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Challenging reporting structure setup - airline/travel site

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  • webstrategy360@ymail.com
    Hello everyone, I have a bit of challenging issue in terms of splitting of an airline/travel site s reporting structure. Let s say you ve got an airline
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 29, 2010
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      Hello everyone,

      I have a bit of challenging issue in terms of splitting of an airline/travel site's reporting structure.

      Let's say you've got an airline website such as QatarAirways.com and that you're using Omniture SiteCatalyst.

      There is one main domain of QatarAirways.com and several country site editions such as Qatar English, Qatar Arabic, UK English, UAE Arabic, etc. You've also got a Global site edition for any other country.
      These site editions are split off as folders on the main domain URL (i.e. http://qatarairways.com/qa/en/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/qa/ar/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/uk/en/homepage.html, etc)

      Usually visitors from a country that have a country site edition go to their country site edition. However, there are a lot of visitors that also go to the Global or other country site edition.

      In addition, there are several other pages that are classified as under the Global site edition but are important across all countries. These would include the ticket buying funnel pages as well as the frequent flyer membership signup pages.

      In the airline industry, revenue is generally reported on the departure city of the ticket bought and not based on which site edition or geographical location that the ticket was bought from. So if a ticket from Qatar to Lebanon was bought by a UK visitor on the UAE site edition, the Qatar regional manager would get attributed with that sale.

      Based on the above information, would you split off country reporting based on site edition or by country based on IP address?

      My thinking would be to see what has a stronger correlation: origin country tickets to country site editions or origin country tickets to country IP address. In addition, we'd be marketing to a country audience and not to visitors of a site edition.

      But what do you think? Is there a best practice for doing this kind of reporting for airline sites (specifically with the site structure of qatarairways.com)?

      Would really appreciate the insights of any travel site veterans.
    • adamgreco
      I have not done this for an airline, but we have something pretty similar at Salesforce.com with all of our regional sites. It is a bit too long to explain
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 29, 2010
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        I have not done this for an airline, but we have something pretty similar at Salesforce.com with all of our regional sites. It is a bit too long to explain via a message board, but if you want to correspond via e-mail or phone, you can reach me via my blog at www.the-omni-man.com.

        Adam

        --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "webstrategy360@..." <webstrategy360@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello everyone,
        >
        > I have a bit of challenging issue in terms of splitting of an airline/travel site's reporting structure.
        >
        > Let's say you've got an airline website such as QatarAirways.com and that you're using Omniture SiteCatalyst.
        >
        > There is one main domain of QatarAirways.com and several country site editions such as Qatar English, Qatar Arabic, UK English, UAE Arabic, etc. You've also got a Global site edition for any other country.
        > These site editions are split off as folders on the main domain URL (i.e. http://qatarairways.com/qa/en/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/qa/ar/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/uk/en/homepage.html, etc)
        >
        > Usually visitors from a country that have a country site edition go to their country site edition. However, there are a lot of visitors that also go to the Global or other country site edition.
        >
        > In addition, there are several other pages that are classified as under the Global site edition but are important across all countries. These would include the ticket buying funnel pages as well as the frequent flyer membership signup pages.
        >
        > In the airline industry, revenue is generally reported on the departure city of the ticket bought and not based on which site edition or geographical location that the ticket was bought from. So if a ticket from Qatar to Lebanon was bought by a UK visitor on the UAE site edition, the Qatar regional manager would get attributed with that sale.
        >
        > Based on the above information, would you split off country reporting based on site edition or by country based on IP address?
        >
        > My thinking would be to see what has a stronger correlation: origin country tickets to country site editions or origin country tickets to country IP address. In addition, we'd be marketing to a country audience and not to visitors of a site edition.
        >
        > But what do you think? Is there a best practice for doing this kind of reporting for airline sites (specifically with the site structure of qatarairways.com)?
        >
        > Would really appreciate the insights of any travel site veterans.
        >
      • Yuhui
        Firstly, I d just like to say how amusing it was that you started off with Let s say you ve got an airline website such as QatarAirways.com . To keep things
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2010
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          Firstly, I'd just like to say how amusing it was that you started off with "Let's say you've got an airline website such as QatarAirways.com".

          To keep things simple when reporting for your marketer, I'd suggest at least the following 2 implementations:
          1. One global report suite that tracks the purchase funnel for all sites, regardless of whether they're global, country, site editions, etc.
          Reason: the country/regional manager needs to report on the departure city regardless of which site the customer booked from. The global report suite will let you do that.
          2. Since you're using Omniture, set an eVar that records the site (whether country, global or site edition) that the customer came from.
          Reason: if needed, you can also attribute the sale to the site.

          Hope that helps!

          Regards,
          Yuhui
          Twitter: @yuhui

          --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "webstrategy360@..." <webstrategy360@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello everyone,
          >
          > I have a bit of challenging issue in terms of splitting of an airline/travel site's reporting structure.
          >
          > Let's say you've got an airline website such as QatarAirways.com and that you're using Omniture SiteCatalyst.
          >
          > There is one main domain of QatarAirways.com and several country site editions such as Qatar English, Qatar Arabic, UK English, UAE Arabic, etc. You've also got a Global site edition for any other country.
          > These site editions are split off as folders on the main domain URL (i.e. http://qatarairways.com/qa/en/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/qa/ar/homepage.html, http://qatarairways.com/uk/en/homepage.html, etc)
          >
          > Usually visitors from a country that have a country site edition go to their country site edition. However, there are a lot of visitors that also go to the Global or other country site edition.
          >
          > In addition, there are several other pages that are classified as under the Global site edition but are important across all countries. These would include the ticket buying funnel pages as well as the frequent flyer membership signup pages.
          >
          > In the airline industry, revenue is generally reported on the departure city of the ticket bought and not based on which site edition or geographical location that the ticket was bought from. So if a ticket from Qatar to Lebanon was bought by a UK visitor on the UAE site edition, the Qatar regional manager would get attributed with that sale.
          >
          > Based on the above information, would you split off country reporting based on site edition or by country based on IP address?
          >
          > My thinking would be to see what has a stronger correlation: origin country tickets to country site editions or origin country tickets to country IP address. In addition, we'd be marketing to a country audience and not to visitors of a site edition.
          >
          > But what do you think? Is there a best practice for doing this kind of reporting for airline sites (specifically with the site structure of qatarairways.com)?
          >
          > Would really appreciate the insights of any travel site veterans.
          >
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