Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Fort Atkinson; Blackhawk Island

Expand Messages
  • LJ
    Greetings... Is there any history of paranormal activity at the Union Cemetery, just northwest of Blackhawk Island? LJ O :-)
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 2, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings...

      Is there any history of paranormal activity at the Union Cemetery,
      just northwest of Blackhawk Island?

      LJ O :-)
    • LJ
      ... Cemetery, ... Greetings... Blackhawk Island; a misnomer, it s actually a penninsula; is located west-southwest of Fort Atkinson, on the northeast corner of
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 2, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In weirdwi@y..., "LJ" <Ssofsky@a...> wrote:
        > Greetings...
        >
        > Is there any history of paranormal activity at the Union
        Cemetery,
        > just northwest of Blackhawk Island?
        >
        > LJ O :-)

        Greetings...

        Blackhawk Island; a misnomer, it's actually a penninsula; is
        located west-southwest of Fort Atkinson, on the northeast corner of
        Lake Koshkonong, along it's eastern side is the Rock River feeding
        into the lake.

        On the opposite side of the river is the General Atkinson Mound
        Group consisting of the eleven survivors of a once bigger seventy-two
        mound group. A tapering lineral and some conicals which can be
        considered burial mounds. A bird(hawk, eagle, goose?)and some turtle
        mounds which are effigy mounds, telling the story of the burials(the
        clan of those buried...their arrangement in the mound...or some sort
        of spiritual situation).

        A mile or two northeast of the "island" is the last remaining
        intaglio of Wisconsin. Increase Lapham's book "Antiquities of
        Wisconsin" notes this panther-shaped depression(the opposite of a
        mound)which he ran across in 1850. Some people feel intaglio is a
        different form of effigy. As for myself, I have to side with the
        other school of thought on this as it seems to be supported by
        excavations of mounds. Intaglio is the start of a mound, rather, they
        would dig before they mounded, if you catch my drift. We find
        intaglio because, for some reason, they didn't have time to finish!

        Add to that the lake and river with it's food source and
        transportation utility, the swampy areas which I suspect would
        provide an abundance of wild rice, fertile land for other crops, etc.
        All this seems to support a theory for a healthy-sized Amerindian
        population around the area of Blackhawk Island.

        To be continued,
        LJ O :-)
      • ssofsky
        Greetings... As promised, here I am back with a few more historical tidbits about the Lake Koshkonong/Blackhawk Island area. April 6, 1832, Black Sparrow
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 5, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Greetings...

          As promised, here I am back with a few more historical tidbits
          about the Lake Koshkonong/Blackhawk Island area.

          April 6, 1832, Black Sparrow Hawk(we know him as Black Hawk)led a
          small band of his starving compatriots across the Mississippi at
          Yellow Banks and into northern Illinois. They were heading to
          Prophet's Town on the Rock River to raise some corn and in autumn try
          to take back the land he ceded(read that was cheated out of)a few
          years previous if at all possible. News of the "invasion" spread like
          wildfire throughout Illinois and Wisconsin.

          It wasn't long after that a group of milita, 2500 strong, formed at
          what is now called Stillman's Creek. Black Hawk, recognizing that
          help promised from other tribes, was not forthcoming. He had no
          choice but to try to surrender. He sent a small group, under the
          white flag of truce with terms of surrender. Unfortunately, these
          terms were never discussed as the milita opened fire killing the
          whole group as they approached. With a small band of warriors, Black
          Hawk managed to easily route the milita, who seemed more interested
          in the whiskey barrel than the rifle barrel. With this victory in
          hand, Black Hawk moved the women and children 70 miles northeast, to
          the "trembling lands" around Lake Koshkonong. In those days, vast
          amounts of this area were swamp and not easily accessible by the
          white man. Perhaps this is proof of Blackhawk Island once actually
          being an island?

          Melinde, in an earlier post you mentioned something about
          encountering paranormal activity at Blackhawk Island. I know I'm
          dying to know what you encountered. I have a few more tales about the
          area, some have an unusual twist but at this point I think it's your
          turn to talk. Don't feel shy if you don't have some big Hollywood
          ghost story to tell, most ghost stories are mentions of a chance
          encounter and rarely exceed a line or two.

