frame a lot to
      clean it up before welding. I've seen other plow mount welding jobs, and
      they didn't look like they would hold but they did. I'd rather do better,
      but I have to make do with what I have.

      I don't have 220 in my garage, and I also don't have confidence that I'll
      pick up arc welding quickly enough to do a good job with this task. I have
      determined that I could probably run the arc welder off of a 5000 Watt
      generator that I have, depending on how high the amperage would need to be
      set on the welder. What would be a good guess at a setting for welding this
      heavy frame onto my truck? And what rod would be my best bet, as a beginner
      and trying to keep the amps low?

      I know, I need to practice first, I'll have to go to the scrap yard and see
      if I can get some angle iron there to work with, and learn to make some
      beads. That's if I go the arc welder route.

      Also, what are the concerns for welding on my truck? I don't think it has
      any computers.

      Thanks for your thoughts,
      Scott in Penfield NY
    • jhn9840
      Not sure how thick your metal is on the mount. 1/8 E6011 @ around 115 amp give or take a few amps is where I would start. That weld pak is to undersized for
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 10, 2011
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        Not sure how thick your metal is on the mount. 1/8 E6011 @ around 115 amp give or take a few amps is where I would start. That weld pak is to undersized for the job. Even if it weren't stick is the way to go on this job. Used mount on a used truck has to involve amounts of dirt,rust,paint ect. Is this going to be driven on the road when you are done? If so be sure your skill is up to the task. Plow falling off flying down the road would not be pretty.
         
        jhn9840
        John
        From: Scott Williams <swillia5@...>
        To: welding_group@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, October 10, 2011 2:16 AM
        Subject: [welding_group] Questions about welding for my plow frame - flux core or arc?

         
        I have a beat old '89 Ford F250 diesel truck that I'm putting a Western
        UniMount plow onto. The mount I have for it was welded onto a '91 F150, and
        I'm going to be putting it onto mine.

        To describe a plow mount for this truck, it is pretty much a frame that
        attaches to the front of the frame horns (after removing the metal bumper)
        and hangs down about a foot or so, with some big metal mounting tabs on the
        front of it. From the back side of the bottom, a bracket angles up to mount
        to the frame about a foot and a half back (so from the side it is shaped
        like a right triangle.) On this one, the rear frame is a little higher on
        one side than the other, because of the other truck's twisted frame.

        I have a Lincoln Weld-Pak 125HD flux core welder, and a Lincoln AC-225-S arc
        welder. I've never even used the arc welder, but I've read a lot about arc
        welding and I'd like to give it a try sometime.

        I know the flux core welder under sized to weld this frame to my truck
        frame, but is there a way to make it work, by grinding the metal some way,
        and doing multiple passes, going slow, watching the duty cycle? It needs to
        be welded to the ends of the frame horns at the front, and underneath the
        frame about 16" back. Probably a total of 3 or 4 feet of weld bead, 3" at a
        time. Some will be tricky, and I'll have to grind on the frame a lot to
        clean it up before welding. I've seen other plow mount welding jobs, and
        they didn't look like they would hold but they did. I'd rather do better,
        but I have to make do with what I have.

        I don't have 220 in my garage, and I also don't have confidence that I'll
        pick up arc welding quickly enough to do a good job with this task. I have
        determined that I could probably run the arc welder off of a 5000 Watt
        generator that I have, depending on how high the amperage would need to be
        set on the welder. What would be a good guess at a setting for welding this
        heavy frame onto my truck? And what rod would be my best bet, as a beginner
        and trying to keep the amps low?

        I know, I need to practice first, I'll have to go to the scrap yard and see
        if I can get some angle iron there to work with, and learn to make some
        beads. That's if I go the arc welder route.

        Also, what are the concerns for welding on my truck? I don't think it has
        any computers.

        Thanks for your thoughts,
        Scott in Penfield NY



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