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Re: [welding_group] Burns

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  • Don
    The most advisable method of treating your burn effectively with a minimal scar, if any, would be to :post a picture of the affected area so I might further be
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 1, 2007
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      The most advisable method of treating your burn effectively with a
      minimal scar, if any, would be to :post a picture of the affected area
      so I might further be able to remedy this uncomfortable but interesting
      injury.:
      Don C


      --- Rich <oakhollowrich@...> wrote:

      > Dallas,
      >
      > You could use Neosporin or aloe vera (I'm not a doctor but these will
      >
      > help). OR......you could let it scar and have both a reminder to
      > protect yourself and a story to tell your grandkids!
      >
      > Rich
      >
      > weldingchickie wrote:
      > >
      > > What is the best thing to stop a burn from becoming a scar? I need
      > help
      > > the burn is on my chest an i don't want a scar. Mig overhead is
      > awful
      > > for getting burnt!
      > > Thanks
      > > Dallas
      > >
      > >
      >
    • metalworker.mike@gmail.com
      ... Rule #1 - 1st and 2nd degree burns do not tend to leave scars on their own. What causes scars is infection. The blisters that form on 2nd degree burns
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 2, 2007
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        On 2/27/07, weldingchickie <weldingchickie@...> wrote:
        What is the best thing to stop a burn from becoming a scar?

          Rule #1 - 1st and 2nd degree burns do not tend to leave scars on their own.  What causes scars is infection.  The blisters that form on 2nd degree burns are filled with sterile fluid.  Sterile fluid does not cause infection, so the most important rule is that you DO NOT BREAK THE BLISTERS because doing so opens the skin and allows germs to enter and potentially cause infection.  I don't care what your Aunt Gertie told you, you never never never break the blisters.  Keep the burn clean.  Use Polysporin Triple and plenty of it.  This will keep the burn moist and flexible so the skin won't crack, and it will also kill surface germs that might cause infection.  Cover the burn with a dressing so that dirt can't get to it, and change the dressing regularly and keep at it with the polysporin.  Oh, and don't break the blisters.  Did I say that already?  Doesn't matter - it's worth repeating.  I have suffered many burns, including one memorable event that netted me 1st & 2nd degree burns covering 40% of my body, including my face, chest and arms, and I have NO SCARS from that burn.  I have scars from other, small 3rd and higher degree burns, but that is unavoidable.  If the skin isn't broken then you will not have a scar as long as the burn doesn't get infected.  I had to keep working with my chest/arm burns (they took a while to completely go away), so I wore two shirts and duct-taped the sleeves to my wrists, and duct-taped around my neck so that dust couldn't get into my shirt.  For my face I had to just use copious Polysporin Triple and cover what I could with gauze and bandage.  I was lucky and had no infection, therefore I had NO SCARRING.
          I truly understand that a scar on your chest would be a tragedy, particularly for a WeldingChickie, but I'm sure you can understand that a scarred face would suck, too, and I was able to avoid that even though after the incided I had lips the size of bananas, and blisters all over my face.  So take this advice to heart because I KNOW OF WHAT I SPEAK.  I have been there and done that and come through the other side unscathed.  Use the Polysporin Triple to kill germs and keep the skin soft.  Keep the burn covered with a clean bandage at all times and avoid contaminating influences, and above all DON'T BREAK THE BLISTERS!

          I wish you a quick, scarless recovery.

        Oh, and often the easiest cure is prevention - add a short flap of leather to the bottom of your welding helmet (kind of like a goalie's neck guard) and that will ward off the slag drops without letting them slide down your neck, while not affecting your ability to look down at a puddle at the bench.

        Mike

          Oh, and aloe vera juice straight (i.e. by cutting a leaf and rubbing it on the skin) can cause scarring of tender skin like 2nd degree burns.  Be careful.

      • Dallas Gates
        hey Thanks for the advice. I had polyspron on it and the scab turned goo-ie. So i had to stop using it. But I think that the danger of scaring is over now.
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 6, 2007
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          hey
          Thanks for the advice. I had polyspron on it and the scab turned goo-ie. So i had to stop using it. But I think that the danger of scaring is over now.
          Anyway talk later
          ~Dallas

          metalworker.mike@... wrote:
          On 2/27/07, weldingchickie <weldingchickie@...> wrote:
          What is the best thing to stop a burn from becoming a scar?

