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Re: [webanalytics] Re: My client's domain is its own biggest referrer

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  • Wandering Dave Rhee
    Hi, Rich, Two answers for you here -- 1) it depends on your subdomains, and to what degree you consider them to have separate audiences. For example, one
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Hi, Rich,

      Two answers for you here -- 1) it depends on your subdomains, and to what
      degree you consider them to have separate audiences. For example, one
      retailer may have patio furniture on one site, and shop tools on another.
      While there's obviously an overlap for homeowners, they may have mostly
      separate audiences and traffic patterns, and so you would want both separate
      reporting as well as "roll up" reports.

      2) Consider what new decisions you could make (or what uncertainty you could
      reduce in your existing decisions) if you had data across all subdomains, as
      well as separately by subdomain. If you can't make some additional,
      value-adding decision, then it isn't worth the incremental cost of resources
      to "buy" that extra data collection and analysis. (Don't forget that,
      according to other folks on this forum far wiser than I, you should split
      every $10 of your budget into $1 for data collection, and $9 for data
      analysis.)

      WDave

      P.S. I've found a lot of value in alll the responses in this thread --
      thanks for raising the original question!

      On 10/31/06, richgrog <richgrog@...> wrote:

      Regarding the question of how filtering out these calls from your own
      subdomains may impact reporting of tracking levels, wouldn't we want to
      exclude these visits because they wouldn't be true visits? What I mean is,
      is movement between subdomains actually a new visit or simply someone moving
      around the site within the same session. Aren't we already over reporting
      visit levels by not excluding this data?


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tim.wilson@ni.com
      Putting 1) another way... If the different subdomains are just an unintentional consequence of the way your content delivery systems are set up, then you are
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 2, 2006
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        Putting 1) another way...

        If the different subdomains are just an unintentional consequence of the
        way your content delivery systems are set up, then you are probably
        considering all traffic to the overall domain in your analysis. If you
        were counting "total visits to the site" by looking at a "Visits by
        subdomain" report and summing up the visits to each subdomain...then you
        would be overcounting visits. But why would you do that? Rather, you would
        look at a report that is geared to show total visits to the entire site,
        which would (should) still only count as one visit, even if during that
        user session the user visited multiple subdomains.

        Wow. I thought that was a going to be a simple clarification. ;-)

        Tim





        "Wandering Dave Rhee" <wdaveonline@...>
        Sent by: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
        10/31/2006 04:05 PM
        Please respond to
        webanalytics@yahoogroups.com


        To
        webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
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        Subject
        Re: [webanalytics] Re: My client's domain is its own biggest referrer






        Hi, Rich,

        Two answers for you here -- 1) it depends on your subdomains, and to what
        degree you consider them to have separate audiences. For example, one
        retailer may have patio furniture on one site, and shop tools on another.
        While there's obviously an overlap for homeowners, they may have mostly
        separate audiences and traffic patterns, and so you would want both
        separate
        reporting as well as "roll up" reports.

        2) Consider what new decisions you could make (or what uncertainty you
        could
        reduce in your existing decisions) if you had data across all subdomains,
        as
        well as separately by subdomain. If you can't make some additional,
        value-adding decision, then it isn't worth the incremental cost of
        resources
        to "buy" that extra data collection and analysis. (Don't forget that,
        according to other folks on this forum far wiser than I, you should split
        every $10 of your budget into $1 for data collection, and $9 for data
        analysis.)

        WDave

        P.S. I've found a lot of value in alll the responses in this thread --
        thanks for raising the original question!

        On 10/31/06, richgrog <richgrog@...> wrote:

        Regarding the question of how filtering out these calls from your own
        subdomains may impact reporting of tracking levels, wouldn't we want to
        exclude these visits because they wouldn't be true visits? What I mean is,
        is movement between subdomains actually a new visit or simply someone
        moving
        around the site within the same session. Aren't we already over reporting
        visit levels by not excluding this data?

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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