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#1 eMetrics Takeaway

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  • Jim Novo
    For me anyway... Ford Motor Company has run a pilot where they are using the info from a Build Your Car configurator on the web to predict demand for certain
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 21, 2006
      For me anyway...

      Ford Motor Company has run a pilot where they are using the info from a
      "Build Your Car" configurator on the web to predict demand for certain cars
      and features. When they matched the "predicted" data from the config to
      "actual" sales data, the fit was simply amazing. So amazing you would
      immediately question if the data was "tortured" somehow.

      But that's the nature of near frictionless environments like the web. You
      tend to get behavioral data that is simply more "true" then asking people
      their opinions, which is the more common way to get affirmation for auto
      design from the customer.

      What is probably more important, from an analytical culture perspective, is
      that this gigantic metal-bender with very long lead times is actually using
      this web data to modify production plans because it has been such a
      reliable predictor of demand.

      This concept was so far outside the expected norm that in the Q & A, I made
      a fool of myself by asking Stacey Coopes (from Ford) if I had heard her
      correctly. The conversation went roughly like this:

      Jim: Are you saying that Ford is actually using web demand data to drive
      auto production?

      "Yes", she said.

      Jim: "You mean, to actually schedule production, order parts, configure
      factories?"

      "Yes", she said

      Bottom Line - I simply do not want to hear anyone ever again whining about
      problems with getting management to pay attention to web data. If Stacey
      can make this kind of thing happen at Ford, you can do it where you are.

      This is a monumental achievement.

      Jim
    • Lars
      I don t mind fighting windmills. Cheers, Don Quijote de Suecia (pardon my Spanish)
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 22, 2006
        I don't mind fighting windmills.

        Cheers,
        Don Quijote de Suecia
        (pardon my Spanish)


        Jim Novo wrote:
        >
        > Bottom Line - I simply do not want to hear anyone ever again whining about
        > problems with getting management to pay attention to web data. If Stacey
        > can make this kind of thing happen at Ford, you can do it where you are.
        >
        > This is a monumental achievement.
        >
        > Jim
        >
        >
        >
      • garethhebbron
        Jim, Motor OEM s in Europe, including Ford, have been doing this (Using web `Car Configuration data for SCM) for years, breaking out interest by vehicle
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 23, 2006
          Jim,

          Motor OEM's in Europe, including Ford, have been doing this (Using web
          `Car Configuration' data for SCM) for years, breaking out interest by
          vehicle model, type, engine, colour, and other options.

          I know because we (Sophus3) supply the majority of auto OEM's with the
          metrics for this. They also use overall visitor activity to model site
          sections, brochure requests and test drive requests from the web to
          predict future product interest.

          We have seen direct coloration between all these measurements and
          product order levels, the time lag between peaks and troughs of this
          coloration depending on the cost of the product (the higher the cost
          the greater the lag), and marketing intensity (the greater the
          intensity at the time the shorter the lag).

          We also provide them with benchmarking on web activity for their
          competitors comparable models. This gives them a good idea of what
          kinds of vehicles people are looking for even if their models are not
          receiving interest, so they must be doing something wrong (or right if
          the opposite is the case).

          So yes, web metrics is an excellent indicator for making SCM decisions
          especially if web tools like the car configurator are present, but
          it's important to take into account factors such as marketing influences.

          Gareth.


          --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Novo" <jim@...> wrote:
          >
          > For me anyway...
          >
          > Ford Motor Company has run a pilot where they are using the info from a
          > "Build Your Car" configurator on the web to predict demand for
          certain cars
          > and features. When they matched the "predicted" data from the config to
          > "actual" sales data, the fit was simply amazing. So amazing you would
          > immediately question if the data was "tortured" somehow.
          >
          > But that's the nature of near frictionless environments like the
          web. You
          > tend to get behavioral data that is simply more "true" then asking
          people
          > their opinions, which is the more common way to get affirmation for auto
          > design from the customer.
          >
          > What is probably more important, from an analytical culture
          perspective, is
          > that this gigantic metal-bender with very long lead times is
          actually using
          > this web data to modify production plans because it has been such a
          > reliable predictor of demand.
          >
          > This concept was so far outside the expected norm that in the Q & A,
          I made
          > a fool of myself by asking Stacey Coopes (from Ford) if I had heard her
          > correctly. The conversation went roughly like this:
          >
          > Jim: Are you saying that Ford is actually using web demand data to
          drive
          > auto production?
          >
          > "Yes", she said.
          >
          > Jim: "You mean, to actually schedule production, order parts, configure
          > factories?"
          >
          > "Yes", she said
          >
          > Bottom Line - I simply do not want to hear anyone ever again whining
          about
          > problems with getting management to pay attention to web data. If
          Stacey
          > can make this kind of thing happen at Ford, you can do it where you are.
          >
          > This is a monumental achievement.
          >
          > Jim
          >
        • michaelnotte
          Jim, Excellent post!!!! This is gold! This is what I d like to achieve too for the manufacturer I worked for. We implemented detailed tagging of our brand new
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 24, 2006
            Jim,

            Excellent post!!!! This is gold!

            This is what I'd like to achieve too for the manufacturer I worked
            for. We implemented detailed tagging of our brand new Car
            Configurator application. But the collected data are not yet used
            properly.

            After all it's pretty new here and it takes time to mature. But I
            hope your post will help.

            Cheers,

            Michael

            --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Novo" <jim@...> wrote:
            >
            > For me anyway...
            >
            > Ford Motor Company has run a pilot where they are using the info
            from a
            > "Build Your Car" configurator on the web to predict demand for
            certain cars
            > and features. When they matched the "predicted" data from the
            config to
            > "actual" sales data, the fit was simply amazing. So amazing you
            would
            > immediately question if the data was "tortured" somehow.
            >
            > But that's the nature of near frictionless environments like the
            web. You
            > tend to get behavioral data that is simply more "true" then asking
            people
            > their opinions, which is the more common way to get affirmation for
            auto
            > design from the customer.
            >
            > What is probably more important, from an analytical culture
            perspective, is
            > that this gigantic metal-bender with very long lead times is
            actually using
            > this web data to modify production plans because it has been such a
            > reliable predictor of demand.
            >
            > This concept was so far outside the expected norm that in the Q &
            A, I made
            > a fool of myself by asking Stacey Coopes (from Ford) if I had heard
            her
            > correctly. The conversation went roughly like this:
            >
            > Jim: Are you saying that Ford is actually using web demand data to
            drive
            > auto production?
            >
            > "Yes", she said.
            >
            > Jim: "You mean, to actually schedule production, order parts,
            configure
            > factories?"
            >
            > "Yes", she said
            >
            > Bottom Line - I simply do not want to hear anyone ever again
            whining about
            > problems with getting management to pay attention to web data. If
            Stacey
            > can make this kind of thing happen at Ford, you can do it where you
            are.
            >
            > This is a monumental achievement.
            >
            > Jim
            >
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