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Re: [webanalytics] Visitor personal data informations

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  • Anil Batra
    Terri is right, it depends on laws within country/state and your company polices. Google Analytics does not allow an kind of PII (Personally Identifiable
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1 2:22 PM
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      Terri is right, it depends on laws within country/state and your company
      polices.
      Google Analytics does not allow an kind of PII (Personally Identifiable
      Information) to be tracked, not even IP which most of the people do not
      consider a PII.
      Other analytics tools are flexible, you just have to set up proper tagging
      to pass the data or use tagging to pass the identifier and then an external
      import to tie that identifier with the PII data.
      Currently online advertising, even the ones which use an anonymous cookie,
      is getting a lot of heat from lawmakers and privacy advocates, so you need
      be careful with what you track in the web analytics tool and how you use it.
      If you do trak any PII data make sure your privacy polices clearly state
      your practices.
      On Fri, Aug 1, 2008 at 10:35 AM, Terri Boyle <terri@...> wrote:

      > Vincent,
      > Is it legal? That depends on the laws within your country and company.
      > Many company's have privacy policies that restrain certain analytical
      > tracking. You'd need to find out what your government and/or company's
      > legal requirements are. Certain items that are considered non-personally
      > identifiable may be ok, but those are not the items you are requesting to
      > track. I'm not 100% sure within Google, but I know within other analytical
      > programs, you would need to set-up tagging to gather the information.
      >
      > -Terri Boyle
      >
      > On 8/1/08, vincentdouda <abonewsletter@... <abonewsletter%40yahoo.fr>>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello,
      > >
      > > Is it possible to record personnal infos (name, email adress, phone
      > > number...) on our visitors thanks to a basic web analytics tool
      > > (google analytics...)?
      > > If so is it legal?
      > >
      > > Many thanks
      > >
      > > Vincent
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > ---------------------------------------
      > > The Web Analytics Forum
      > > Founded by Eric T. Peterson (www.webanalyticsdemystified.com)
      > > Moderated by the Web Analytics Association (
      > > www.webanalyticsassociation.org)
      > > Email moderators at: webanalytics-moderators@yahoogroups.comYahoo<webanalytics-moderators%40yahoogroups.comYahoo>!
      > Groups
      > > Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Anil Batra
      http://webanalysis.blogspot.com
      Web Analytics, Behavioral Targeting and Online Advertising Blog
      Web Analytics, SEM and Online Advertising Jobs at
      http://webanalysis.jobamatic.com/a/jbb/find-jobs
      http://webanalyticsjobs.blogspot.com/


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Hailong XIA
      As I know, Google Analytics doesn t allow you to do this. 2008/8/1 Terri Boyle ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 2 4:05 AM
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        As I know, Google Analytics doesn't allow you to do this.

        2008/8/1 Terri Boyle <terri@...>

        > Vincent,
        > Is it legal? That depends on the laws within your country and company.
        > Many company's have privacy policies that restrain certain analytical
        > tracking. You'd need to find out what your government and/or company's
        > legal requirements are. Certain items that are considered non-personally
        > identifiable may be ok, but those are not the items you are requesting to
        > track. I'm not 100% sure within Google, but I know within other analytical
        > programs, you would need to set-up tagging to gather the information.
        >
        > -Terri Boyle
        >
        >
        > On 8/1/08, vincentdouda <abonewsletter@... <abonewsletter%40yahoo.fr>>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello,
        > >
        > > Is it possible to record personnal infos (name, email adress, phone
        > > number...) on our visitors thanks to a basic web analytics tool
        > > (google analytics...)?
        > > If so is it legal?
        > >
        > > Many thanks
        > >
        > > Vincent
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------------
        > > The Web Analytics Forum
        > > Founded by Eric T. Peterson (www.webanalyticsdemystified.com)
        > > Moderated by the Web Analytics Association (
        > > www.webanalyticsassociation.org)
        > > Email moderators at: webanalytics-moderators@yahoogroups.comYahoo<webanalytics-moderators%40yahoogroups.comYahoo>!
        > Groups
        > > Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • crazy_about_scuba
        GA can t do this, but most of the big boys (Coremetrics, Webtrends etc) can move form data on a webpage into a database when the user clicks submit & associate
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 2 5:07 AM
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          GA can't do this, but most of the big boys (Coremetrics, Webtrends
          etc) can move form data on a webpage into a database when the user
          clicks submit & associate the data with the 1st party cookie (you can
          interface the data with other back-office databases, CRM etc). Won't
          be cheap though!

