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Re: Newbie Help

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  • Johnny
    Elrod, There s also the old tried and true oxy-fuel welding. :-) You might already have the equipment and just need the consumables. Thank you for shopping at
    Message 1 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
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      Elrod,

      There's also the old tried and true oxy-fuel welding. :-) You might
      already have the equipment and just need the consumables.

      Thank you for shopping at Walmart, please come again...
      Johnathan


      --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Lutz" <elrod00@e...> wrote:
      > I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a welder.
      > So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past posts
      > to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore old
      > auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the holes
      > in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig or
      > tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better control?
      > I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
      > voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
      > refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you have
      > ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this then
      > I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
      > time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.
    • C. J. Frederick
      There are very few 3 phase TIG machines. They use one phase to acquire the AC wave. A small inverter machine that generates a square AC wave would be best
      Message 2 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
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        There are very few 3 phase TIG machines. They use one phase to acquire the AC
        wave. A small inverter machine that generates a square AC wave would be best
        for low amperage welding on thin materials. Having a shielding gas on the
        back
        side is a great idea, especially with the SS. I don't know what the alloy is
        for aluminum trim but if it is 6061 you can't use a piece of scrap for
        filler.
        It will crack.

        CJ

        >
        > I have used older tig machines that are not "high end" .  They do not
        perform
        > as well on the more difficult thin gauges.  Three phase machines are
        > not any smoother on the low end and are not any advantage to what your
        trying
        > to do. What your are trying to do is not easy,  In my opinion you need a
        > small" Hi End" machine with very good low amp performance -220 v single
        phase
        > -you will probably want to backsheild the stainless.  Color matching will be
        > trial and error                                 ----- Original Message -----
        >                                     From:
        > <mailto:elrod00@...>Richard Lutz
        >>
        >> To: <mailto:welding_group@yahoogroups.com>welding_group@yahoogroups.com
        >> Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 9:37 PM
        >> Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help
        >>
        >
        > Pot metal is not my problem. I have discovered multiple ways to deal
        > with it for replating and none of them include welding. My problem has
        > been with stainless and aluminum trim pieces that are not plated. They
        > are very thin and easily stressed by the heat. Also color matching can
        > be very difficult with even new stuff. Picture a mirror. Dirty you
        > don't notice imperfections or another dirty spot. Clean you notice the
        > most minute flaw or spec. TIG may be my best bet as you mention because
        > I can use a scrap piece(of which I have many)from the same era as
        > my "filler" rod. Now back to my original questions on the size, power
        > and gasses. Do I need a high end machine for a few seconds weld on thin
        > stuff? Does higher voltage supply and or multiple phases give smoother
        > or better control? Enough to make a difference? I am no ordinary dummy!
        > I am an extrordinary dummy! I just ain'''''''t up on welding. So by
        > robbing you'se guys minds I hope to save some trial and error and maybe
        > some expence. Thanks. Elrod.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "bvweld" <bvwelding@e...> wrote:
        > > Hi, I'm new to this group also. You will have to use tig.  I have a
        > > Miller syncrowave 250 and a Dynasty 300 DX. If you're sure you have
        > > aluminum and not pot metal (zinc alloy) it can be done. I have welded
        > > thin ga. aluminum down to welding two pop cans together for grins.
        > > You
        > > can use copper strips for backer's. I have had mixed results with pot
        > > metal.  As stated the zinc will make it difficult.  Unless it is an
        > > irreplacable item it's probably not worth the trouble.  It helps to
        > > introduce the filler rod out of the arc flame. Experience will come
        > > with practice.  Mig is out of the question on the thickness of
        > > material
        > > your dealing with.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Craft+hobby&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby+a
        > nd+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hypertherm
        >
        > +plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=6py6HE4wv39MnVtZx1Quj
        > Q>Craft hobby
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w1=Craft+hobby
        > &w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5
        > =Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=fez4g8Ksge
        > w7Pj2vfoFK4w>Hobby and craft supply
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Craft+project&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby
        > +and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hyperthe
        >
        > rm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=MHkn_N8ejGtc5vi8L5a
        > hFw>Craft project
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ornamental+iron+railings&w1=Craft+hob
        > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&
        > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=Iqy-ali5
        > nnsqoXD-uCQh5w>Ornamental iron railings
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w1=Craft+hob
        > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&
        > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=BHJxqk6E
        > 8tzJnofcXWQn_w>Hypertherm plasma cutter
        >
        >
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ornamental+ironwork&w1=Craft+hobby&w2
        > =Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hy
        > pertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=eLvS_KDvlqylZ
        > QXh0XIjoA>Ornamental ironwork
        >
        >
        > ----------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        > *  Visit your group
        > "<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/welding_group>welding_group" on the web.
        > *  
        >
        > *  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > *
        >  <mailto:welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
        > welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > *  
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        > *  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
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      • Richard Lutz
        See this is why I love the yahoo groups. You can get the answers you need. I am a member of some other groups that share info and owner on one for trim
        Message 3 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
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          See this is why I love the yahoo groups. You can get the answers you
          need. I am a member of some other groups that share info and owner on
          one for trim restoration. I am also a steam engineer among other
          things if I can help I will. Thanks. Elrod.



