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Here is something interesting that popped out of the blogosphere ...

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  • Eric Peterson
    http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-times-more-clicks.html I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is getting ROI
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
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      http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-times-more-clicks.html

      I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is getting
      ROI on their investment in web analytics. This guy, Scout Marketing
      (not his real name I assume but his profile is 404) apparently talked
      to Ilieva Ageenko (whom I have talked to in the past and so I can
      vouch for her accent) and got her to share this:

      1) Optimizing house ads can produce a quick ROI for Web analytics
      investments, which makes upper management happy.

      2) Media buyers should ask about average page visit time for each
      section of a site when planning creative placements.

      3) Although just under 50% of US households have broadband
      connections, around 80% of at-work Web surfers are on broadband. Since
      many people do personal surfing at work, business-to-consumer sites
      may have far higher broadband users than you think.

      While #3 is no great insight, #2 is actually pretty insightful and #1
      is something that so many companies forget to actually do (produce
      quick ROI, make upper management happy).

      I wonder why Wachovia's vendor is not named in the piece? I don't
      suppose Mr. Scout Marketing is a member of this varied tribe and would
      care to comment?

      Anyway, nice little piece about how one of the bigger banks is getting ROI.
      --
      Eric T. Peterson
      Author, Web Analytics Demystified
      www.webanalyticsdemystified.com

      Have you joined the Metrics Discussion Group? Email
      webanalytics-subscribe@yahoogroups.com to join today!
    • Mayer Gniwisch
      nice catch, Mayer ... From: Eric Peterson [mailto:eric.peterson@gmail.com] Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 12:43 AM To: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
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        nice catch,
         
        Mayer
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Eric Peterson [mailto:eric.peterson@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 12:43 AM
        To: webanalytics@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [webanalytics] Here is something interesting that popped out of the blogosphere ...

        http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-times-more-clicks.html

        I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is getting
        ROI on their investment in web analytics.  This guy, Scout Marketing
        (not his real name I assume but his profile is 404) apparently talked
        to Ilieva Ageenko (whom I have talked to in the past and so I can
        vouch for her accent) and got her to share this:

        1)  Optimizing house ads can produce a quick ROI for Web analytics
        investments, which makes upper management happy.

        2)  Media buyers should ask about average page visit time for each
        section of a site when planning creative placements.

        3)  Although just under 50% of US households have broadband
        connections, around 80% of at-work Web surfers are on broadband. Since
        many people do personal surfing at work, business-to-consumer sites
        may have far higher broadband users than you think.

        While #3 is no great insight, #2 is actually pretty insightful and #1
        is something that so many companies forget to actually do (produce
        quick ROI, make upper management happy).

        I wonder why Wachovia's vendor is not named in the piece?  I don't
        suppose Mr. Scout Marketing is a member of this varied tribe and would
        care to comment?

        Anyway, nice little piece about how one of the bigger banks is getting ROI.
        --
        Eric T. Peterson
        Author, Web Analytics Demystified
        www.webanalyticsdemystified.com

        Have you joined the Metrics Discussion Group?  Email
        webanalytics-subscribe@yahoogroups.com to join today!



        ---------------------------------------
        Web Metrics Discussion Group
        Moderated by Eric T. Peterson
        Author, Web Analytics Demystified
        http://www.webanalyticsdemystified.com


      • Eric Peterson
        http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-times-more-clicks.html I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is getting ROI
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
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          http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-times-more-clicks.html

          I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is getting
          ROI on their investment in web analytics. This guy, Scout Marketing
          (not his real name I assume but his profile is 404) apparently talked
          to Ilieva Ageenko (whom I have talked to in the past and so I can
          vouch for her accent) and got her to share this:

          1) Optimizing house ads can produce a quick ROI for Web analytics
          investments, which makes upper management happy.

          2) Media buyers should ask about average page visit time for each
          section of a site when planning creative placements.

          3) Although just under 50% of US households have broadband
          connections, around 80% of at-work Web surfers are on broadband. Since
          many people do personal surfing at work, business-to-consumer sites
          may have far higher broadband users than you think.

          While #3 is no great insight, #2 is actually pretty insightful and #1
          is something that so many companies forget to actually do (produce
          quick ROI, make upper management happy).

          I wonder why Wachovia's vendor is not named in the piece? I don't
          suppose Mr. Scout Marketing is a member of this varied tribe and would
          care to comment?

          Anyway, nice little piece about how one of the bigger banks is getting ROI.
          --
          Eric T. Peterson
          Author, Web Analytics Demystified
          www.webanalyticsdemystified.com

          Have you joined the Metrics Discussion Group? Email
          webanalytics-subscribe@yahoogroups.com to join today!
        • mlillig2002
          Our sister company Engine Ready works with a handful of online financial companies. By providing a combination of web analytics and search engine marketing
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
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            Our sister company Engine Ready works with a handful of online
            financial companies. By providing a combination of web analytics
            and search engine marketing services, we've seen some great returns
            on these sites ourselves. These financial companies make great
            clients.

            The other successful industries with strong ROI has been kitchen
            housewares and online pharmacy drug companies we deal with.