          Waiting with bated breath,
          LJ O :-)
          Madison Ghostseekers Society
        • Richard D. Hendricks
          Thanks, LJ, for all of the historical materials. Charles E. Brown collected some ghost tales of Blackhawk s and the Sac and Fox Indian crossing through
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 6, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks, LJ, for all of the historical materials.

            Charles E. Brown collected some ghost tales of Blackhawk's and the Sac
            and Fox Indian crossing through Madison, shortly after the time you
            referenced. Pursued by soldiers, the band made it's way up the chain of
            lakes, passing the Third Lake (Monona) and camping near the grounds of
            what's now the Capitol on the Isthmus. After a brief rest, they made
            their way down what's essentially State Street today, crossing up over
            Bascom Hill overlooking the Fourth Lake (Mendota) and along the ridges
            through Shorewood Hills and, ironically, today's Blackhawk Country
            Club. Weakened by fighting, disease, and malnutrition, many of the
            Indians died ahead of their pursuers. Brown collected stories that told
            how, for years after their passage, misty gray and white figures could
            still be seen laboring along the route, most usually on nights of the
            full moon. They were seen along Bascom Hill, and further along under
            the bluffs near Shorewood Hills.

            The east side of Madison, from Butler Street all the way past today's
            Yahara River, was essentially a marsh when the white settlers came here,
            as was much of the way along the chain of lakes. Modern agriculture,
            damming, and re-routing of water channels changed the contour of the
            landscape immensely. For example, from the early 1900s through the
            mid-70s, over 50% of wetlands in the Lake Mendota watershed were lost.
            With the massive construction boom since then, we've lost far more.

            As a weird trivia item: early plans for Madison called for a canal to
            be dug across the Isthmus to connect Mendota and Monona at its narrowest
            point. This would have more or less passed close to the Capitol
            building and the high prominence it sits on. Finally, when faced with
            the enormous task of excavating and removing hundreds of tons of rock,
            saner heads prevailed, and the channel was dug a few miles to the east,
            in the low, soft-soiled marsh land. The canal was longer, but much
            easier to build. A dam was put in by Barstow at the Tenney Locks, and
            Mendota raised four feet. The first building there was Madison's first
            mill to cut lumber and grind grain, thus encouraging Madison's boom in
            the 1850s. The second building constructed along the Yahara took
            advantage of the ground grain. It was a brewery. (One of many, which,
            sadly, have all been lost.)

            RDH

            ssofsky wrote:
            >
            > As promised, here I am back with a few more historical tidbits
            > about the Lake Koshkonong/Blackhawk Island area.
          • ssofsky
            Greetings Richard... Tis not a problem! As you well know history is my other passion, especially Madison history. But how can you tell the story of Madison
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 9, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              Greetings Richard...

              Tis not a problem! As you well know history is my other passion,
              especially Madison history. But how can you tell the story of Madison
              without including that of Wisconsin? I have to admit I'm a bit red-
              faced here not delving into the C. E. Brown files at the Historical
              Society and just relying on the bits and pieces that I would pickup
              from reading here and there. <sniff, sniff> I smell a new project
              coming on! Perhaps some of this material will come out next Friday?

              I have known about the Black Hawk(Macataimeshekiakiak)/Madison
              connection, it is well documented in both Henry Dodge's and Black
              Hawk's account of this, shall we say, police action. I have heard an
              account of Black Hawk's band laying in ambush in the area of Blair
              and East Washington. The militia blindly averted disaster when they
              decided to head off toward the Third Ridge district to set up camp.

              Recently, I read a book about the Blackhawk Mound Group by L. J.
              Markquardt. Facinating little booklet! In it he seems quite careful
              about attaching Black Hawk's wanderings to the area as it seems every
              burg with even a remote attachment to this war has it's Black Hawk's
              Cave, etc., a sort of "Washington slept here syndrome" if you will.