          Best of luck!
          Justin

          --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "vincentdouda"
          <abonewsletter@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello,
          >
          > Is it possible to record personnal infos (name, email adress, phone
          > number...) on our visitors thanks to a basic web analytics tool
          > (google analytics...)?
          > If so is it legal?
          >
          > Many thanks
          >
          > Vincent
          >
        • vincentdouda
          Thank you very much to all of you for your pretty clear answers. Cheers vincent
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 4 12:02 AM
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            Thank you very much to all of you for your pretty clear answers.

            Cheers

            vincent
          • Sergio Maldonado
            hi again, Vincent I will join this one at the eleventh hour to add a few of points, as I deal with this quite often: - Technically, this is perfectly feasible.
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 17 6:40 AM
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              hi again, Vincent

              I will join this one at the eleventh hour to add a few of points, as I
              deal with this quite often:

              - Technically, this is perfectly feasible.

              - It is easy to comply with most national provisions regarding the use
              of cookies.

              - Regarding the limitations imposed by SaaS providers, all of them
              wash their hands when dealing with the "processing" of personal data
              through their systems (the GA terms are well known, but have a look at
              the standard contract clauses of whatever paid service you are using).

              - Regarding the legal limitations, EU law provides the common ground:
              You will become a "data controller" from the moment you start
              gathering personal data, with the vendor becoming a "data processor"
              if following the ASP model (SaaS). This simply means you have to go
              through the list of requirements imposed by the Data Protection
              Directive (as implemented in France, if this is where you are).

              - As to the most crucial point, "what is personal data", you need to
              refer to your national (French, I guess) data protection agency. All
              EU national agencies are coordinated by the "Group of the 29" (as in
              article 29), whose most recent finding is that IP addresses will be
              personal data (and oblige you to comply) if you are a telecoms company
              or an ISP. Then prepare for imaginative local initiatives (a DNI
              -national id card- is not personal data in Spain, but a car's plate or
              cell phone number will be).

              Finally, I can even point to a local Paris lawyer who is extremely
              good at these things (if you happen to get yourself into a mess :).

              I hope it helps.

              Regards,





              On Mon, Aug 4, 2008 at 9:02 AM, vincentdouda <abonewsletter@...> wrote:
              > Thank you very much to all of you for your pretty clear answers.
              >
              > Cheers
              >
              > vincent
              >
              >
            • vincentdouda
              Thanks again Sergio!
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 18 5:35 AM
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                Thanks again Sergio!

                --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Sergio Maldonado"
                <sergio.maldonado.elvira@...> wrote:
                >
                > hi again, Vincent
                >
                > I will join this one at the eleventh hour to add a few of points, as I
                > deal with this quite often:
                >
                > - Technically, this is perfectly feasible.
                >
                > - It is easy to comply with most national provisions regarding the use
                > of cookies.
                >
                > - Regarding the limitations imposed by SaaS providers, all of them
                > wash their hands when dealing with the "processing" of personal data
                > through their systems (the GA terms are well known, but have a look at
                > the standard contract clauses of whatever paid service you are using).
                >
                > - Regarding the legal limitations, EU law provides the common ground:
                > You will become a "data controller" from the moment you start
                > gathering personal data, with the vendor becoming a "data processor"
                > if following the ASP model (SaaS). This simply means you have to go
                > through the list of requirements imposed by the Data Protection
                > Directive (as implemented in France, if this is where you are).
                >
                > - As to the most crucial point, "what is personal data", you need to
                > refer to your national (French, I guess) data protection agency. All
                > EU national agencies are coordinated by the "Group of the 29" (as in
                > article 29), whose most recent finding is that IP addresses will be
                > personal data (and oblige you to comply) if you are a telecoms company
                > or an ISP. Then prepare for imaginative local initiatives (a DNI
                > -national id card- is not personal data in Spain, but a car's plate or
                > cell phone number will be).
                >
                > Finally, I can even point to a local Paris lawyer who is extremely
                > good at these things (if you happen to get yourself into a mess :).
                >
                > I hope it helps.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > On Mon, Aug 4, 2008 at 9:02 AM, vincentdouda <abonewsletter@...> wrote:
                > > Thank you very much to all of you for your pretty clear answers.
                > >
                > > Cheers
                > >
                > > vincent
                > >
                > >
                >
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