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Re: The Rise & Decline of this Group

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  • david darcangelo
    I would add that this group is still an added value for people working everyday with analytics tools. Always keeping the buzz on tweeks and new features for
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 23, 2013
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      I would add that this group is still an added value for people working
      everyday with analytics tools. Always keeping the buzz on tweeks and new
      features for web analytics.
      What I see is the online interaction is getting different for everybody and
      for sure the tweeter short msgs or the easy to comment FB way are taking
      over.
      Could be that thinking a different way to interact with the group, as a
      medium, could make it get back to the golden age.
      Still it is the place where to get the most extensive opinions from
      different people. Nowhere else you can get it in the same way.

      Cheers


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Greg Moore
      Trends smends. I predict that posting activity will increase over the next year. : ) Sincerely, The Amazing Carnac Gregory Moore San Francisco ... [Non-text
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 23, 2013
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        Trends smends.

        I predict that posting activity will increase over the next year. : )

        Sincerely,
        The Amazing Carnac

        Gregory Moore
        San Francisco



        On Tue, Jul 23, 2013 at 7:00 AM, cjam_roxxx <cjam_roxxx@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Perhaps a way to help revive interest in following this group would be to
        > let people know you can follow it as an RSS feed (which is what I've been
        > doing - I haven't received the group emails in a long time but I always see
        > the postings since it's in my feedly).
        >
        > Just a thought - I, too, still find this group to be of value.
        >
        > CJ @measurefuture
        >
        >
        > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Tim Leighton-Boyce <tim.lboyce@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > I think this group still provides a valuable forum in which matters which
        > > are not specific to one particular vendor are sometimes discussed,
        > although
        > > not very often.
        > >
        > > I also continue to read it (though I seldom contribute -- sorry) because
        > it
        > > provides insight into some of the subjects which are occupying the minds
        > of
        > > people who are using different tools from the ones I favour. Many of the
        > > more recent groups have a narrower focus, while things like #measure have
        > > become useless in real life.
        > >
        > > The volume of activity in the group is not necessarily an indication of
        > > value. The signal to noise ratio is much better here than in many other
        > > groups.
        > >
        > > Tim
        > >
        > > On 23 July 2013 05:35, Stephane Hamel <shamel67@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > **
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Wow @WDave, probably the longest post in this group ever!
        > > >
        > > > The decline of activity in this group seems to be somewhat similar to
        > the
        > > > spike and decline of interest in Twitter. There are also lots of
        > LinkedIn
        > > > groups that popped up and are pretty much inactive.
        > > >
        > > > Is it really a decline? This Google Trends also seems to indicate a
        > > > gradual decline:
        > > >
        > http://www.google.com/trends/explore?q=%22web+analytics%22#q=%22web%20analytics%22&cmpt=q
        > > >
        > > > However, there is specialization of the "web analyst" role - a gradual
        > > > breakdown of the old "webmaster" into dozens of new jobs. Same thing is
        > > > going on in our field.
        > > >
        > > > There are many alternatives to this Yahoo! group: Quora (where there
        > are
        > > > some good Q&A), LinkedIn (with dozens of groups on many related
        > topics),
        > > > G+, twitter (where, sadly, #measure has been mostly overtaken by
        > spammers),
        > > > Facebook (which never really picked up as a platform for our
        > community)...
        > > >
        > > > There are new, vibrant communities like the GA G+ Community (see
        > > > http://goo.gl/iAJ8g ) now boasting over 16k members where a couple of
        > > > moderators (yours truly included) are applying strict rules regarding
        > spam,
        > > > self promotion, blatant marketing pitch and such. The level of
        > > > conversation, respect, quality and support is just awesome - and maybe
        > the
        > > > platform itself makes a difference. Yahoo groups are the same good old
        > > > Yahoo groups... G+ is picking up and becoming so ubiquitous.
        > > >
        > > > Is there a decline of interest for web/online/digital analytics? I
        > don't
        > > > think so - just take a look at the Google Analytics official page on G+
        > > > (see https://plus.google.com/+GoogleAnalytics/ ) - there are over 1.2M
        > > > people interested enough to follow what the vendor has to say!
        > > >
        > > > Is there a decline of interest in this group or this platform? Maybe?
        > > >
        > > > I think the group and the long time moderator have helped thousand of
        > > > people finding their place in the field. There has been great debates,
        > lots
        > > > of Q&A, tips, advice and guidance and for that we can all be immensely
        > > > thankful.
        > > >
        > > > St�phane Hamel - @SHamelCP
        > > > Director, Strategic Services
