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Re: Google analytics question

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  • Shawna Martin
    Am I missing something? I go to Traffic Sources/All Traffic in GA and it breaks out the CPC traffic. In addition, under the Content menu I can break out page
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
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      Am I missing something? I go to Traffic Sources/All Traffic in GA and it
      breaks out the CPC traffic. In addition, under the Content menu I can break
      out page by Medium, i.e. paid or organic.

      I'll admit I am not as advanced as the rest of you in that I don't code or
      manage any e-commerce campaigns. You've (pl.) inspired me to learn basic
      HTML. Next up, scripting.



      Shawna Martin

      LMI ADVERTISING

      Financial Controller

      24E East Roseville Road
      Lancaster, PA 17601
      p 717.569.8826 ext. 21
      f 717.569.9463
      www.lmiadvertising.com

      FOLLOW US:
      <blocked::http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lancaster-PA/LMI-Advertising/6420009
      6769> f <blocked::http://twitter.com/LMIAdvertising> t





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Yuhui
      Hi Rod and Jags, 2 things to clarify about tagging for paid search: 1. Using Google AdWords autotagging doesn t lose keywords I m not sure why Rod mentioned
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
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        Hi Rod and Jags,

        2 things to clarify about tagging for paid search:

        1. Using Google AdWords' autotagging doesn't lose keywords
        I'm not sure why Rod mentioned that you get "(not set)" as the one-and-only keyword if you use AdWords' autotagging. Based on my experience, the keywords that searchers use *do* show up in GA all well and good with autotagging.

        Anyway, it would be really strange if Google, a company that emphasizes searching, which implies an emphasis on keywords, does not expose the paid search keywords in its own Analytics product.

        2. Remember to use "utm_medium=cpc" for non-AdWords tracking
        Google Analytics automatically classifies any traffic source that has "utm_medium=cpc" as paid search. If you use something else, like "utm_medium=ppc" or "utm_medium=paidsearch", you'll need to dig into your "Campaign" reports manually to find those campaigns, instead of just heading over to the "Search Engine" reports.

        This works with *any* search engine. Theoretically, you could also use it with display campaigns or any other tagged traffic source to "spoof" a paid search engine -- though I don't know why anyone would wanna do that!

        Regards,
        Yu Hui
        Twitter: @yuhui

        --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Rod Jacka" <rod@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Jags,
        >
        > The key to this is to tell Google Analytics that the visitors from your paid campaigns are separate to your organic traffic. By default Google Analytics places all visits from its list of recognised search engines into the organic campaign group. One way or another you need to identify a way of allocating the paid search campaigns to the CPC group.
        >
        > Do you have have the WebTrends tagging in place (WT.srch=1) in the links from the ads? This is what will cause WebTrends to treat the visits from your paid campaigns separately from your organic search traffic.
        >
        > For Google Analytics to treat visitors from the paid search campaigns separately you can use the URL campaign tags yoursite.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=adwords OR you can add the auto tagging URL which will append gclid=.... to the end of the URL automatically.
        >
        > The autotagging approach is easiest, however will result in keyword data being shown as (not-set) in the reports.
        >
        > To get the data corrected retrospectively you can use segments and I suggest creating a segment that includes visits from organic search but excludes visits with the GUID in the url.
        >
        > This will allow you to retrospectively report on the correct data assuming of course that all of your paid search campaigns have this GUID in the URL.
        >
        > Happy to take a look at this issue of line and advise in detail if you need further assistance.
        >
        > Kind regards
        >
        > Rod Jacka
        > Principal Web Analytics Consultant
        > Panalysis
        > http://www.panalysis.com/
        > http://blog.panalysis.com/
        >
        > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Jagruti <jags707@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi all,
        > >
        > > My company has two different google analytics account set-up for organic and paid advertising. The paid is handled by an agency and there is absolutely no linkage to it. I run the organic account...We have atlas tags set-up for all the paid campaigns. And when we try to dig into the traffic data that we get from organic in webtrends and Google Analytics, there is a huge discrepancy.
        > >
        > > The Google analytics data is always showing more traffic than webtrends. The reason being when we checked the urls being tracked, it is even counting the paid campaign urls with the GUID atlas tags as organic.
        > >
        > > I need your help in 2 ways
        > > - I do not want GA to include the GUID tagged url into organic visits
        > > - And in the visits report I want it to categorize the visits that came from GUID urls into paid and not into organic search.
        > >
        > > What is the best option here?
        > > 1- Create a filter - what elements and how?
        > > 2- Exclude URL Query Parameters?- what and how?
        > >
        > > Any other suggestions or thoughts??
        > >
        > > Please advice..
        > >
        > > Thank you..
        > >
        > > Jags
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • Rod Jacka
        Hi Yu, Thanks for your comment. My answer was specific to the situation that Jags mentioned which is that there are two Google Analytics accounts and only one
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
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          Hi Yu,

          Thanks for your comment.

          My answer was specific to the situation that Jags mentioned which is that there are two Google Analytics accounts and only one of them is linked to the AdWords account.

          When Auto-tagging is used on a linked account everything works perfectly and you get both the keywords that you are bidding on as well as the keywords that the user entered into Google.

          When the account is not linked the UTMZ cookie which stores the marketing data is set to contain the GCLID value which is a key that Google Analytics later uses to look up the data from the AdWords service. As this look up fails due to the accounts not being linked this results (not set) for the paid search keywords report.

