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[webloggerusergroup] Re: "Journalistic Integrity"...

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  • Dan Lyke
    ... Well, if journalistic standards are all that you say they are, wouldn t a retraction of the first story, or at least an editorial comment linking the two,
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 13, 2001
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      info@... writes:
      > I don't understand. Are you implying that C|Net should have
      > discarded the second story because it didn't jibe with the first a
      > week earlier?

      Well, if journalistic standards are all that you say they are,
      wouldn't a retraction of the first story, or at least an editorial
      comment linking the two, as I'd expect to see in a 'blog I trusted.

      > Of course, a ton of bloggers didn't bother to check Google before
      > spreading that bogus Nostradamus quote around.

      I guess this is my real point: That just as I don't trust the Weekly
      World News, or the Washington Post, there are quite a few webloggers I
      don't trust.

      But for the few 'bloggers I do trust, I expect that I get a higher
      quality of data, faster, and with more of a chance of seeing a
      retraction if they discover that they're wrong, than with mainstream
      media.

      > > Although I think JRobb
      >
      > Who is JRobb?

      http://jrobb.userland.com/ , one of the two speculating people Dave
      Winer quoted yesterday. Incidentally, Dave is the only person on my
      daily reads who was printing speculation or speculating.

      > But a lot of emphasis has been placed upon how weblogs are somehow
      > better, revolutionary even. I just don't see it. At best, weblogs
      > are just as awful as the traditional media.

      Here's where we differ. At their worst, weblogs are much like the
      Weekly World News or the National Enquirer. Good primarily for
      entertainment value.

      But at their best, webloggers are more likely to be domain experts and
      more likely to be intelligent than your average journalist.

      As I see it, the only thing weblogging does is spread out the
      bell-curve, making it more likely that there'll be more area under
      both ends, and less in the middle, and makes the authors individually
      accountable for what they write.

      Dan
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