        > > > CardinalPath.com
        > > >
        > > > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Wandering Dave Rhee <wdaveonline@
        > >
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Hi, All,
        > > > >
        > > > > @Mohit -- interesting chart! However, I (and a number of other
        > hard-core
        > > > > data visualization analysts) would take issue with the fact that you
        > > > used a
        > > > > line graph for non-continuous data. ;-D That is, temperature varies
        > > > > continuously -- it really does "slide" from one value to the next.
        > > > > Posts per month, however, does not "slide" -- in between Jan and Feb,
        > > > there
        > > > > is no month with a number of posts equal to the average of the two
        > > > months,
        > > > > and so a bar graph would be more appropriate than a line graph. ;-)
        > > > >
        > > > > But pedantics aside, and addressing @Matt's question, I believe
        > there are
        > > > > still as many useful replies for every question asked as there were
        > in
        > > > our
        > > > > "glory days."
        > > > >
        > > > > The difference in volume is due to several factors, but the primary
        > one
        > > > is
        > > > > the rise of blogging as a platform. When blogs began to become easy
        > to
        > > > use
        > > > > for non-coders (that is, they did not require a large investment of
        > time
        > > > or
        > > > > money to create or maintain, due to turn-key, free platforms), many
        > of
        > > > our
        > > > > most prominent members realized that they could get better metrics on
        > > > their
        > > > > audience (in an actionable and sometimes monetizable sense) by
        > creating
        > > > > individual publishing platforms. Some of my esteemed colleagues still
        > > > post
        > > > > here regularly, like Jim Sterne and St�phane Hamel, while others have
        > > > found
        > > > > greater success by focusing on their own blogs, often tied to their
        > book
        > > > > publishing or consulting platforms, such as Avinash Kaushik, Eric
        > > > Peterson,
        > > > > and many, many others too numerous to name, particularly since I'm
        > > > already
        > > > > doing too much name-dropping as it is. ;-)
        > > > >
        > > > > Many of these fine folks are quite busy with successful consulting
        > > > careers,
        > > > > and answering queries from their own dedicated following, though
        > some of
        > > > > them also make the time to read and answer posts here on the good
        > ol' Web
        > > > > Analytics Forum, too.
        > > > >
        > > > > To each and every one of the 7233 (as of today) loyal members of this
        > > > > forum, long-time and brand new readers, and long-time and brand new
        > > > > contributors, please know that you have the heartfelt appreciation
        > and
        > > > > thanks from all of us on the moderator team, as well as your 7232
        > fellow
        > > > > members. I may be the most visible of the team, but group founder
        > Eric
        > > > > Peterson, Digital Analytics Association founder Jim Sterne, and
        > analytics
        > > > > heroes Michael Wexler, Dylan Lewis, and Brian Clifton -- we're all
        > > > > immensely proud of the community that's been developed here over the
        > > > years,
        > > > > and we thank you for your role in it.
        > > > >
        > > > > This community is, as many of you with prior histories in other
        > > > industries
        > > > > can happily attest to, one of the few global professional communities
        > > > where
        > > > > standards of honesty, integrity, and transparency are held in the
        > highest
        > > > > regard by each of us, as proud community members, both in a
        > professional
        > > > > and in a personal sense. When we meet each other in person, we are
        > the
        > > > > same people of integrity as we are online, whether on stage at
        > eMetrics,
        > > > in
        > > > > the audience, behind a vendor table, or sharing a drink in the lobby
        > bar.
        > > > > Our business dealings with each other are as above-board and honest
        > as
        > > > > those you would find in any professional services industry --
        > actually,
        > > > > probably much more so. We respect each other as people first, as
        > > > > professionals second, and as digital analysts third -- but
        > regardless,
        > > > the
        > > > > level of appreciation we have for each other is pretty amazingly
        > high.
        > > > >
        > > > > We are tool developers, vendors, engineers, marketers, clients,
        > agency
        > > > > strategists, planners, analysts, and consultants. We are employees
        > and
        > > > > employers, executives and newbies. We work for Fortune 10
        > corporations,
        > > > > and tiny charities. While some of us are extreme specialists, most
        > of us
        > > > > wear several different hats every day, and thrive on the challenge in
        > > > > variety.
        > > > >
        > > > > In our technical conversations, we are careful to note when we have
        > > > > personal or professional biases towards a particular tool, and also
        > note
        > > > > when our assumptions about the suitability of a solution that worked
        > well
        > > > > for us in one situation may not be applicable to others in other
        > > > > situations. This combination of world-class quality advice,
        > > > > professionalism, friendliness, camaraderie, and just overall positive
        > > > > attitude and sense of humor is extremely rare to find in any
        > community,
