Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Webanalytics Group on Frappr

Expand Messages
  • Steven Kraal
    Hi colleagues!   I just started a Frappr map so we can easily find each other around the world! Follow this link to join the Webanalytics Map:
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi colleagues!
       
      I just started a Frappr map so we can easily find each other around the
      world! Follow this link to join the Webanalytics Map:
      http://www.frappr.com/webanalytics
       
      Hope to see you all there!
       
      Kind regards,
       
      Steven Kraal
      E-business Consultant at Moniforce
       
       
      On 01 Dec, 2005 10:31, webanalytics@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
      > There are 5 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Re: Logs vs. Tags
      > From: ernest.mueller@...
      > 2. Simply Hired is hiring - Web Analytics Engineer
      > From: "Kay Luo" <kay@...>
      > 3. Tools
      > From: Ian Lurie <ian@...>
      > 4. Re: Logs vs. Tags
      > From: "Fred Kuu" <fkuu325@...>
      > 5. Re: Logs vs. Tags
      > From: "bluepenguin1980" <ola_zaranska@...>
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 15:34:56 -0600
      > From: ernest.mueller@...
      > Subject: Re: Logs vs. Tags
      >
      > Here's my cookbook of reconciling page tags with server logs.
      >
      > 1. Maybe you don't have all your pages tagged. Possible. Try picking a
      > given representative page you know is tagged and looking at just it -
      > get
      > the log lines for the same timespan for just that page from the server
      > and
      > page tag logs for a clean compare.
      > 2. Make sure you have a <NOSCRIPT> option set up to get hits and some
      > info
      > off people that have JavaScript turned off (most moble clients, for
      > example). Include those lines in your analysis.
      > 3. Put the page tag inline in the top of the <BODY> section of the
      > HTML.
      > 4. Look at the user-agents in the server log and clean out all the
      > known
      > spiders and whatnot.
      > 5. Do a side by side compare in Excel or the like, identify matching
      > lines, lines in the page tag log not in the server log and server log
      > lines
      > not in the page tag log. You'll see some hits in your page tag log not
      > in
      > your server logs; these will mostly be "revisits" to the same page.
      >
      > I've done this and still have a 30-50% drop rate in the page tag logs
      > (page
      > views for the one page with legit looking user agents that do appear
      > in
      > server logs but not page tag logs). It's not just page views but whole
      > visits that get dropped in our case, sounds similar to yours.
      >
      > We've put the same page tag code on another unrelated Web site and see
      > the
      > same results. We've ruled out client issues (turning off JavaScript is
      > possible in many browsers, but the NOSCRIPT catches those; blocking
      > cookies
      > won't affect this analysis, and blocking third party images is only
      > supported in Firefox).
      >
      > I'm frankly wondering if there's an unknown endemic problem with page
      > tagging that no one's figured out yet - not the theoretical "good"
      > reasons
      > you'd see different numbers, but a "bad" reason good hits don't come
      > through.
      >
      > Ernest
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Jennifer Cronan
      > <jencronan@sbcglo
      > bal.net> To
      > Sent by: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
      > webanalytics@yaho cc
      > ogroups.com
      > Subject
      > Re: [webanalytics] Logs vs. Tags
      > 11/30/2005 02:06
      > PM
      >
      >
      > Please respond to
      > webanalytics@yaho
      > ogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I am very interested in this as well. We just switched from log files
      > to
      > tags and we are seeing 4 fold drop in Visits. We have been
      > investigating
      > definitions because we think that log file was tracking Visits as
      > unique
      > sessions to a page instead of unique sessions to the website as a
      > whole.
      > But could there be something else that is causing this huge drop? I
      > knew
      > it would drop a lot because of more clean data, but not that much.
      > -Jen
      >
      > bluepenguin1980 <ola_zaranska@...> wrote:
      > Morning everyone,
      >
      > I've been tasked in predicting how our reporting numbers are going to
      > change once we make a switch from a log-based web analytics solution
      > to
      > tags... The client is looking for some examples (actual numbers and
      > percentages!) - and while I realize (and communicated) that this might
      > be a stretch - has anybody else done similar research?