            Rule #1 - 1st and 2nd degree burns do not tend to leave scars on their own.  What causes scars is infection.  The blisters that form on 2nd degree burns are filled with sterile fluid.  Sterile fluid does not cause infection, so the most important rule is that you DO NOT BREAK THE BLISTERS because doing so opens the skin and allows germs to enter and potentially cause infection.  I don't care what your Aunt Gertie told you, you never never never break the blisters.  Keep the burn clean.  Use Polysporin Triple and plenty of it.  This will keep the burn moist and flexible so the skin won't crack, and it will also kill surface germs that might cause infection.  Cover the burn with a dressing so that dirt can't get to it, and change the dressing regularly and keep at it with the polysporin.  Oh, and don't break the blisters.  Did I say that already?  Doesn't matter - it's worth repeating.  I have suffered many burns, including one memorable event that netted me 1st & 2nd degree burns covering 40% of my body, including my face, chest and arms, and I have NO SCARS from that burn.  I have scars from other, small 3rd and higher degree burns, but that is unavoidable.  If the skin isn't broken then you will not have a scar as long as the burn doesn't get infected.  I had to keep working with my chest/arm burns (they took a while to completely go away), so I wore two shirts and duct-taped the sleeves to my wrists, and duct-taped around my neck so that dust couldn't get into my shirt.  For my face I had to just use copious Polysporin Triple and cover what I could with gauze and bandage.  I was lucky and had no infection, therefore I had NO SCARRING.
            I truly understand that a scar on your chest would be a tragedy, particularly for a WeldingChickie, but I'm sure you can understand that a scarred face would suck, too, and I was able to avoid that even though after the incided I had lips the size of bananas, and blisters all over my face.  So take this advice to heart because I KNOW OF WHAT I SPEAK.  I have been there and done that and come through the other side unscathed.  Use the Polysporin Triple to kill germs and keep the skin soft.  Keep the burn covered with a clean bandage at all times and avoid contaminating influences, and above all DON'T BREAK THE BLISTERS!

            I wish you a quick, scarless recovery.

          Oh, and often the easiest cure is prevention - add a short flap of leather to the bottom of your welding helmet (kind of like a goalie's neck guard) and that will ward off the slag drops without letting them slide down your neck, while not affecting your ability to look down at a puddle at the bench.

          Mike

            Oh, and aloe vera juice straight (i.e. by cutting a leaf and rubbing it on the skin) can cause scarring of tender skin like 2nd degree burns.  Be careful.



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        • Alan Lubow
          Goo-ie is ok. If you have any question, show it to your doctor. Mike s advice here is excellent. Alan ... From: Dallas Gates To:
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 6, 2007
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            Goo-ie is ok.  If you have any question, show it to your doctor.  Mike's advice here is excellent.
             
            Alan
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2007 5:42 AM
            Subject: Re: [welding_group] Burns

            hey
            Thanks for the advice. I had polyspron on it and the scab turned goo-ie. So i had to stop using it. But I think that the danger of scaring is over now.
            Anyway talk later
            On 2/27/07, weldingchickie <weldingchickie@ yahoo.ca> wrote:
            What is the best thing to stop a burn from becoming a scar?

              Rule #1 - 1st and 2nd degree burns do not tend to leave scars on their own.  What causes scars is infection.  The blisters that form on 2nd degree burns are filled with sterile fluid.  Sterile fluid does not cause infection, so the most important rule is that you DO NOT BREAK THE BLISTERS because doing so opens the skin and allows germs to enter and potentially cause infection.  I don't care what your Aunt Gertie told you, you never never never break the blisters.  Keep the burn clean.  Use Polysporin Triple and plenty of it.  This will keep the burn moist and flexible so the skin won't crack, and it will also kill surface germs that might cause infection.  Cover the burn with a dressing so that dirt can't get to it, and change the dressing regularly and keep at it with the polysporin.  Oh, and don't break the blisters.  Did I say that already?  Doesn't matter - it's worth repeating.  I have suffered many burns, including one memorable event that netted me 1st & 2nd degree burns covering 40% of my body, including my face, chest and arms, and I have NO SCARS from that burn.  I have scars from other, small 3rd and higher degree burns, but that is unavoidable.  If the skin isn't broken then you will not have a scar as long as the burn doesn't get infected.  I had to keep working with my chest/arm burns (they took a while to completely go away), so I wore two shirts and duct-taped the sleeves to my wrists, and duct-taped around my neck so that dust couldn't get into my shirt.  For my face I had to just use copious Polysporin Triple and cover what I could with gauze and bandage.  I was lucky and had no infection, therefore I had NO SCARRING.
              I truly understand that a scar on your chest would be a tragedy, particularly for a WeldingChickie, but I'm sure you can understand that a scarred face would suck, too, and I was able to avoid that even though after the incided I had lips the size of bananas, and blisters all over my face.  So take this advice to heart because I KNOW OF WHAT I SPEAK.  I have been there and done that and come through the other side unscathed.  Use the Polysporin Triple to kill germs and keep the skin soft.  Keep the burn covered with a clean bandage at all times and avoid contaminating influences, and above all DON'T BREAK THE BLISTERS!

              I wish you a quick, scarless recovery.

            Oh, and often the easiest cure is prevention - add a short flap of leather to the bottom of your welding helmet (kind of like a goalie's neck guard) and that will ward off the slag drops without letting them slide down your neck, while not affecting your ability to look down at a puddle at the bench.

            Mike

              Oh, and aloe vera juice straight (i.e. by cutting a leaf and rubbing it on the skin) can cause scarring of tender skin like 2nd degree burns.  Be careful.