          --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "dennis rapp" <bvwelding@e...>
          wrote:
          > I have used older tig machines that are not "high end" . They do
          not perform as well on the more difficult thin gauges. Three phase
          machines are not any smoother on the low end and are not any
          advantage to what your trying to do. What your are trying to do is
          not easy, In my opinion you need a small" Hi End" machine with very
          good low amp performance -220 v single phase -you will probably want
          to backsheild the stainless. Color matching will be trial and
          error ----- Original Message -----
          From: Richard Lutz
          > To: welding_group@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 9:37 PM
          > Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help
          >
          >
          > Pot metal is not my problem. I have discovered multiple ways to
          deal
          > with it for replating and none of them include welding. My
          problem has
          > been with stainless and aluminum trim pieces that are not plated.
          They
          > are very thin and easily stressed by the heat. Also color
          matching can
          > be very difficult with even new stuff. Picture a mirror. Dirty
          you
          > don't notice imperfections or another dirty spot. Clean you
          notice the
          > most minute flaw or spec. TIG may be my best bet as you mention
          because
          > I can use a scrap piece(of which I have many)from the same era as
          > my "filler" rod. Now back to my original questions on the size,
          power
          > and gasses. Do I need a high end machine for a few seconds weld
          on thin
          > stuff? Does higher voltage supply and or multiple phases give
          smoother
          > or better control? Enough to make a difference? I am no ordinary
          dummy!
          > I am an extrordinary dummy! I just ain'''''''t up on welding. So
          by
          > robbing you'se guys minds I hope to save some trial and error and
          maybe
          > some expence. Thanks. Elrod.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "bvweld" <bvwelding@e...>
          wrote:
          > > Hi, I'm new to this group also. You will have to use tig. I
          have a
          > > Miller syncrowave 250 and a Dynasty 300 DX. If you're sure you
          have
          > > aluminum and not pot metal (zinc alloy) it can be done. I have
          welded
          > > thin ga. aluminum down to welding two pop cans together for
          grins.
          > > You
          > > can use copper strips for backer's. I have had mixed results
          with pot
          > > metal. As stated the zinc will make it difficult. Unless it
          is an
          > > irreplacable item it's probably not worth the trouble. It
          helps to
          > > introduce the filler rod out of the arc flame. Experience will
          come
          > > with practice. Mig is out of the question on the thickness of
          > > material
          > > your dealing with.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > SPONSORED LINKS Craft hobby Hobby and craft supply Craft
          project
          > Ornamental iron railings Hypertherm plasma cutter
          Ornamental ironwork
          >
          >
          > --------------------------------------------------------------------
          ----------
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          > a.. Visit your group "welding_group" on the web.
          >
          > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
          of Service.
          >
          >
          > --------------------------------------------------------------------
          ----------
        • Richard Lutz
          I have a tendency to overheat that way. That is an art in itself and takes a touch I seem to be lacking. Thanks though. Elrod. ... welder. ... posts ...
          Message 4 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            I have a tendency to overheat that way. That is an art in itself and
            takes a touch I seem to be lacking. Thanks though. Elrod.



            --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "Johnny" <jd72cv11@y...> wrote:
            > Elrod,
            >
            > There's also the old tried and true oxy-fuel welding. :-) You might
            > already have the equipment and just need the consumables.
            >
            > Thank you for shopping at Walmart, please come again...
            > Johnathan
            >
            >
            > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Lutz" <elrod00@e...>
            wrote:
            > > I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a
            welder.
            > > So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past
            posts
            > > to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I
            restore old
            > > auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the
            holes
            > > in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go
            mig or
            > > tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better
            control?
            > > I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
            > > voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize
            to
            > > refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you
            have
            > > ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this
            then
            > > I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at
            a
            > > time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.
          • Richard Lutz
            Shielding gas on the back? Elrod. ... acquire the AC ... would be best ... on the ... the alloy is ... for ... not ... are ... your ... need a ... v single
            Message 5 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
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              Shielding gas on the back? Elrod.