      >
      > Obviously the numbers will not be the same, and in the end tags will
      > provide a much more accurate state of things - but saying this is not
      > enough.
      >
      > Any input very appreciated,
      >
      > Aleksandra Zaranska
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------------
      > Web Metrics Discussion Group
      > Moderated by Eric T. Peterson
      > Author, Web Analytics Demystified
      > http://www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
      >
      >
      >
      > SPONSORED LINKS
      >
      > Internet business Start internet Internet business
      > plan business
      >
      > Internet business Internet home Internet business
      > online business consulting
      >
      >
      >
      > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
      >
      > Visit your group "webanalytics" on the web.
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > webanalytics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 13:39:30 -0800
      > From: "Kay Luo" <kay@...>
      > Subject: Simply Hired is hiring - Web Analytics Engineer
      >
      > Hi Folks,
      >
      >
      >
      > We're looking for a Web Analytics Engineer. The job description is
      > below, please forward it to anyone who may be interested.
      >
      >
      >
      > Also, for those of you who may be looking for a new job (or know
      > someone
      > who is), Simply Hired is a search engine for jobs. We aggregate jobs
      > from thousands of sites including Monster, Career Builder, HotJobs,
      > craigslist, company websites and niche job boards. Check out our site:
      > www.SimplyHired.com <http://www.simplyhired.com/> .
      >
      >
      >
      > If you're not looking for a job but could use a laugh, check out our
      > "sister" site: www.SimplyFired.com <http://www.simplyfired.com/> . We
      > have some pretty funny videos about getting fired.
      >
      >
      >
      > We're a fun company, join us! Send your resume my way and I'll make
      > sure it gets to the right person.
      >
      >
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      >
      >
      > -Kay
      >
      >
      >
      > ~~~~~~~~
      >
      > Kay Luo
      >
      > Online Marketing Manager, Simply Hired
      >
      > kay@... / www.SimplyHired.com
      >
      > 650.254.9000 ext. 119 / 650.868.5586 cell
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > www.simplyhired.com/careers.html
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Web Analytics Engineer Location: Mountain View, California Job Code:
      > ENG03WEBM
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      > Description Simply Hired (www.SimplyHired.com) is a young, dynamic
      > start-up company that operates the world's largest search engine for
      > jobs. We aggregate and index over 4,000,000 jobs from a wide variety
      > of
      > sources including job boards, newspapers, classified listings and
      > company websites. Our mission is to help people find their next job in
      > the simplest, most effective way possible.
      >
      > Simply Hired has raised over $4M in funding to date, and is a
      > privately
      > held company headquartered in Mountain View, California. The company
      > was
      > selected by Time magazine as one of the "50 Coolest Websites 2005",
      > and
      > has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The
      > Washington Post, ABC, CNN and numerous other publications. The company
      > also operates the popular site Simply Fired (www.SimplyFired.com
      > <http://www.simplyfired.com/> ).
      >
      >
      > Responsibilities:
      >
      > * Define strategy for collection and distribution of key business
      > metrics (number of users, first-time vs. repeat, use of advanced
      > features, sources of traffic, number and types of jobs featured, etc.)
      > working with stakeholders from executive, marketing, business
      > development, and engineering teams
      > * Evaluate third-party tools & services that provide business
      > intelligence views on web usage data
      > * Implement strategy for collection, storage, analysis, and
      > distribution
      > of these metrics
      > * Build tools for the automation of standard metrics and interactive
      > interpretation of ad hoc questions
      > * Interpret website usage data (from both web logs and back-end
      > databases) to identify improvements in product features, marketing
      > messaging and system usability
      >
      >
      > Skills Required:
      > * 2-3 years of experience with web analytics tools such as Omniture,
      > Coremetrics, Urchin, Sawmill, SurfAid, ClickTracks, SiteClarity or the
      > like
      > * 2-3 years of experience with perl or python
      > * 1-2 years of experience with SQL, able to write efficient, complex
      > queries
      > * Strong understanding of statistics, expert user of Excel
      > * 1-2 years of experience administering web servers
      > * Conversant with standard Internet protocols, infrastructure, and
      > technologies (eg. HTTP, HTML, CSS, XML, Javascript, etc.).
