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Home Grown Blog Tools?

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  • Phillip Harrington
    Hey! So, enough about Blogger, Manilla, Moreover, GrayMatter, Live Jounal, and the rest... Who else out there besides me is using their home grown system for
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 7, 2001
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      Hey!

      So, enough about Blogger, Manilla, Moreover, GrayMatter, Live Jounal, and
      the rest...

      Who else out there besides me is using their home grown system for
      blogging? What tools/concepts are you using? Do you deal with templates?
      Databases? HTML done by hand? What? Are you categorizing? Archiving? Do you
      run an RSS feed?

      Me? I'm stuffing my entries into a [2]MySql database and parsing it out in
      PHP. I'm using a single table for all "content" on the site (based loosely
      around the Content Management chapter of Philip Greenspun's [1]Internet
      Application Workbook and some ideas from james.mcginn.org), including the
      blog, articles, comments and bboard system that I keep meaning to finish. I
      used to use Blogger but one day I changed my blog template from an html
      wrapper into a SQL Insert statement wrapper, published, slurped up the file
      into MySql and almost never looked back.

      [1] http://philip.greenspun.com/internet-application-workbook/
      [2] http://openacs.org/philosophy/why-not-mysql.html

      Phillip Harrington
      phil@...
      http://philsown.com/

      "The newest computer can merely compound, at speed, the oldest problem in
      the relations between human beings, and in the end the communicator will be
      confronted with the old problem, of what to say and how to say it." --
      Edward R Murrow
    • Mike Gunderloy
      Mine s all homegrown: Microsoft SQL Server with an Access front end for data entry, back end is all ASP pages running on IIS. Multiple tables, though only
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 7, 2001
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        Mine's all homegrown: Microsoft SQL Server with an Access front end for
        data entry, back end is all ASP pages running on IIS. Multiple tables,
        though only three for the weblog (items, categories, linking table), but
        there are various other database-backed pages on the site. If I need to
        edit the HTML I use either FrontPage or HomeSite depending on my mood
        and the particular need. If I ever wanted to sell the thing it would
        need serious cleanup, but it works for me.

        Mike Gunderloy
        http://www.larkfarm.com

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Phillip Harrington [mailto:phil@...]
        > Sent: Wednesday, November 07, 2001 7:40 PM
        > To: webloggerusergroup@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [webloggerusergroup] Home Grown Blog Tools?
        >
        >
        > Hey!
        >
        > So, enough about Blogger, Manilla, Moreover, GrayMatter, Live
        > Jounal, and
        > the rest...
        >
        > Who else out there besides me is using their home grown system for
        > blogging? What tools/concepts are you using? Do you deal with
        > templates?
        > Databases? HTML done by hand? What? Are you categorizing?
        > Archiving? Do you
        > run an RSS feed?
        >
      • Phillip Harrington
        ... Likewise! I m the other end of the OS spectrum on my personal site, but not out of any religiOuS religious zeal. At work of course it s all NT/win2billion
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 7, 2001
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          >If I ever wanted to sell the thing it would
          >need serious cleanup, but it works for me.

          Likewise! I'm the other end of the OS spectrum on my personal site, but not
          out of any religiOuS religious zeal. At work of course it's all
          NT/win2billion for the sake of ColdFusion and Sql server. As for clean up
          I'm always changing the way I do things as I learn more and more.

          Phil
        • wendy@webeck.net
          ... system for ... with templates? ... categorizing? Archiving? Do you ... I ve got a verrrrry basic PHP/MySQL thingy that I put together for fun and
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 8, 2001
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            --- In webloggerusergroup@y..., Phillip Harrington <phil@p...>
            > Who else out there besides me is using their home grown
            system for
            > blogging? What tools/concepts are you using? Do you deal
            with templates?
            > Databases? HTML done by hand? What? Are you
            categorizing? Archiving? Do you
            > run an RSS feed?

            I've got a verrrrry basic PHP/MySQL thingy that I put together for
            fun and educational value. All the posts are stored in one table
            and my stats are stored in another. I also have a table of users
            so I can give people accounts if they want. Archives are all on
            one page, no descriptions or anything.

            Basically, I built it and left it and make mental note of
            improvements I should make to it (search function, better
            archives, comments, prettier format, fix the bug in the stats, etc.)
            every time I log in, and then forget them again as soon as I log
            out. That works pretty well for me.

            Wendy Beck

            wendy@...
            blog.webeck.net
          • Dan Lyke
            ... mod_perl and PostgreSQL. Templates started out as XML, I wrote a Perl module that parses and prettifys HTML into the same tree that the
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 8, 2001
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              Phillip Harrington writes:
              > Who else out there besides me is using their home grown system for
              > blogging? What tools/concepts are you using? Do you deal with
              > templates? Databases? HTML done by hand? What? Are you
              > categorizing? Archiving? Do you run an RSS feed?

              mod_perl and PostgreSQL. Templates started out as XML, I wrote a Perl
              module that parses and prettifys HTML into the same tree that the
              XML::Parser(Style=>Tree) returns, so now they're in HTML except that
              my templating functions are all additional tags of the:

              <query>
              <header>...$variables</header>
              <row>$variables in $row</row>
              <footer>...</footer>
              <otherwise>stuff if the query fails</otherwise>
              </query>

              sort, so that I can look at a template in an HTML browser, those tags
              get stripped, and I see what the page would look like with one row in
              it.