              In the now you got me started department: I believe the mill in
              question, Madison Mill, was opened in 1849 as a sawmill a year later
              the grist mill was added. The mill was owned by L. J. Farwell(what is
              it with this LJ/Madison thing?....gotta love it!). Farwell was
              responsible for the straightening and dredging of the Catfish(Yahara)
              River as well as other projects that pretty much changed the
              environment around Madison. Even though the wildlife undoubtedly
              didn't care for him; the Irish laborers(the choice minority of the
              day)loved him. His projects kept food on their tables! And their love
              for him, evidenced by his election as governor. By 1857, the Farwell-
              boom ended, just as it had for many other land speculators of the
              time, in financial ruin.

              That second building across Lodi Road(another of Farwell's
              projects...now Sherman Avenue)was undoubtedly the Rodermund/Hausmann
              Brewery. I believe(but not absolutely certain)that it was Hausmann
              that was somehow involved with the last of Madison's old breweries,
              the Fauerbach Brewery. Oh brother, I think I smell yet another
              project here, I hope this one comes complete with taste-testing!

              See you Friday,
              LJ O :-)

              --- In weirdwi@y..., "Richard D. Hendricks" <rdh@e...> wrote:
              > Thanks, LJ, for all of the historical materials.
              >
              > Charles E. Brown collected some ghost tales of Blackhawk's
              and the Sac
              > and Fox Indian crossing through Madison, shortly after the time you
              > referenced. Pursued by soldiers, the band made it's way up the
              chain of
              > lakes, passing the Third Lake (Monona) and camping near the grounds
              of
              > what's now the Capitol on the Isthmus. After a brief rest, they
              made
              > their way down what's essentially State Street today, crossing up
              over
              > Bascom Hill overlooking the Fourth Lake (Mendota) and along the
              ridges
              > through Shorewood Hills and, ironically, today's Blackhawk Country
              > Club. Weakened by fighting, disease, and malnutrition, many of the
              > Indians died ahead of their pursuers. Brown collected stories that
              told
              > how, for years after their passage, misty gray and white figures
              could
              > still be seen laboring along the route, most usually on nights of
              the
              > full moon. They were seen along Bascom Hill, and further along
              under
              > the bluffs near Shorewood Hills.
              >
              > The east side of Madison, from Butler Street all the way past
              today's
              > Yahara River, was essentially a marsh when the white settlers came
              here,
              > as was much of the way along the chain of lakes. Modern
              agriculture,
              > damming, and re-routing of water channels changed the contour of the
              > landscape immensely. For example, from the early 1900s through the
              > mid-70s, over 50% of wetlands in the Lake Mendota watershed were
              lost.
              > With the massive construction boom since then, we've lost far more.
              >
              > As a weird trivia item: early plans for Madison called for a
              canal to
              > be dug across the Isthmus to connect Mendota and Monona at its
              narrowest
              > point. This would have more or less passed close to the Capitol
              > building and the high prominence it sits on. Finally, when faced
              with
              > the enormous task of excavating and removing hundreds of tons of
              rock,
              > saner heads prevailed, and the channel was dug a few miles to the
              east,
              > in the low, soft-soiled marsh land. The canal was longer, but much
              > easier to build. A dam was put in by Barstow at the Tenney Locks,
              and
              > Mendota raised four feet. The first building there was Madison's
              first
              > mill to cut lumber and grind grain, thus encouraging Madison's boom
              in
              > the 1850s. The second building constructed along the Yahara took
              > advantage of the ground grain. It was a brewery. (One of many,
              which,
              > sadly, have all been lost.)
              >
              > RDH
              >
              > ssofsky wrote:
              > >
              > > As promised, here I am back with a few more historical tidbits
              > > about the Lake Koshkonong/Blackhawk Island area.
            • ssofsky
              Greetings... I just ran across this in the Gard/Sorden book, Wisconsin Lore . I have to wonder if this island that they speak of is Blackhawk Island. Before
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 29, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                Greetings...

                I just ran across this in the Gard/Sorden book, "Wisconsin Lore". I
                have to wonder if this island that they speak of is Blackhawk Island.

                "Before the Potawatomi came, Indians of the Sauk tribe lived on the
                shore of this lake. They had enemies, probably the Illinois, who once
                trapped a number of them on an island. They were unable to escape, as
                the island is partly surrounded by a large swamp. The Sauk were here
                exterminated by the arrows of the enemy, and some also perished
                through starvation."

                LJ O :-)
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.