              --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "C. J. Frederick"
              <cfrederick@n...> wrote:
              > There are very few 3 phase TIG machines. They use one phase to
              acquire the AC
              > wave. A small inverter machine that generates a square AC wave
              would be best
              > for low amperage welding on thin materials. Having a shielding gas
              on the
              > back
              > side is a great idea, especially with the SS. I don't know what
              the alloy is
              > for aluminum trim but if it is 6061 you can't use a piece of scrap
              for
              > filler.
              > It will crack.
              >
              > CJ
              >
              > >
              > > I have used older tig machines that are not "high end" .  They do
              not
              > perform
              > > as well on the more difficult thin gauges.  Three phase machines
              are
              > > not any smoother on the low end and are not any advantage to what
              your
              > trying
              > > to do. What your are trying to do is not easy,  In my opinion you
              need a
              > > small" Hi End" machine with very good low amp performance -220
              v single
              > phase
              > > -you will probably want to backsheild the stainless.  Color
              matching will be
              > > trial and error                                 ----- Original
              Message -----
              > >                                     From:
              > > <mailto:elrod00@e...>Richard Lutz
              > >>
              > >> To:
              <mailto:welding_group@yahoogroups.com>welding_group@yahoogroups.com
              > >> Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 9:37 PM
              > >> Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help
              > >>
              > >
              > > Pot metal is not my problem. I have discovered multiple ways to
              deal
              > > with it for replating and none of them include welding. My
              problem has
              > > been with stainless and aluminum trim pieces that are not plated.
              They
              > > are very thin and easily stressed by the heat. Also color
              matching can
              > > be very difficult with even new stuff. Picture a mirror. Dirty
              you
              > > don't notice imperfections or another dirty spot. Clean you
              notice the
              > > most minute flaw or spec. TIG may be my best bet as you mention
              because
              > > I can use a scrap piece(of which I have many)from the same era as
              > > my "filler" rod. Now back to my original questions on the size,
              power
              > > and gasses. Do I need a high end machine for a few seconds weld
              on thin
              > > stuff? Does higher voltage supply and or multiple phases give
              smoother
              > > or better control? Enough to make a difference? I am no ordinary
              dummy!
              > > I am an extrordinary dummy! I just ain'''''''t up on welding. So
              by
              > > robbing you'se guys minds I hope to save some trial and error and
              maybe
              > > some expence. Thanks. Elrod.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "bvweld" <bvwelding@e...>
              wrote:
              > > > Hi, I'm new to this group also. You will have to use tig.  I
              have a
              > > > Miller syncrowave 250 and a Dynasty 300 DX. If you're sure you
              have
              > > > aluminum and not pot metal (zinc alloy) it can be done. I have
              welded
              > > > thin ga. aluminum down to welding two pop cans together for
              grins.
              > > > You
              > > > can use copper strips for backer's. I have had mixed results
              with pot
              > > > metal.  As stated the zinc will make it difficult.  Unless it
              is an
              > > > irreplacable item it's probably not worth the trouble.  It
              helps to
              > > > introduce the filler rod out of the arc flame. Experience will
              come
              > > > with practice.  Mig is out of the question on the thickness of
              > > > material
              > > > your dealing with.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > SPONSORED LINKS
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Craft+hobby&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby+a
              > >
              nd+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hypert
              herm
              > >
              > >
              +plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=6py6HE4wv39MnVtZx
              1Quj
              > > Q>Craft hobby
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w1=Craft+hobby
              > >
              &w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railing
              s&w5
              > >
              =Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=fez4g8
              Ksge
              > > w7Pj2vfoFK4w>Hobby and craft supply
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Craft+project&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby
              > >
              +and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hype
              rthe
              > >
              > >
              rm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=MHkn_N8ejGtc5vi
              8L5a
              > > hFw>Craft project
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Ornamental+iron+railings&w1=Craft+hob
              > >
              by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
              ngs&
              > >
              w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=Iqy-
              ali5
              > > nnsqoXD-uCQh5w>Ornamental iron railings
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w1=Craft+hob
              > >
              by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
              ngs&
              > >
              w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=BHJx
              qk6E
              > > 8tzJnofcXWQn_w>Hypertherm plasma cutter
              > >
              > >
              > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
              t=ms&k=Ornamental+ironwork&w1=Craft+hobby&w2
              > >
              =Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w
              5=Hy
              > >
              pertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=eLvS_KDvl
              qylZ
              > > QXh0XIjoA>Ornamental ironwork
              > >
              > >
              > > ----------
              > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              > >
              > > *  Visit your group
              > > "<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/welding_group>welding_group"
              on the web.
              > > *  
              > >
              > > *  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > *
              > >  <mailto:welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?
              subject=Unsubscribe>
              > > welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > *  
              > >
              > > *  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              > > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              > >
              > > ----------
            • C. J. Frederick
              Yep, commonly used for pipe welding SS and other active metals. The back side of a thin piece gets almost as hot as the puddle (sometimes it does and falls
              Message 6 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Yep, commonly used for pipe welding SS and other active metals. The back side
                of a thin piece gets almost as hot as the puddle (sometimes it does and falls
                out :-) so it can be contaminated from the air just like the arc side if your
                gas quit. Most machines that weld seams have a backing strip with a trough
                and
                holes in it that is hooked to a shielding gas source and feeds shielding gas
                over the back of the weld. The arc side gets the gas from the welding
                torch or
                gun.

