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3099RE: [webanalytics] Re: Behavioral differences in group that blocks 3rd party cookies?

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  • john marshall
    Aug 2, 2005
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      Thanks for clarifying that you do mean blocking.

      I also should back-pedal on my statement that blocking is 'rare'. It's less
      common than deletion, but it is indeed increasing. I don't mean to downplay
      the importance of the problem of blocking.


      John Marshall

      > Subject: [webanalytics] Re: Behavioral differences in group
      > that blocks 3rd party cookies?
      >
      > Thanks for your response -
      >
      > I agree that, intuitively, missing 15% seems problematic.
      >
      > What I am looking for is something beyond that, however.
      >
      > Some data/evidence to back up or defeat the assertion that
      > ... as the sample of Internet users who do NOT block 3rd
      > party cookies (and I do mean block) diminishes ... that that
      > shrinking sample will lose its value as a source of web
      > analytics data. That, at some point, data on that group's
      > behavior cannot meaningfully or reliably be extrapolated to the whole.
      >
      > --- In webanalytics@yahoogroups.com, "Amer, Mike" <mamer@v...> wrote:
      > > > Blocking and rejection of third party cookies is rare. Did you
      > perhaps
      > > > intend to ask for data on those that *delete* third party
      > cookies?
      > > That
      > > > is much more common.
      > >
      > > Third party cookies being blocked isn't exactly rare. Eric's
      > blog
      > > has an entry that mentions numbers from Coremetrics and WebTrends
      > that
      > > are both around 15%.
      > >
      > http://weblogs.jupiterresearch.com/analysts/peterson/archives/009497.
      > htm
      > > l If my analytics solution depended upon third-party cookies to
      > track
      > > visitors, I would find this very troubling.
      > >
      > > I suppose that with 85% of traffic being reported, you can
      > still make
      > > directional decisions. But if you are using web analytics to power
      > > other marketing efforts, then missing out on 15% of traffic is a
      > pretty
      > > big deal.
      > >
      > > - Mike Amer
      > > Victoria's Secret
      >
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