      > * Comfortable interacting with marketing and business executives: Able
      > to translate business requirements into technical requirements and
      > running systems
      > * Strong written and oral communication skills
      > * Bachelor's degree in technical field
      >
      > Desired Skills:
      > * Database administration experience
      > * 2+ years of experience developing web based applications in a
      > Linux/Unix environment.
      > * Experience with statistical tools like SAS
      > * Experience with open-source tools and projects
      >
      >
      >
      > [This message contained attachments]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 13:53:18 -0800
      > From: Ian Lurie <ian@...>
      > Subject: Tools
      >
      > Hi all,
      >
      > I hope this isn't a totally stupid question, but I thought it might
      > help all
      > of us if we could get a show of hands on the tools we use to do our
      > jobs.
      >
      > What do folks use for their various tasks - stuff like clickstream
      > analysis,
      > recency/latency, plain old visitors and the like?
      >
      > We're using Urchin 5 with the Campaign Tracking and E-Commerce
      > Modules, plus
      > Excel, SQL Server and some home-grown stuff. But somehow I think I can
      > make
      > my life easier than that...
      >
      > Any takers?
      >
      > Ian
      >
      > President | 206.575.3740
      > Portent Interactive
      > An Internet Marketing Agency
      > http://www.portentinteractive.com
      > http://www.conversationmarketing.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 4
      > Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 21:58:17 -0000
      > From: "Fred Kuu" <fkuu325@...>
      > Subject: Re: Logs vs. Tags
      >
      > One of the things to think about is that with logging, the web server
      > can immediately write requests to a file. However, in a page tagging
      > scenario, you're relying on the client browser to pass information to
      > another server over the Internet. There is a likelihood that a small
      > percentage of requests get dropped somewhere in between. In addition,
      > network bandwidth and server capabilities of the ASPs play a vital
      > role in how many concurrent requests (site traffic) they can log.
      > Granted, I doubt this accounts for a large percentage and there are
      > other factors at play here.
      >
      > -Fred
      >
      > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, ernest.mueller@n... wrote:
      > >
      > > Here's my cookbook of reconciling page tags with server logs.
      > >
      > > 1. Maybe you don't have all your pages tagged. Possible. Try
      > picking a
      > > given representative page you know is tagged and looking at just it
      > - get
      > > the log lines for the same timespan for just that page from the
      > server and
      > > page tag logs for a clean compare.
      > > 2. Make sure you have a <NOSCRIPT> option set up to get hits and
      > some info
      > > off people that have JavaScript turned off (most moble clients, for
      > > example). Include those lines in your analysis.
      > > 3. Put the page tag inline in the top of the <BODY> section of the
      > HTML.
      > > 4. Look at the user-agents in the server log and clean out all the
      > known
      > > spiders and whatnot.
      > > 5. Do a side by side compare in Excel or the like, identify matching
      > > lines, lines in the page tag log not in the server log and server
      > log lines
      > > not in the page tag log. You'll see some hits in your page tag log
      > not in
      > > your server logs; these will mostly be "revisits" to the same page.
      > >
      > > I've done this and still have a 30-50% drop rate in the page tag
      > logs (page
      > > views for the one page with legit looking user agents that do appear
      > > in
      > > server logs but not page tag logs). It's not just page views but
      > > whole
      > > visits that get dropped in our case, sounds similar to yours.
      > >
      > > We've put the same page tag code on another unrelated Web site and
      > see the
      > > same results. We've ruled out client issues (turning off JavaScript
      > > is
      > > possible in many browsers, but the NOSCRIPT catches those; blocking
      > cookies
      > > won't affect this analysis, and blocking third party images is only
      > > supported in Firefox).
      > >
      > > I'm frankly wondering if there's an unknown endemic problem with
      > > page
      > > tagging that no one's figured out yet - not the theoretical "good"
      > reasons
      > > you'd see different numbers, but a "bad" reason good hits don't come
      > > through.