                CJ


                >
                > Shielding gas on the back? Elrod.
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "C. J. Frederick"
                > <cfrederick@n...> wrote:
                > > There are very few 3 phase TIG machines.  They use one phase to
                > acquire the AC
                > > wave.  A small inverter machine that generates a square AC wave
                > would be best
                > > for low amperage welding on thin materials.  Having a shielding gas
                > on the
                > > back
                > > side is a great idea, especially with the SS.  I don't know what
                > the alloy is
                > > for aluminum trim but if it is 6061 you can't use a piece of scrap
                > for
                > > filler.
                > > It will crack.
                > >
                > > CJ
                > >
                > > >
                > > > I have used older tig machines that are not "high end" .  They do
                > not
                > > perform
                > > > as well on the more difficult thin gauges.  Three phase machines
                > are
                > > > not any smoother on the low end and are not any advantage to what
                > your
                > > trying
                > > > to do. What your are trying to do is not easy,  In my opinion you
                > need a
                > > > small" Hi End" machine with very good low amp performance -220
                > v single
                > > phase
                > > > -you will probably want to backsheild the stainless.  Color
                > matching will be
                > > > trial and error                                 ----- Original
                > Message -----
                > > >                                     From:
                > > > <mailto:elrod00@e...>Richard Lutz
                > > >>
                > > >> To:
                >
                > <<mailto:welding_group@yahoogroups.com>mailto:welding_group@...
                > m>welding_group@yahoogroups.com
                > > >> Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 9:37 PM
                > > >> Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help
                > > >>
                > > >
                > > > Pot metal is not my problem. I have discovered multiple ways to
                > deal
                > > > with it for replating and none of them include welding. My
                > problem has
                > > > been with stainless and aluminum trim pieces that are not plated.
                > They
                > > > are very thin and easily stressed by the heat. Also color
                > matching can
                > > > be very difficult with even new stuff. Picture a mirror. Dirty
                > you
                > > > don't notice imperfections or another dirty spot. Clean you
                > notice the
                > > > most minute flaw or spec. TIG may be my best bet as you mention
                > because
                > > > I can use a scrap piece(of which I have many)from the same era as
                > > > my "filler" rod. Now back to my original questions on the size,
                > power
                > > > and gasses. Do I need a high end machine for a few seconds weld
                > on thin
                > > > stuff? Does higher voltage supply and or multiple phases give
                > smoother
                > > > or better control? Enough to make a difference? I am no ordinary
                > dummy!
                > > > I am an extrordinary dummy! I just ain'''''''t up on welding. So
                > by
                > > > robbing you'se guys minds I hope to save some trial and error and
                > maybe
                > > > some expence. Thanks. Elrod.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "bvweld" <bvwelding@e...>
                > wrote:
                > > > > Hi, I'm new to this group also. You will have to use tig.  I
                > have a
                > > > > Miller syncrowave 250 and a Dynasty 300 DX. If you're sure you
                > have
                > > > > aluminum and not pot metal (zinc alloy) it can be done. I have
                > welded
                > > > > thin ga. aluminum down to welding two pop cans together for
                > grins.
                > > > > You
                > > > > can use copper strips for backer's. I have had mixed results
                > with pot
                > > > > metal.  As stated the zinc will make it difficult.  Unless it
                > is an
                > > > > irreplacable item it's probably not worth the trouble.  It
                > helps to
                > > > > introduce the filler rod out of the arc flame. Experience will
                > come
                > > > > with practice.  Mig is out of the question on the thickness of
                > > > > material
                > > > > your dealing with.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > SPONSORED LINKS
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Craft+hobby&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby+a
                > > >
                > nd+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hypert
                > herm
                > > >
                > > >
                > +plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=6py6HE4wv39MnVtZx
                > 1Quj
                > > > Q>Craft hobby
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w1=Craft+hobby
                > > >
                > &w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railing
                > s&w5
                > > >
                > =Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=fez4g8
                > Ksge
                > > > w7Pj2vfoFK4w>Hobby and craft supply
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Craft+project&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby
                > > >
