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Web Analytics vs Tealeaf

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  • Kurt Slater
    With all the Tealeaf commentary, I m curious how people would respond to the question I ve been presented with lately. I think everyone agrees that even with a
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 28, 2008
      With all the Tealeaf commentary, I'm curious how people would respond to the question I've been presented with lately.

      I think everyone agrees that even with a fully and correctly implemented analytics tool, such as Omniture or WebTrends; a tool such as Tealeaf can still provide additional insights at very granular levels.

      The questions and discussions I'm involved in are the opposite angle. With a fully implemented Tealeaf solution, what additional value does an analytics tools provide?

      Clearly the real value of a good analytics tool is the aggregation of data to provide actionable reports, but I would contend that's not really that hard with the right tools. With a large organization, having the proper resources to collect and warehouse the volume of data seems to be the real challenge. If you've solved that, as you need to with Tealeaf, then why not take advantage of that data as your source of web analytics? Moving that data into BI tools provides a lot more reporting and analysis capability than any off-the-shelf analytics product. Sure you give up the simplistic exec-level and manager reports, but in my experience they are too simplistic anyway for more complex business models. In my environment, nearly all our key reports are assembled outside of the analytics tool (in my case Omniture) because of our desire to overlay data in ways that are very specific to our business.

      I've read various posts and articles on the subject, including Eric's Tealeaf white paper; but I think they all assume the ability to aggregate highly-granular isn't available to most organizations, and I agree. Large organizations that live off their data are a different story though.

      If you've got all your Tealeaf data nicely organized and available to BI tools, along with the skill sets to use those tools and create standard reports as well as deep dive analysis on the same data; what are you loosing if you don't have an analytics package? You certainly save money by not collecting the same data twice.

      Thoughts?

      Kurt
    • Vikram Aditya Kirpalani
      Hey hello, Sibel, Hope you are well, Thanks for taking out time and replying to my post, it was really helpful :)
      Message 36 of 36 , May 15 10:06 AM
        Hey hello, Sibel,
        Hope you are well,
        Thanks for taking out time and replying to my post, it was really helpful :)
        --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, sibel <airsibel@...> wrote:
        >
        > Initial implementation (setting up servers and starting to collect data) is
        > really short and easy but then setting up events, replays, dashboards score
        > cards are the real implementation part where you configure dATA. And it can
        > take up from 30 days to 90 days depending on work
        >
        > thanks
        > sibel akcekaya
        >
        >
        > On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 1:09 PM, Vikram Aditya Kirpalani <
        > sparco_dude@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > Does Anyone knows, what does it takes to implement Tealeaf, including how
        > > much time does it takes to get implemented to a normal site, on average
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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