      > >
      > > Ernest
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 5
      > Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2005 01:58:28 -0000
      > From: "bluepenguin1980" <ola_zaranska@...>
      > Subject: Re: Logs vs. Tags
      >
      > I have to say all the talk about 4-fold visit drops make me very
      > nervous. I was hoping that our visits would not see a dramatic
      > decline - mainly because we're quite meticulous about blocking any
      > unwanted traffic (mostly the spiders). The client already
      > experienced a slight shock ealier this year when the spider filters
      > were implemented - and visits dropped by 30%..
      >
      > Could it be possible that in other stories posted here - there might
      > have also been some filtering issues, or anything else not directly
      > related to the tagging vs. logging (So software settings?). One of
      > the posts mentioned total unique visitors being counted as per page,
      > not the entire site.
      >
      > One of the thing I'm absolutely prepared for is our page views
      > dropping - right now our Webtrends interprets flash files as pages,
      > hence all the flash loads (eg. 5 flash files in a page) get recorded
      > as individual page views...
      >
      > I'll definitely keep you updated as to what happens.
      >
      >
      > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Kuu" <fkuu325@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > One of the things to think about is that with logging, the web
      > server
      > > can immediately write requests to a file. However, in a page
      > tagging
      > > scenario, you're relying on the client browser to pass information
      > to
      > > another server over the Internet. There is a likelihood that a
      > small
      > > percentage of requests get dropped somewhere in between. In
      > addition,
      > > network bandwidth and server capabilities of the ASPs play a vital
      > > role in how many concurrent requests (site traffic) they can log.
      > > Granted, I doubt this accounts for a large percentage and there are
      > > other factors at play here.
      > >
      > > -Fred
      > >
      > > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, ernest.mueller@n... wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Here's my cookbook of reconciling page tags with server logs.
      > > >
      > > > 1. Maybe you don't have all your pages tagged. Possible. Try
      > > picking a
      > > > given representative page you know is tagged and looking at
      > just it
      > > - get
      > > > the log lines for the same timespan for just that page from the
      > > server and
      > > > page tag logs for a clean compare.
      > > > 2. Make sure you have a <NOSCRIPT> option set up to get hits and
      > > some info
      > > > off people that have JavaScript turned off (most moble clients,
      > for
      > > > example). Include those lines in your analysis.
      > > > 3. Put the page tag inline in the top of the <BODY> section of
      > the
      > > HTML.
      > > > 4. Look at the user-agents in the server log and clean out all
      > the
      > > known
      > > > spiders and whatnot.
      > > > 5. Do a side by side compare in Excel or the like, identify
      > matching
      > > > lines, lines in the page tag log not in the server log and server
      > > log lines
      > > > not in the page tag log. You'll see some hits in your page tag
      > log
      > > not in
      > > > your server logs; these will mostly be "revisits" to the same
      > page.
      > > >
      > > > I've done this and still have a 30-50% drop rate in the page tag
      > > logs (page
      > > > views for the one page with legit looking user agents that do
      > appear in
      > > > server logs but not page tag logs). It's not just page views
      > but whole
      > > > visits that get dropped in our case, sounds similar to yours.
      > > >
      > > > We've put the same page tag code on another unrelated Web site
      > and
      > > see the
      > > > same results. We've ruled out client issues (turning off
      > JavaScript is
      > > > possible in many browsers, but the NOSCRIPT catches those;
      > blocking
      > > cookies
      > > > won't affect this analysis, and blocking third party images is
      > only
      > > > supported in Firefox).
      > > >
      > > > I'm frankly wondering if there's an unknown endemic problem with
      > page
      > > > tagging that no one's figured out yet - not the
      > theoretical "good"
      > > reasons
      > > > you'd see different numbers, but a "bad" reason good hits don't
      > come
      > > > through.
      > > >
      > > > Ernest
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------------
      > Web Metrics Discussion Group
      > Moderated by Eric T. Peterson
      > Author, Web Analytics Demystified
      > http://www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.