            An example:

            For the month of January 2005, one client spent:
            - $83,687 on 9 pay per click campaigns
            - Generated a revenue of $582,329.
            - Return on advertising spend (ROAS) was 695%.
            - 6,110 orders.
            - The Cost per Aquisition (CPA) of $13.69 was kept well below their
            budget.
            - Average Cost Per Click (CPC) was only $0.26.

            Compare that to when they started with us 16 months ago:
            - $62,178 on only 3 active pay per click campaigns
            - Generated a revenue of $256,977.
            - Return on advertising spend (ROAS) was 413%.
            - 2,453 orders.
            - The Cost per Aquisition (CPA) was $25.34 and
            - Average Cost Per Click (CPC) was $0.62.

            This is a great example of how a site can use their data to improve
            their online marketing efforts. Were they profitable when they
            started? Yes. But look at their numbers now.
            - They're spending way more in advertising because they tripled
            their campaigns
            - It's costing them $11.65 less to acquire a customer
            - Their average cost per click is down $0.36 and
            - Their retun jumped $282%!

            For the year of 2004, they spent $1,118,135 on PPC advertising and
            generated a revenue of $8,147,696

            I wonder if they're hiring. :)



            --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Eric Peterson
            <eric.peterson@g...> wrote:
            > http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-
            times-more-clicks.html
            >
            > I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is
            getting
            > ROI on their investment in web analytics. This guy, Scout
            Marketing
            > (not his real name I assume but his profile is 404) apparently
            talked
            > to Ilieva Ageenko (whom I have talked to in the past and so I can
            > vouch for her accent) and got her to share this:
            >
            > 1) Optimizing house ads can produce a quick ROI for Web analytics
            > investments, which makes upper management happy.
            >
            > 2) Media buyers should ask about average page visit time for each
            > section of a site when planning creative placements.
            >
            > 3) Although just under 50% of US households have broadband
            > connections, around 80% of at-work Web surfers are on broadband.
            Since
            > many people do personal surfing at work, business-to-consumer sites
            > may have far higher broadband users than you think.
            >
            > While #3 is no great insight, #2 is actually pretty insightful and
            #1
            > is something that so many companies forget to actually do (produce
            > quick ROI, make upper management happy).
            >
            > I wonder why Wachovia's vendor is not named in the piece? I don't
            > suppose Mr. Scout Marketing is a member of this varied tribe and
            would
            > care to comment?
            >
            > Anyway, nice little piece about how one of the bigger banks is
            getting ROI.
            > --
            > Eric T. Peterson
            > Author, Web Analytics Demystified
            > www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
            >
            > Have you joined the Metrics Discussion Group? Email
            > webanalytics-subscribe@yahoogroups.com to join today!
          • David Culbertson
            Eric: This information is taken almost verbatim from a Marketing Sherpa e- mail that was sent out on Monday. It was contained solely within the body of the
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 2, 2005
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              Eric:

              This information is taken almost verbatim from a Marketing Sherpa e-
              mail that was sent out on Monday. It was contained solely within the
              body of the e-mail, instead of the usual Marketing Sherpa approach of
              providing a teaser with a link to the full article on their website.

              The article was clearly authored by Marketing Sherpa staff. To answer
              your question about the vendor, here is the missing final line from
              the article:

              "By the way, I want to give credit to Wachovia's new analytics firm,
              WebSideStory, for introducing me to Ilieva. Thanks!"

              David Culbertson
              www.lightbulbinteractive.com

              --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, Eric Peterson
              <eric.peterson@g...> wrote:
              > http://scoutmarketing.blogspot.com/2005/01/how-wachovia-got-20-
              times-more-clicks.html
              >
              > I stumbled on this teeny-tiny little piece on how Wachovia is
              getting
              > ROI on their investment in web analytics. This guy, Scout Marketing
              > (not his real name I assume but his profile is 404) apparently
              talked
              > to Ilieva Ageenko (whom I have talked to in the past and so I can
              > vouch for her accent) and got her to share this:
              >
              > 1) Optimizing house ads can produce a quick ROI for Web analytics
              > investments, which makes upper management happy.
              >
              > 2) Media buyers should ask about average page visit time for each
              > section of a site when planning creative placements.
              >
              > 3) Although just under 50% of US households have broadband
              > connections, around 80% of at-work Web surfers are on broadband.
              Since
              > many people do personal surfing at work, business-to-consumer sites
              > may have far higher broadband users than you think.
              >
              > While #3 is no great insight, #2 is actually pretty insightful and
              #1
              > is something that so many companies forget to actually do (produce
              > quick ROI, make upper management happy).
              >
              > I wonder why Wachovia's vendor is not named in the piece? I don't
              > suppose Mr. Scout Marketing is a member of this varied tribe and
              would
              > care to comment?
              >
              > Anyway, nice little piece about how one of the bigger banks is
              getting ROI.
              > --
              > Eric T. Peterson
              > Author, Web Analytics Demystified
              > www.webanalyticsdemystified.com
              >
              > Have you joined the Metrics Discussion Group? Email
              > webanalytics-subscribe@yahoogroups.com to join today!
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