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          • Metalworker Mike
            ... Gooey is good. Gooey won t crack and allow infection in. Infection is bad. Keep it covered, keep it moist. When your body has built up enough new skin
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 6, 2007
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              Dallas Gates wrote:
              > hey
              > Thanks for the advice. I had polyspron on it and the scab turned goo-ie.
              > So i had to stop using it. But I think that the danger of scaring is
              > over now.

              Gooey is good. Gooey won't crack and allow infection in. Infection
              is bad. Keep it covered, keep it moist. When your body has built up
              enough new skin under the blisters the fluid will disappear and the
              blistered skin will be sloughed off in the natural cycle of things, and
              you will have clean, scar-free skin. I have many scars in areas that I
              didn't care about and didn't dress, but when you want to be scar-free
              you keep it covered with clean dressings and keep up with the polysporin.
              By the way, one gent mentioned that ice is good for first-aid for
              burns, and he is right. I didn't mention first aid in my response, but
              anything that will reduce the heat will help. Cold tap-water is
              excellent. On minor burns on my fingers where the skin is intact but I
              want to avoid a blister I will even just press the affected area to some
              cold steel, because it tends to be handy when I get small burns. When I
              had my 'big' burn I was under a shower-head with the water on full-blast
              cold-only within about 45 seconds, and that helped a great deal. Once
              my skin was cooled I had someone call ahead to the hospital and someone
              drove me there in a hurry. I had cold, wet, clean towels laid all over
              my burns, and that felt absolutely amazing. Every 10 or 15 minutes a
              nurse would come by to re-soak the towels. This is an excellent method
              of reducing the pain of the burn, but on large areas like I had this
              should only be done under the care of a competent person, because I got
              hypothermia from it. It only makes sense when you think about it... I'm
              lying half-naked with cold, wet towels all over me for hours. Of
              _course_ I got hypothermia, but I felt so _hot_ that I didn't notice
              until my teeth were chattering fit to break them, and I honestly didn't
              put two and two together, so I didn't know what the hell was happening
              to me, but the nurses knew what was going on and they were able to
              monitor me and make sure that the treatment wasn't worse than the
              disease, so to speak. On a smaller burn on one limb or something,
              obviously hypothermia isn't much of a risk. Anyways, the degree of the
              burn isn't always the most important factor in determining the severity
              of a burn - the surface area is very important. I would have much much
              rather had a 3rd degree burn a few inches square than the several square
              feet of 2nd degree that I had. 3rd degree burns are very likely to
              leave a scar, though.

              Mike
            • Dallas Gates
              It has started to scar now. I noticed it today cause i am picking at the scab! lol! But thats okay it really doesn t matter any more. That pic is of the burn
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 8, 2007
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                It has started to scar now. I noticed it today cause i am picking at the scab!
                lol! But thats okay it really doesn't matter any more. That pic is of the burn that i am talking about!\
                ~Dallas

                Metalworker Mike <metalworker.mike@...> wrote:
                Dallas Gates wrote:
                > hey
                > Thanks for the advice. I had polyspron on it and the scab turned goo-ie.
                > So i had to stop using it. But I think that the danger of scaring is
                > over now.

                Gooey is good. Gooey won't crack and allow infection in. Infection
                is bad. Keep it covered, keep it moist. When your body has built up
                enough new skin under the blisters the fluid will disappear and the
                blistered skin will be sloughed off in the natural cycle of things, and
                you will have clean, scar-free skin. I have many scars in areas that I
                didn't care about and didn't dress, but when you want to be scar-free
                you keep it covered with clean dressings and keep up with the polysporin.
                By the way, one gent mentioned that ice is good for first-aid for
                burns, and he is right. I didn't mention first aid in my response, but
                anything that will reduce the heat will help. Cold tap-water is
                excellent. On minor burns on my fingers where the skin is intact but I
                want to avoid a blister I will even just press the affected area to some
                cold steel, because it tends to be handy when I get small burns. When I
                had my 'big' burn I was under a shower-head with the water on full-blast
                cold-only within about 45 seconds, and that helped a great deal. Once
                my skin was cooled I had someone call ahead to the hospital and someone
                drove me there in a hurry. I had cold, wet, clean towels laid all over
                my burns, and that felt absolutely amazing. Every 10 or 15 minutes a
                nurse would come by to re-soak the towels. This is an excellent method
                of reducing the pain of the burn, but on large areas like I had this
                should only be done under the care of a competent person, because I got
                hypothermia from it. It only makes sense when you think about it... I'm
                lying half-naked with cold, wet towels all over me for hours. Of
                _course_ I got hypothermia, but I felt so _hot_ that I didn't notice
                until my teeth were chattering fit to break them, and I honestly didn't
                put two and two together, so I didn't know what the hell was happening
                to me, but the nurses knew what was going on and they were able to
                monitor me and make sure that the treatment wasn't worse than the
                disease, so to speak. On a smaller burn on one limb or something,
                obviously hypothermia isn't much of a risk. Anyways, the degree of the
                burn isn't always the most important factor in determining the severity
                of a burn - the surface area is very important. I would have much much
                rather had a 3rd degree burn a few inches square than the several square
                feet of 2nd degree that I had. 3rd degree burns are very likely to
                leave a scar, though.

                Mike


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