                > +and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hype
                > rthe
                > > >
                > > >
                > rm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=MHkn_N8ejGtc5vi
                > 8L5a
                > > > hFw>Craft project
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Ornamental+iron+railings&w1=Craft+hob
                > > >
                > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
                > ngs&
                > > >
                > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=Iqy-
                > ali5
                > > > nnsqoXD-uCQh5w>Ornamental iron railings
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w1=Craft+hob
                > > >
                > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
                > ngs&
                > > >
                > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=BHJx
                > qk6E
                > > > 8tzJnofcXWQn_w>Hypertherm plasma cutter
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > <<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?>http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                > t=ms&k=Ornamental+ironwork&w1=Craft+hobby&w2
                > > >
                > =Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w
                > 5=Hy
                > > >
                > pertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=eLvS_KDvl
                > qylZ
                > > > QXh0XIjoA>Ornamental ironwork
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ----------
                > > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                > > >
                > > >    *  Visit your group
                > > >   
                > "<<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/welding_group>http://groups.yahoo.com/gro
                > up/welding_group>welding_group"
                > on the web.
                > > >    *  
                > > >
                > > >    *  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > >    *
                > > >     <mailto:welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?
                > subject=Unsubscribe>
                > > >    welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > > >    *  
                > > >
                > > >    *  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > > >   
                > <<http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo!
                > Terms of Service.
                > > >
                > > > ----------
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > SPONSORED LINKS
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Craft+hobby&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby+a
                > nd+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hypertherm
                >
                > +plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=6py6HE4wv39MnVtZx1Quj
                > Q>Craft hobby
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w1=Craft+hobby
                > &w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5
                > =Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=fez4g8Ksge
                > w7Pj2vfoFK4w>Hobby and craft supply
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Craft+project&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby
                > +and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hyperthe
                >
                > rm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=MHkn_N8ejGtc5vi8L5a
                > hFw>Craft project
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ornamental+iron+railings&w1=Craft+hob
                > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&
                > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=Iqy-ali5
                > nnsqoXD-uCQh5w>Ornamental iron railings
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w1=Craft+hob
                > by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&
                > w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=BHJxqk6E
                > 8tzJnofcXWQn_w>Hypertherm plasma cutter
                >
                >
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ornamental+ironwork&w1=Craft+hobby&w2
                > =Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hy
                > pertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=eLvS_KDvlqylZ
                > QXh0XIjoA>Ornamental ironwork
                >
                >
                >
                > ----------
                > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                >
                > *  Visit your group
                > "<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/welding_group>welding_group" on the web.
                > *  
                >
                > *  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > *
                >  <mailto:welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                > welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > *  
                >
                > *  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                >
                > ----------
              • dennis rapp
                It s called backshielding on stainless. It prevents oxidation the same as your sheilding gas on the tig torch. This does not come into play on your aluminum
                Message 7 of 24 , Aug 9, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  It's called backshielding on stainless.  It prevents oxidation the same as your sheilding gas on the tig torch.  This does not come into play on your aluminum trim.  This oxidation you get from high temp oxidation due to lack of inert shielding  some people call "sugar" and will effect your weld quality as well as your appearance.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 7:02 PM
                  Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help