        > > > > much less one whose members practice our art, craft, and profession
        > in
        > > > > nearly every country in the world, and across many cultural and
        > > > linguistic
        > > > > boundaries.
        > > > >
        > > > > Our common language is not, as you might suspect, metrics, KPIs,
        > > > analytics,
        > > > > performance, optimization, or even persuasion. It is the language of
        > > > > mutual respect. If we suddenly switched over to talking about pets,
        > or
        > > > > travel, we would be saying vastly different things, but our very
        > deep and
        > > > > durable sense of community would, in all probability (insert nerdy
        > > > > statistics joke here!), still remain.
        > > > >
        > > > > You may rest assured, however, that this is no accident! ;-) The
        > > > > moderator team has had extensive experience in managing communities,
        > long
        > > > > before the marketing world had ever heard of "social media," much
        > less
        > > > > tried to attach numbers to it! You may (or may not!) be surprised if
        > you
        > > > > could see some of the behind-the-scenes discussions we occasionally
        > have
        > > > > with each other, and with concerned members.
        > > > >
        > > > > You may even be one of the members whom we've had the pleasure to
        > help
        > > > > personally, such as if you were looking to hire a new analyst, and
        > wanted
        > > > > our advice on which elements made for the most compelling job
        > posting. Or
        > > > > if you were one of the unlucky souls who accidentally replied
        > publicly to
        > > > > such a posting, which we caught before it was released. A very small
        > > > > number of you have had more serious issues, and we are hopeful that
        > you
        > > > > were not only satisfied with our quick and thorough response, but
        > that we
        > > > > were able to help you get more value out of this forum, despite any
        > > > initial
        > > > > misgivings.
        > > > >
        > > > > By design, we have chosen to take a more hands-off approach to the
        > > > > moderation of this forum. That is, none of the other moderators have
        > ever
        > > > > posted a series of thought-provoking "questions of the week" designed
        > > > > simply to stir up controversy or generate increased traffic, nor
        > have we
        > > > > jumped in with an immediate response to every question we could
        > answer
        > > > > (which, seriously, between all of the moderators on the team, would
        > > > > probably be almost all of them). Instead, we have let the traffic
        > grow
        > > > (or
        > > > > decline) organically. Our (unstated) goal was to create a supportive
        > > > > environment in which each member is empowered to help any other
        > member as
        > > > > best as they can, without interference from a "know-it-all" moderator
        > > > team.
        > > > > We will allow you to judge for yourself if we have been successful at
        > > > that
        > > > > -- and as always, we appreciate your constructive feedback in
        > helping us
        > > > > make this forum more valuable for all its members.
        > > > >
        > > > > It is true that, occasionally, I go off on a long rant (like this
        > one),
        > > > but
        > > > > you have all been generally forgiving, so, with your blessing, I will
        > > > > continue to do that once in awhile. ;-)
        > > > >
        > > > > As for generating new content, those of us who remember the early
        > > > eMetrics
        > > > > conferences in Santa Barbara (back when it was still E-Metrics!) have
        > > > > witnessed quite a maturation of the industry. Many of our earlier
        > posts
        > > > > were concerned with exploring the developing set of tools available,
        > and
        > > > > providing their designers and developers (many of whom are still
        > members
        > > > > here today) with constructive feedback. As the individual tools
        > > > themselves
        > > > > matured, and as the competitive environment itself matured to an
        > extent
        > > > > that acquisitions and mergers caused there to be a few larger,
        > > > > general-purpose tools, and a few, smaller niche tools, these topics
        > have
        > > > > naturally become less active.
        > > > >
        > > > > However, there is one major gap which I ("Wandering" Dave) have
        > noticed,
        > > > > that I myself find fascinating, and wish to address personally. This
        > is
        > > > > the topic of advanced career development strategies and tactics. As I
        > > > > write on this topic, I will post material here, as well as in other
        > > > places,
        > > > > and hope to engage each of you in a productive discussion, in which
        > > > sharing
        > > > > your experiences with others will become a key part of our ongoing
        > > > > conversation.
        > > > >
        > > > > In the meantime, on behalf of all the Moderators, thank you again for
        > > > your
        > > > > thoughtful, considerate, and valuable contributions over the last 7
        > > > years,
        > > > > 3 months, and 7 days. We look forward to sustaining our growing
        > community
        > > > > with you over the coming years with as much joy and appreciation as
        > we
        > > > have
        > > > > been delighted to experience in the past, and we welcome your
        > continued
        > > > > participation in our ongoing conversation.
        > > > >
        > > > > WDave, on behalf of Eric, Jim, Michael, Dylan, Brian, and the global
        > > > > Digital Analytics Association
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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