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is my garage too cold for argon?

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  • Jim
    For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or less in my unheated
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 2, 2007
      For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
      have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
      less in my unheated garage.

      Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow effectively?

      thanks-
    • Jerry Smith
      Argon is a liquid at -238 degree F. It could be your valves, or other things. Have you tried putting a heater in your garageto warm things up? Jerry
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 2, 2007
        Argon is a liquid at -238 degree F. It could be your
        valves, or other things. Have you tried putting a
        heater in your garageto warm things up?

        Jerry

        --- Jim <jwadsworth@...> wrote:

        > For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a
        > wire-feed welder--I
        > have not used the welder during the winter when it
        > is 20 degrees or
        > less in my unheated garage.
        >
        > Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does
        > not flow effectively?
        >
        > thanks-
        >
        >
      • Adam Nelson
        the metal is to cold Jim wrote: For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I have not used the
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 2, 2007
          the metal is to cold

          Jim <jwadsworth@...> wrote:
          For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
          have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
          less in my unheated garage.

          Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow effectively?

          thanks-



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        • C. J. Frederick
          ... No, its not the temperature. CJ
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 2, 2007
            >For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
            >have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
            >less in my unheated garage.
            >
            >Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow effectively?

            No, its not the temperature. CJ
          • Bill Rubenstein
            What s the possibility that it is the draft rather than the cold? Bill
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 3, 2007
              What's the possibility that it is the draft rather than the cold?

              Bill

              C. J. Frederick wrote:
              >
              >
              > >For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
              > >have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
              > >less in my unheated garage.
              > >
              > >Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow effectively?
              >
              > No, its not the temperature. CJ
              >
              >
            • C. J. Frederick
              Could be a draft. The shielding gas should lightly tumble out of the nozzle and push the air away from the weld. Try moving your weld gun very close to the
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 3, 2007
                Could be a draft. The shielding gas should lightly tumble out of the
                nozzle and push the air away from the weld. Try moving your weld gun
                very close to the puddle to see if there is an improvement in bead
                quality. Make sure you don't have the gas flow too high. At too
                high a flow, there will be turbulence at the weld that will draw in
                the surrounding air and make it look like there is not enough gas or
                it is a problem with contaminated gas. Did the problem start when
                you changed gas cylinders? Sometimes the cylinders aren't purged
                properly when refilled and the content is contaminated. CJ


                >What's the possibility that it is the draft rather than the cold?
                >
                >Bill
                >
                >C. J. Frederick wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > >For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
                > > >have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
                > > >less in my unheated garage.
                > > >
                > > >Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow effectively?
                > >
                > > No, its not the temperature. CJ
                > >
              • Don
                Is your material clean? that would cause it too Don
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 3, 2007
                  Is your material clean? that would cause it too
                  Don
                  --- "C. J. Frederick" <cfrederick@...> wrote:

                  > Could be a draft. The shielding gas should lightly tumble out of the
                  >
                  > nozzle and push the air away from the weld. Try moving your weld gun
                  >
                  > very close to the puddle to see if there is an improvement in bead
                  > quality. Make sure you don't have the gas flow too high. At too
                  > high a flow, there will be turbulence at the weld that will draw in
                  > the surrounding air and make it look like there is not enough gas or
                  > it is a problem with contaminated gas. Did the problem start when
                  > you changed gas cylinders? Sometimes the cylinders aren't purged
                  > properly when refilled and the content is contaminated. CJ
                  >
                  >
                  > >What's the possibility that it is the draft rather than the cold?
                  > >
                  > >Bill
                  > >
                  > >C. J. Frederick wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > >For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed
                  > welder--I
                  > > > >have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees
                  > or
                  > > > >less in my unheated garage.
                  > > > >
                  > > > >Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow
                  > effectively?
                  > > >
                  > > > No, its not the temperature. CJ
                  > > >
                  >
                  >
                • daveswelding
                  -In cold weather sometimes the rubber hoses will crack and leak and the valve may not open all the way causing a shortage of gas coverage in some older
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 1, 2008
                    -In cold weather sometimes the rubber hoses will crack and leak and the
                    valve may not open all the way causing a shortage of gas coverage in
                    some older machines. But cold weather souldn't affect the gas -- In
                    welding_group@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jwadsworth@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > For the first time I am seeing poor welds from a wire-feed welder--I
                    > have not used the welder during the winter when it is 20 degrees or
                    > less in my unheated garage.
                    >
                    > Is there a temperature point where Argon gas does not flow
                    effectively?
                    >
                    > thanks-
                    >
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