                  Shielding gas on the back? Elrod.



                  --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "C. J. Frederick"
                  <cfrederick@n...> wrote:
                  > There are very few 3 phase TIG machines.  They use one phase to
                  acquire the AC
                  > wave.  A small inverter machine that generates a square AC wave
                  would be best
                  > for low amperage welding on thin materials.  Having a shielding gas
                  on the
                  > back
                  > side is a great idea, especially with the SS.  I don't know what
                  the alloy is
                  > for aluminum trim but if it is 6061 you can't use a piece of scrap
                  for
                  > filler.
                  > It will crack.
                  >
                  > CJ
                  >
                  > >
                  > > I have used older tig machines that are not "high end" .  They do
                  not
                  > perform
                  > > as well on the more difficult thin gauges.  Three phase machines
                  are
                  > > not any smoother on the low end and are not any advantage to what
                  your
                  > trying
                  > > to do. What your are trying to do is not easy,  In my opinion you
                  need a
                  > > small" Hi End" machine with very good low amp performance -220
                  v single
                  > phase
                  > > -you will probably want to backsheild the stainless.  Color
                  matching will be
                  > > trial and error                                 ----- Original
                  Message -----
                  > >                                     From:
                  > > <mailto:elrod00@e...>Richard Lutz
                  > >>
                  > >> To:
                  <mailto:welding_group@yahoogroups.com>welding_group@yahoogroups.com
                  > >> Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 9:37 PM
                  > >> Subject: [welding_group] Re: Newbie Help
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > > Pot metal is not my problem. I have discovered multiple ways to
                  deal
                  > > with it for replating and none of them include welding. My
                  problem has
                  > > been with stainless and aluminum trim pieces that are not plated.
                  They
                  > > are very thin and easily stressed by the heat. Also color
                  matching can
                  > > be very difficult with even new stuff. Picture a mirror. Dirty
                  you
                  > > don't notice imperfections or another dirty spot. Clean you
                  notice the
                  > > most minute flaw or spec. TIG may be my best bet as you mention
                  because
                  > > I can use a scrap piece(of which I have many)from the same era as
                  > > my "filler" rod. Now back to my original questions on the size,
                  power
                  > > and gasses. Do I need a high end machine for a few seconds weld
                  on thin
                  > > stuff? Does higher voltage supply and or multiple phases give
                  smoother
                  > > or better control? Enough to make a difference? I am no ordinary
                  dummy!
                  > > I am an extrordinary dummy! I just ain'''''''t up on welding. So
                  by
                  > > robbing you'se guys minds I hope to save some trial and error and
                  maybe
                  > > some expence. Thanks. Elrod.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "bvweld" <bvwelding@e...>
                  wrote:
                  > > > Hi, I'm new to this group also. You will have to use tig.  I
                  have a
                  > > > Miller syncrowave 250 and a Dynasty 300 DX. If you're sure you
                  have
                  > > > aluminum and not pot metal (zinc alloy) it can be done. I have
                  welded
                  > > > thin ga. aluminum down to welding two pop cans together for
                  grins.
                  > > > You
                  > > > can use copper strips for backer's. I have had mixed results
                  with pot
                  > > > metal.  As stated the zinc will make it difficult.  Unless it
                  is an
                  > > > irreplacable item it's probably not worth the trouble.  It
                  helps to
                  > > > introduce the filler rod out of the arc flame. Experience will
                  come
                  > > > with practice.  Mig is out of the question on the thickness of
                  > > > material
                  > > > your dealing with.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > SPONSORED LINKS
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Craft+hobby&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby+a
                  > >
                  nd+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hypert
                  herm
                  > >
                  > >
                  +plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=6py6HE4wv39MnVtZx
                  1Quj
                  > > Q>Craft hobby
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w1=Craft+hobby
                  > >
                  &w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railing
                  s&w5
                  > >
                  =Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=fez4g8
                  Ksge
                  > > w7Pj2vfoFK4w>Hobby and craft supply
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Craft+project&w1=Craft+hobby&w2=Hobby
                  > >
                  +and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w5=Hype
                  rthe
                  > >
                  > >
                  rm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=MHkn_N8ejGtc5vi
                  8L5a
                  > > hFw>Craft project
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Ornamental+iron+railings&w1=Craft+hob
                  > >
                  by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
                  ngs&
                  > >
                  w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=Iqy-
                  ali5
                  > > nnsqoXD-uCQh5w>Ornamental iron railings
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w1=Craft+hob
                  > >
                  by&w2=Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+raili
                  ngs&
                  > >
                  w5=Hypertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=BHJx
                  qk6E
                  > > 8tzJnofcXWQn_w>Hypertherm plasma cutter
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?
                  t=ms&k=Ornamental+ironwork&w1=Craft+hobby&w2
                  > >
                  =Hobby+and+craft+supply&w3=Craft+project&w4=Ornamental+iron+railings&w
                  5=Hy
                  > >
                  pertherm+plasma+cutter&w6=Ornamental+ironwork&c=6&s=149&.sig=eLvS_KDvl
                  qylZ
                  > > QXh0XIjoA>Ornamental ironwork
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ----------
                  > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  > >
                  > >    *  Visit your group
                  > >    "<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/welding_group>welding_group"
                  on the web.
                  > >    *  
                  > >
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                  > >    *
                  > >     <mailto:welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?
                  subject=Unsubscribe>
                  > >    welding_group-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > >    *  
                  > >
                  > >    *  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                  > >    <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                  > >
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                • Rafael Vidal
                  Hey Rich., A 220 TIG machine will do you just right. I have a Lincoln Precision 185 and it pretty much does everything I ask of it. From welding Pepsi cans
                  Message 8 of 24 , Aug 11, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hey Rich., A 220 TIG machine will do you just right. I have a Lincoln Precision 185 and it pretty much does everything I ask of it. From welding Pepsi cans together to tool box fabrication and aluminum handrails and tubing. i would rather have a little more power so as to make the work go a little faster at times. TIG is the cleaner of the two processes (compared to MIG) and its rather straight forward once you cover all the bases. Aluminum can be tricky, but I've found that it's usually something I've overlooked when it goes bad. Know your material type, make sure you're running argon, weld with pure tungston, and control the heat with creativity. From strapping it on a thicker piece of aluminum so it can shunt the heat away to welding on copper plates (makes filling those holes a breeze, aluminum doesn't stick to copper). Ever think of submerging the aluminum in water leaving just what needs the weld above the surface. the also make some Forget about back flowing your aluminum, it will do nothing. Just start slow and watch for the shine, the aluminum surface shine. Another thing is that people take for granted that they are welding aluminum and all aluminum is the same, guess what, automotive aluminum is pityfull, it's the cheapest material going. Pick a good versitile aluminum rod. Remember these items were not intended to be repaired! So no attempt was ever made to make it easy! Some mold and recast with molten aluminum! Most of those aluminum casting are from sand molds, and thats a rough, dirty, impregnated process and it shows when you try to weld it. But keep at it, if there's a will there's a way.

