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Re: This posting demonstrates one of the centr al issues in analytics today ...

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  • Debora Geary
    Which begs the question.... where are all the web analytics Girls??? This list is definitely guy heavy... :-P! ... All joking aside. I too have seen a
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 23, 2005
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      Which begs the question.... where are all the web analytics
      Girls??? This list is definitely guy heavy... :-P!

      --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Ross Jenkins <analytx101@y...>
      wrote:
      > I am glad you said it first..this is a very very positive trend.
      All joking aside. I too have seen a dramatic increase in requests
      for Web Analytic Guys..many other verticals beyond retail are
      simply 'getting it'. It is also reflected positively in salary and I
      think we will continue to see a trend in demand over the next few
      years as WA takes center stage as the clearinghouse tool for web
      performance managers.
      >
      > Become a part of the WAA group ASAP and continue the momentum.
      >
      >
      > Michael Horn <mhorn@n...> wrote:
      > This is a very interesting thread, and to tie us back to
      > the so-called $64,000 question, have there been any salary
      > surveys of our fast-growing field?
      >
      > Do we forsee bidding wars for our services? Black market
      > analytics dealers? Militias for hire brandishing slide
      > rules and Excel toolbars?
      >
      > Answer quickly -- before my boss joins the list!
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Michael
      >
      > Michael D. Horn | npr online analyst | mhorn@n... | 202.513.2458
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Chris Grant [mailto:chrisgrantaa@y...]
      > Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2005 12:26 AM
      > To: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [webanalytics] Re: This posting demonstrates one of the
      central
      > issues in analytics today ...
      >
      > The 300 jobs collapse down to 17-25 actual analytics jobs, more or
      > less. I agree with Debora and Eric about 1) too few people and 2)
      > insufficient or inappropriate skills. But lately I don't think
      it's
      > exceptional.
      >
      > By coincidence I spent some time last week paring down the
      > www.indeed.com listings (to give my manager some perspective
      > although it ended up giving ME pause). The 270+ listings had tons
      > of duplicates and jobs in which w.a. was only a small part. It
      > ended up like this:
      > - 17 jobs I'd consider to be web analytics positions
      > - 8 interactive agency jobs with a good proportion of web
      > analytics
      > - 26 marketing jobs with a web analytics aspect
      > - 9 search engine marketing jobs with some analytics
      > - 40 web analytics vendor jobs, of which almost half are sales
      > - 15 webmaster or web manager jobs with an analytics aspect
      > - 4 jobs that are analysts, but mostly marketing non-web
      > - 11 jobs that are programming positions where web analytics
      is
      > part of the system
      >
      > Everything's relative (maybe 17's not such a small number for one
      > point in time), so to get the relative view I looked at some other
      > jobs I know something about in specialized subareas within market
      > research, product development, and human interface work, where
      > professional associations are somewhat established or getting
      going,
      > without having reached maturity as a profession.
      >
      > In the end, I feel, and this is just my subjective opinion, that
      > I've been a little overexcited about the state of our little
      field.
      > I didn't see anything remarkable about the scale of demand in
      > w.a. compared to the other professions I looked at. And
      considering
      > that it's not exactly rocket science, I'm just going to settle
      down
      > to do a darn good job at it and not inflate its state or fate.
      > Besides, our automated tools are getting so good that whatever
      > skills I have now will be less important as time goes on, and the
      > current blip in interest will turn into something fairly routine
      > (not unimportant, but routine).
      >
      > Chris Grant
      > Web Analytics Strategist
      > Enlighten - Ann Arbor
      > http://www.enlighten.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------------
      > Web Metrics Discussion Group
      > Moderated by Eric T. Peterson
      > Author, Web Analytics Demystified
      > http://www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
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      > ---------------------------------------
      > Web Metrics Discussion Group
      > Moderated by Eric T. Peterson
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      > http://www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
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