              Content can either be in HTML or a mixed HTML/text markup that has
              evolved from a system originally written to be a reasonable cross
              between human readable text email, and formattable. The text formatter
              looks for various patterns in the input text and converts to HTML
              fairly reliably, it identifies lists, indentations, source code and
              the like, and outputs them reasonably.

              I track users. Categorization is done by, when a new post is made,
              running the post through a massive keyword list, then providing the
              user with the option to edit the resulting categories. One of the
              things on the to-do list is integrating an exclude keyword list, and
              additional include keywords, into this post editing process so that
              users can say "Add this category, and here's why."

              Users have various permission sets, mostly they fall into two classes:
              Able to post new entries to the 'blog, and just able to participate in
              discussions. Other features (photos, etc) are there, but still klunky.

              Archiving has been done since day one, back when I was running flat
              files, but now that I've got conversation on a per entry basis it's a
              necessity. Weblog posts are completely editable with no audit trail
              ("the Pope is infallible and has always been infallible"), user posts
              are completely editable, but when they're edited they get a little
              "[edit history]" tag, which shows the post in all stages of edits.

              So far the only thing that's done is increase the likelyhood that
              people will leave typos in their text, so I'm looking for better
              solutions while still leaving that intact.

              Output is pretty darned close to XHTML, although there are a few
              things that I need to double-check before I can make that claim (I
              know I'm allowing the <font> tag to be <font />, which is
              *wrong*). I'm also still running a "loose" DTD because I want a few
              formatting tricks to make the page look good to me, and I run with
              style sheets turned off to make everyone else's pages readable.

              To that end, I have a cookie based system for page formatting
              selection, default browser colors (the options that bring me the most
              flames about web design; imagine!), light on dark and dark on light. I
              haven't tried to collect statistics about these, I use the light on
              dark format 'cause I still remember the old green phosphors fondly.

              Syndication wise, I run three HTML versions of my main page, the one
              you normally see, a short one with little or no formatting for Palm
              and similar browsers, and a long one with all the comments expanded
              in-line. I also run two XML files, my RSS feed, and a feed of my
              discussion information, which I keep trying to pimp out to share
              discussions with other systems running discussion forums.

              Dan
            • Bill Stilwell
              ... My home grown system is an unholy mixture of mysql, perl, and php. Originally, everything was generated on the fly straight from the database, which was
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 8, 2001
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                Phillip Harrington <phil@...> writes:

                > Who else out there besides me is using their home grown system for
                > blogging? What tools/concepts are you using? Do you deal with templates?
                > Databases? HTML done by hand? What? Are you categorizing? Archiving? Do you
                > run an RSS feed?

                My home grown system is an unholy mixture of mysql, perl, and
                php. Originally, everything was generated on the fly straight from the
                database, which was easy but a stupid waste of resources. Now, I have
                generation scripts that create monthly archives and the front page,
                which is way more sensible. This combined with everything in a
                database makes it fairly easy to change everything site-wide if whim
                dictates.

                No templates, although in the mythical rewrite-from-scratch I suspect
                every home-grown system author is planning I'd use templates.

                No RSS feed, through a combination of laziness and not really being
                sure that it would be useful to anybody, ever.
                --
                Bill Stilwell
                bill@...
                It's all margins.
                Oh, just read my weblog: http://www.marginalia.org
              • Phillip Harrington
                ... I need to bring my Perl up a couple of notches, but at some point I would like to attempt this kind of static page generation thing. My host (he.net) does
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 8, 2001
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                  >Now, I have
                  >generation scripts that create monthly archives and the front page,
                  >which is way more sensible. This combined with everything in a
                  >database makes it fairly easy to change everything site-wide if whim
                  >dictates.

                  I need to bring my Perl up a couple of notches, but at some point I would
                  like to attempt this kind of static page generation thing. My host (he.net)
                  does not have the CGI version of PHP installed, so I have to brush up on
                  the Perl. Right now everything is PHP run on the fly. I would prefer to
                  spit out static pages, but have the option to recreate them all when needed
                  (or also optionally not recreate them, so that archives have the look and
                  feel of the time they were created). I saw an interesting thing in the
                  Apache mod_rewrite documentation about a rewrite rule that would serve a
                  static .html version of a page, unless it was non-existant, in which case
                  it would run the corresponding script to generate said static page, then
                  serve it. Refreshing one's page would just require a cron job to go and
                  delete their .html files. Whoa!

                  >No RSS feed, through a combination of laziness and not really being
                  >sure that it would be useful to anybody, ever.

                  Yeah I did mine for experience, but I also doubt it's useful to anyone.

                  Phil
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