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10281Re: [webanalytics] can we measure the contextuality?

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  • Maurizio Fionda
    Apr 5, 2007
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      Hi Dave,

      in your message you use the word "intelligently" and I agree at the moment
      you can only use words like those: "better", "worse", "good", "bad", etc..
      As you can see we still work in a subjective world.


      I think that at the present time, despite all the data we collect, we
      actually produce only very little knowledge because of the lack of
      abstraction from the context (where the data comes from). Every single
      funnel inside every single website has different qualities, different
      meanings and we are missing the opportunity to share knowledge.

      In an effort to build a metric (an objective system of evaluation) there's
      a necessary tendency to abstract from the context as continuously as
      possible.

      I start thinking along these lines because I work in the email marketing
      industry and here we are channelling significant resources into producing
      meaningful k.p.i. for our customers and we are working to build a metric
      and "objectify" knowledge. I believe this is an exciting domain in which
      to define or discover new rules and use them to evaluate scenarios and
      take decisions in a much less subjective manner.

      It's not an easy task, I know - but I strongly believe we can do it.

      > Hi, Maurizio,
      >
      >
      >
      > I think that if you are designing your pages intelligently, each step
      > along
      >
      > the buying path will have its own context. For example, the call to action
      >
      > on the landing page may be to view product details. The product details
      >
      > page may have, as its call to action, adding to the shopping cart. The
      > cart
      >
      > may have purchase. And so on, throughout the entire path.
      >
      >
      >
      > So the desired action will vary as the context will vary -- this is not
      >
      > anything new. ROI may be applied to the entire process, but as many steps
      >
      > affect the overall process, it would be difficult to use this as an
      >
      > effective Key Performance Indicator (KPI). Instead, step-wise iteration
      > for
      >
      > each individual page along the path should be optimized, using the KPI for
      >
      > that particular page.
      >
      >
      >
      > Increasing ROI may, however, be a good KPI for determining whether or not
      >
      > your testing and measurement process (the process of applying web
      > analytics
      >
      > to a site) is effective or not (assuming that you are not changing the
      >
      > drivers of traffic to your site, as each segment of that has its own
      >
      > "natural" ROI).
      >
      >
      >
      > Good question! What made you start thinking along these lines?
      >
      >
      >
      > WDave
      >
      >
      >
      > On 4/2/07, fionda@... <fionda@...> wrote:
      >
      >>
      >
      >>
      >
      >>
      >
      >> We should first define what we mean by "context".
      >
      >>
      >
      >> In a dictionary we would find: "the set of facts or circumstances that
      >
      >> surround a situation or event".
      >
      >>
      >
      >> Let's say the situation or event here is the "call to action".
      >
      >>
      >
      >> How do we measure, then, whether a call to action is in context or not
      >> and
      >
      >> how much?
      >
      >>
      >
      >> I think the only way to measure what is an abstract concept is in
      >
      >> relationship to an object in the real world, let's say "the ROI".
      >
      >>
      >
      >> If we take the ROI as a criterion we can assume that higher ROI involves
      >> a
      >
      >> higher value for the relationship between "call to action" and
      >> "context".
      >
      >>
      >
      >> Finally we can use this axiom to develop the mathematics needed to
      >
      >> evaluate a priori what is the most suitable and better-performing
      >> context
      >
      >> to use for a call to action.
      >
      >>
      >
      >> If we accept the condition that a negative value can have better ROI we
      >
      >> will loose this precious relationship.
      >
      >>
      >
      >> Any other clue how to measure?
      >
      >>
      >


      --
      Maurizio Fionda
      Diennea Italy
      www.mag-news.com
      Technologies for marketing
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