                    Richard Lutz <elrod00@...> wrote:
                    I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a welder.
                    So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past posts
                    to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore old
                    auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the holes
                    in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig or
                    tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better control?
                    I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
                    voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
                    refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you have
                    ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this then
                    I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
                    time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.






                    Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
                  • Richard Lutz Jr
                    I think I ll save this email. Thanks! I ll let everyone know how my research goes. Was out looking at welders tonight. I have the TIG supplies. Just need the
                    Message 9 of 24 , Aug 11, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I think I'll save this email. Thanks! I'll let everyone know how my research goes. Was out looking at welders tonight. I have the TIG supplies. Just need the power source and gas. ThanksAgain. Elrod.
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2005 7:05 PM
                      Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                      Hey Rich., A 220 TIG machine will do you just right. I have a Lincoln Precision 185 and it pretty much does everything I ask of it. From welding Pepsi cans together to tool box fabrication and aluminum handrails and tubing. i would rather have a little more power so as to make the work go a little faster at times. TIG is the cleaner of the two processes (compared to MIG) and its rather straight forward once you cover all the bases. Aluminum can be tricky, but I've found that it's usually something I've overlooked when it goes bad. Know your material type, make sure you're running argon, weld with pure tungston, and control the heat with creativity. From strapping it on a thicker piece of aluminum so it can shunt the heat away to welding on copper plates (makes filling those holes a breeze, aluminum doesn't stick to copper). Ever think of submerging the aluminum in water leaving just what needs the weld above the surface. the also make some Forget about back flowing your aluminum, it will do nothing. Just start slow and watch for the shine, the aluminum surface shine. Another thing is that people take for granted that they are welding aluminum and all aluminum is the same, guess what, automotive aluminum is pityfull, it's the cheapest material going. Pick a good versitile aluminum rod. Remember these items were not intended to be repaired! So no attempt was ever made to make it easy! Some mold and recast with molten aluminum! Most of those aluminum casting are from sand molds, and thats a rough, dirty, impregnated process and it shows when you try to weld it. But keep at it, if there's a will there's a way.

                      Richard Lutz <elrod00@...> wrote:
                      I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a welder.
                      So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past posts
                      to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore old
                      auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the holes
                      in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig or
                      tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better control?
                      I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
                      voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
                      refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you have
                      ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this then
                      I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
                      time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.






                      Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

                    • T Peerson: Infinite Vision Productions
                      Anyone out there using an HTP America TIG? Their Invertig 201 AC/DC looks pretty sweet. I was planning on buying a Lincoln or Miller at the Street Rod
                      Message 10 of 24 , Aug 11, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Anyone out there using an HTP America TIG? Their Invertig 201 AC/DC looks pretty sweet. I was planning on buying a Lincoln or Miller at the Street Rod Nationals that's held in Louisville (it was just this past week). Both companies have booths set up where you can demo their machines. A couple weeks ago I remembered the HTP catalog I got back in 2003, and reading about the Invertig's. Suffice it to say that I didn't attend the show! Any input?

                        Tim P.
                         
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2005 7:25 PM
                        Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                        I think I'll save this email. Thanks! I'll let everyone know how my research goes. Was out looking at welders tonight. I have the TIG supplies. Just need the power source and gas. ThanksAgain. Elrod.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2005 7:05 PM
                        Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                        Hey Rich., A 220 TIG machine will do you just right. I have a Lincoln Precision 185 and it pretty much does everything I ask of it. From welding Pepsi cans together to tool box fabrication and aluminum handrails and tubing. i would rather have a little more power so as to make the work go a little faster at times. TIG is the cleaner of the two processes (compared to MIG) and its rather straight forward once you cover all the bases. Aluminum can be tricky, but I've found that it's usually something I've overlooked when it goes bad. Know your material type, make sure you're running argon, weld with pure tungston, and control the heat with creativity. From strapping it on a thicker piece of aluminum so it can shunt the heat away to welding on copper plates (makes filling those holes a breeze, aluminum doesn't stick to copper). Ever think of submerging the aluminum in water leaving just what needs the weld above the surface. the also make some Forget about back flowing your aluminum, it will do nothing. Just start slow and watch for the shine, the aluminum surface shine. Another thing is that people take for granted that they are welding aluminum and all aluminum is the same, guess what, automotive aluminum is pityfull, it's the cheapest material going. Pick a good versitile aluminum rod. Remember these items were not intended to be repaired! So no attempt was ever made to make it easy! Some mold and recast with molten aluminum! Most of those aluminum casting are from sand molds, and thats a rough, dirty, impregnated process and it shows when you try to weld it. But keep at it, if there's a will there's a way.

                        Richard Lutz <elrod00@...> wrote:
                        I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a welder.
                        So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past posts
                        to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore old
                        auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the holes
                        in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig or
                        tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better control?
                        I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
                        voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
                        refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you have
                        ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this then
                        I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
                        time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.