          Rod Jacka
          Principal Web Analytics Consultant
          Panalysis
          http://www.panalysis.com/
          http://blog.panalysis.com/


          --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Yuhui" <yuhuibc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Rod and Jags,
          >
          > 2 things to clarify about tagging for paid search:
          >
          > 1. Using Google AdWords' autotagging doesn't lose keywords
          > I'm not sure why Rod mentioned that you get "(not set)" as the one-and-only keyword if you use AdWords' autotagging. Based on my experience, the keywords that searchers use *do* show up in GA all well and good with autotagging.
          >
          > Anyway, it would be really strange if Google, a company that emphasizes searching, which implies an emphasis on keywords, does not expose the paid search keywords in its own Analytics product.
          >
          > 2. Remember to use "utm_medium=cpc" for non-AdWords tracking
          > Google Analytics automatically classifies any traffic source that has "utm_medium=cpc" as paid search. If you use something else, like "utm_medium=ppc" or "utm_medium=paidsearch", you'll need to dig into your "Campaign" reports manually to find those campaigns, instead of just heading over to the "Search Engine" reports.
          >
          > This works with *any* search engine. Theoretically, you could also use it with display campaigns or any other tagged traffic source to "spoof" a paid search engine -- though I don't know why anyone would wanna do that!
          >
          > Regards,
          > Yu Hui
          > Twitter: @yuhui
          >
          > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Rod Jacka" <rod@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi Jags,
          > >
          > > The key to this is to tell Google Analytics that the visitors from your paid campaigns are separate to your organic traffic. By default Google Analytics places all visits from its list of recognised search engines into the organic campaign group. One way or another you need to identify a way of allocating the paid search campaigns to the CPC group.
          > >
          > > Do you have have the WebTrends tagging in place (WT.srch=1) in the links from the ads? This is what will cause WebTrends to treat the visits from your paid campaigns separately from your organic search traffic.
          > >
          > > For Google Analytics to treat visitors from the paid search campaigns separately you can use the URL campaign tags yoursite.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=adwords OR you can add the auto tagging URL which will append gclid=.... to the end of the URL automatically.
          > >
          > > The autotagging approach is easiest, however will result in keyword data being shown as (not-set) in the reports.
          > >
          > > To get the data corrected retrospectively you can use segments and I suggest creating a segment that includes visits from organic search but excludes visits with the GUID in the url.
          > >
          > > This will allow you to retrospectively report on the correct data assuming of course that all of your paid search campaigns have this GUID in the URL.
          > >
          > > Happy to take a look at this issue of line and advise in detail if you need further assistance.
          > >
          > > Kind regards
          > >
          > > Rod Jacka
          > > Principal Web Analytics Consultant
          > > Panalysis
          > > http://www.panalysis.com/
          > > http://blog.panalysis.com/
          > >
          > > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Jagruti <jags707@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi all,
          > > >
          > > > My company has two different google analytics account set-up for organic and paid advertising. The paid is handled by an agency and there is absolutely no linkage to it. I run the organic account...We have atlas tags set-up for all the paid campaigns. And when we try to dig into the traffic data that we get from organic in webtrends and Google Analytics, there is a huge discrepancy.
          > > >
          > > > The Google analytics data is always showing more traffic than webtrends. The reason being when we checked the urls being tracked, it is even counting the paid campaign urls with the GUID atlas tags as organic.
          > > >
          > > > I need your help in 2 ways
          > > > - I do not want GA to include the GUID tagged url into organic visits
          > > > - And in the visits report I want it to categorize the visits that came from GUID urls into paid and not into organic search.
          > > >
          > > > What is the best option here?
          > > > 1- Create a filter - what elements and how?
          > > > 2- Exclude URL Query Parameters?- what and how?
          > > >
          > > > Any other suggestions or thoughts??
          > > >
          > > > Please advice..
          > > >
          > > > Thank you..
          > > >
          > > > Jags
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Rod Jacka
          Hi Shawna, Google Analytics will treat all of the traffic from recognised search engines as organic traffic UNLESS there is campaign tagging in place. This is
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
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            Hi Shawna,

            Google Analytics will treat all of the traffic from recognised search engines as organic traffic UNLESS there is campaign tagging in place. This is most typically done in AdWords using auto-tagging which results in the value GCLID=... appearing in the URL. As this is seamlessly integrated into Google AdWords and Google Analytics things just work in most cases.

            For other paid search engines such as Yahoo, you need to add these tags manually. Google provide a tool called the URL builder http://bit.ly/s28Sja to create these tags. Panalysis offers an Excel tool to do this and store the links which you can download from http://panalysis.com/resources/google-analytics-campaign-tracking.aspx

            The same approach applies to all of your marketing where you can control the links to your site. E.g. email, banners, social media posts etc. It is important to tag your campaigns where possible as it helps you to understand the results of your marketing activities and with the new multi funnel channel tool provides you with insights as to how each channel is contributing to your sales, leads or whatever else you are tracking.

            I hope that this assists you.

            Rod Jacka
            Principal Web Analytics Consultant
            Panalysis
            http://www.panalysis.com/
            http://blog.panalysis.com/

            --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Shawna Martin" <smartin@...> wrote:
            >
            > Am I missing something? I go to Traffic Sources/All Traffic in GA and it
            > breaks out the CPC traffic. In addition, under the Content menu I can break
            > out page by Medium, i.e. paid or organic.
            >
            > I'll admit I am not as advanced as the rest of you in that I don't code or
            > manage any e-commerce campaigns. You've (pl.) inspired me to learn basic
            > HTML. Next up, scripting.
            >
            >
            >
            > Shawna Martin
            >
            > LMI ADVERTISING
            >
            > Financial Controller
            >
            > 24E East Roseville Road
            > Lancaster, PA 17601
            > p 717.569.8826 ext. 21
            > f 717.569.9463
            > www.lmiadvertising.com
            >
            > FOLLOW US:
            > <blocked::http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lancaster-PA/LMI-Advertising/6420009
            > 6769> f <blocked::http://twitter.com/LMIAdvertising> t
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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