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Re: [webanalytics] Re: Most valuable experience to have in your technical skill set as a web analyst

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  • Julien Coquet
    I know kung fu, erm, Javascript ... more productive contributor to the implementation process. ... improves your ability to assess anomalies and gauge impact
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 3, 2012
      "I know kung fu, erm, Javascript"

      On Nov 3, 2012 10:30 AM, "gamerpatrick" <patrickgamer@...> wrote:
      >
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      > JavaScript is good for many reasons.
      >
      > 1) Helps you understand how things are tracked, and allows you to be a
      more productive contributor to the implementation process.
      > 2) Gives you a better understanding of how websites work, which in turn
      improves your ability to assess anomalies and gauge impact on reports of
      various technical events.
      > 3) Keeps you in the logical frame of mind. Keeps you rooted in thinking
      objectively and provides grounding from getting swept-up in the gut-feeling
      meetings.
      > 4) It's a great stepping stone to more advanced business intelligence
      work with languages like R.
      >
      > - Patrick
      > http://pmazzotta.com
      >
      >
      > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Bob Willis <bntwillis@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > A good understanding of javascript is a solid start. Ability to
      write/understand db queries is also helpful. Also, something I find a lot
      of my customers unable to do, that is very valuable, is knowing how to see
      exactly what values are being sent to your web analytics tool from your
      site's pages. This can be done using a wide variety of tools like httpfox,
      httpwatch, fiddler, WASP, etc. Simply being able to go to a page and seeing
      what values are being passed can help debug a lot of issues.
      > >
      > > --- On Thu, 11/1/12, Greg <gpolkin5@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > From: Greg <gpolkin5@...>
      >
      > > Subject: [webanalytics] Most valuable experience to have in your
      technical skill set as a web analyst
      > > To: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Thursday, November 1, 2012, 12:30 PM
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      > > As a non-tech savvy web analyst, I am curious what technical skills you
      feel are critical and any good resources you might suggest to acquire those
      skills. I am not talking the basics such as use of Omniture, SAS, Excel but
      rather more technical/dev type skills.
      > >
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      > > Tks,Greg
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Samrat Dsouza
      Hi I second Vernon here. I have felt the difference myself after being many web analyst. If you know your way through a log file and sessions, you ve won half
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 3, 2012
        Hi

        I second Vernon here. I have felt the difference myself after being many web analyst. If you know your way through a log file and sessions, you've won half the battle being a good web analyst which most wouldn't even think about.

        More than half the analyst I have met think Omniture or any other tool give cent percent correct data. While I have had instances where it wasn't.

        In fact a great analytics company in India i worked for, Nabler, used to take interview tests with log files.

        Thanks
        Samrat d'souza

        --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Vernon Wyatt <vernon.wyatt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Greg,
        >
        > When I started off as a developer many years ago, everything clicked for me
        > when I would tail the system logs with my session id (access, app,
        > database, etc) and watch them as I navigated through the site. It taught me
        > everything. You see how things work together and you learn how to interpret
        > that data.
        >
        > Fast forward many years and the best thing I tell web analysts to do is
        > create a session on your web site and find the trail of data in your web
        > analytic tools, logs, database, etc. Try and get as close to the raw data
        > as possible.
        >
        > At the end of the day, you need to understand how the web analytic tools
        > interpret the customer experience and if you analyze your own session you
        > know exactly what you did and you will learn how your tools are
        > interpreting what customers do. Then you will have a better appreciation
        > and understanding of where the data aggregations come from and uncover
        > potential issues and opportunities.
        >
        > Regarding a good resource for learning. Well, I have an amazing
        > resource....it doesn't get any better than....Coursera and Udacity...if you
        > haven't been turned on to this yet....you're welcome
        > http://www.class-central.com/
        >
        > Hope that helps.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Vernon
        >
        >
        >
        > On Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 6:30 PM, Greg <gpolkin5@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > As a non-tech savvy web analyst, I am curious what technical skills you
        > > feel are critical and any good resources you might suggest to acquire those
        > > skills. I am not talking the basics such as use of Omniture, SAS, Excel but
        > > rather more technical/dev type skills.
        > >
        > > Tks,Greg
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Greg
        I appreciate you guys sharing your perspectives. Greg
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 5, 2012
          I appreciate you guys sharing your perspectives.

          Greg

          --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Greg" <gpolkin5@...> wrote:
          >
          > As a non-tech savvy web analyst, I am curious what technical skills you feel are critical and any good resources you might suggest to acquire those skills. I am not talking the basics such as use of Omniture, SAS, Excel but rather more technical/dev type skills.
          >
          > Tks,Greg
          >
        • loveandsqualor2001
          If you regard SQL as being sufficiently technical, I highly recommend learning it. The ability to write complex queries and build custom data marts has been a
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 7, 2012
            If you regard SQL as being sufficiently technical, I highly recommend learning it. The ability to write complex queries and build custom data marts has been a big asset in my career.



            --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Greg" <gpolkin5@...> wrote:
            >
            > As a non-tech savvy web analyst, I am curious what technical skills you feel are critical and any good resources you might suggest to acquire those skills. I am not talking the basics such as use of Omniture, SAS, Excel but rather more technical/dev type skills.
            >
            > Tks,Greg
            >
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