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                      • woolerys
                        I have had one for about 4 months. I new nothing of tig welding. did know basic oxy-acy. i have used it on the mild steel projects but no aluminum yet. Have
                        Message 11 of 24 , Aug 12, 2005
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                          I have had one for about 4 months. I new nothing of tig welding. did know basic oxy-acy. i have used it on the mild steel projects but no aluminum yet.  Have no regrets, Call Jeff Noland at HTP.He is the owner of the company as well as an accomplished weldor and can any answer any questions. if it's in your price range you can't go wrong.90 day money back guarantee!! If you don't need aluminum capability they have a DC only model about a $1000 cheaper.
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Friday, August 12, 2005 12:42 AM
                          Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                          Anyone out there using an HTP America TIG? Their Invertig 201 AC/DC looks pretty sweet. I was planning on buying a Lincoln or Miller at the Street Rod Nationals that's held in Louisville (it was just this past week). Both companies have booths set up where you can demo their machines. A couple weeks ago I remembered the HTP catalog I got back in 2003, and reading about the Invertig's. Suffice it to say that I didn't attend the show! Any input?

                          Tim P.
                           
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2005 7:25 PM
                          Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                          I think I'll save this email. Thanks! I'll let everyone know how my research goes. Was out looking at welders tonight. I have the TIG supplies. Just need the power source and gas. ThanksAgain. Elrod.
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2005 7:05 PM
                          Subject: Re: [welding_group] Newbie Help

                          Hey Rich., A 220 TIG machine will do you just right. I have a Lincoln Precision 185 and it pretty much does everything I ask of it. From welding Pepsi cans together to tool box fabrication and aluminum handrails and tubing. i would rather have a little more power so as to make the work go a little faster at times. TIG is the cleaner of the two processes (compared to MIG) and its rather straight forward once you cover all the bases. Aluminum can be tricky, but I've found that it's usually something I've overlooked when it goes bad. Know your material type, make sure you're running argon, weld with pure tungston, and control the heat with creativity. From strapping it on a thicker piece of aluminum so it can shunt the heat away to welding on copper plates (makes filling those holes a breeze, aluminum doesn't stick to copper). Ever think of submerging the aluminum in water leaving just what needs the weld above the surface. the also make some Forget about back flowing your aluminum, it will do nothing. Just start slow and watch for the shine, the aluminum surface shine. Another thing is that people take for granted that they are welding aluminum and all aluminum is the same, guess what, automotive aluminum is pityfull, it's the cheapest material going. Pick a good versitile aluminum rod. Remember these items were not intended to be repaired! So no attempt was ever made to make it easy! Some mold and recast with molten aluminum! Most of those aluminum casting are from sand molds, and thats a rough, dirty, impregnated process and it shows when you try to weld it. But keep at it, if there's a will there's a way.

                          Richard Lutz <elrod00@...> wrote:
                          I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a welder.
                          So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past posts
                          to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore old
                          auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the holes
                          in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig or
                          tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better control?
                          I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
                          voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
                          refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you have
                          ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this then
                          I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
                          time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.






                          Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

                        • nickso2
                          I was in your same position about 5 months ago and asked some of the same questions here. I learned to stick weld from my dad when I was young and all I
                          Message 12 of 24 , Aug 26, 2005
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                            I was in your same position about 5 months ago and asked some of the
                            same questions here. I "learned" to stick weld from my dad when I was
                            young and all I remember was shaking loose the stuck rod.

                            I tried a Lincoln for a couple of months, but the quality of the unit
                            did not seem that good and the lead wires for the spool drive unit
                            were too short and based on all of this I returned the unit.

                            I then purchased a Hobart from Tractor Supply and could tell it was
                            better made than the Lincoln and so far I have been very happy.

                            No matter if you get a stick or Mig.....if you get a Mig and have the
                            extra money (about 70-80 for a hobby bottle) get the shielding gas!!

                            Hope this helps,
                            Nick















                            --- In welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Lutz" <elrod00@e...>
                            wrote:
                            > I joined this group hoping to get some advice. First I am NOT a
                            welder.
                            > So please excuse my dumb questions. I have tried to read the past
                            posts
                            > to get an idea. I have stuck pieces togeather. Barely! :P I restore
                            old
                            > auto trim. I would like to know which direction to go to weld the
                            holes
                            > in the aluminum trim that people drill to mount it. Should I go mig
                            or
                            > tig? This is thin stuff so would a smaller unit give me better
                            control?
                            > I can go 110/220 or 208 single or three phase. Is any particular
                            > voltage of an advantage? I already chemically strip the anodize to
                            > refinish it. I know it will take patience and practice but if you
                            have
                            > ever plated potmetal then you know I have these. If I can do this
                            then
                            > I want to move on to the same thing in stainless but one step at a
                            > time. Thanks for your help in advance. Elrod.
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