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RE: [wdmotorcycles] brown paint

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  • GARY SKINNER
    Hi, I saw in the latest issue of the MVT magazine a picture of Peter Browns G3L finished in Brown, knowing how Peter likes to get it right when he is restoring
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 1, 2006
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      Hi, I saw in the latest issue of the MVT magazine a picture of Peter Browns
      G3L finished in Brown, knowing how Peter likes to get it right when he is
      restoring a bike, prehaps he could comment ?.
      Best Regards
      Gary
      PS. Peter how about posting a few photos for the group to see.


      >From: "lone gunman" <pvt237@...>
      >Reply-To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
      >To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [wdmotorcycles] brown paint
      >Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2006 01:03:14 -0000
      >
      >ok brown paint on wd bikes, there were a few painted with brown
      >paint,was this due to lack of green or were they trying something a
      >bit different? my co has an interesting wartime paint scheme with
      >lots of brown components and odd splodges, though this is more likely
      >down to a workshop erk having a pot of brown paint handy for touch up,
      >it may be an attempt at camouflage? whats peoples thoughts on brown
      >parts and colour schemes?
      >

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Rik
      According to Hodges & Taylor in British Military Markings 1939 - 1945 , Army SCC (Standard camouflage colours) were introduced in 1941 and SCC no. 2 -
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 2, 2006
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        According to Hodges & Taylor in "British Military Markings 1939 -
        1945", Army SCC (Standard camouflage colours) were introduced in
        1941 and SCC no. 2 - described as "cup of coffee and milk" - seems
        to have become the official colour from May 1942.

        From April 1944 onwards, an Olive Drab colour similar to American
        vehicles was adopted.

        This would seem to suggest that vehicles produced between early 1942
        and early 1944 began life with the brown colour scheme.










        --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, "GARY SKINNER" <garys339@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi, I saw in the latest issue of the MVT magazine a picture of
        Peter Browns
        > G3L finished in Brown, knowing how Peter likes to get it right
        when he is
        > restoring a bike, prehaps he could comment ?.
        > Best Regards
        > Gary
        > PS. Peter how about posting a few photos for the group to see.
        >
        >
        > >From: "lone gunman" <pvt237@...>
        > >Reply-To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
        > >To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
        > >Subject: [wdmotorcycles] brown paint
        > >Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2006 01:03:14 -0000
        > >
        > >ok brown paint on wd bikes, there were a few painted with brown
        > >paint,was this due to lack of green or were they trying something
        a
        > >bit different? my co has an interesting wartime paint scheme with
        > >lots of brown components and odd splodges, though this is more
        likely
        > >down to a workshop erk having a pot of brown paint handy for
        touch up,
        > >it may be an attempt at camouflage? whats peoples thoughts on
        brown
        > >parts and colour schemes?
        > >
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > Windows Live™ Messenger has arrived. Click here to download it for
        free!
        > http://imagine-msn.com/messenger/launch80/?locale=en-gb
        >
      • Jan Jansen
        I ve worked on 3 Royal Enfields Flying Fleas (of 1943) and indeed they had still remains of brown paint (2 inside the headlamp) Also I know 2 James ML s of
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 3, 2006
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          I've worked on 3 Royal Enfields Flying Fleas (of 1943) and indeed they had still remains of brown paint (2 inside the headlamp)  Also I know 2 James ML's of 1943 that have still remains of brown paint. I've also worked on 3 other Fleas, which had remains of green paint and they were from 1944-1945. Also a James ML of 1944 had green paint remains.
          I know of a friend who have a Royal Enfield C of 1939/1940, that the original paint was green.
          Most Welbikes I know of (with original paint) are brown too. Also BSA folding bicycles are in green and brown paint.
           
          So it would be most likely that during 1939-1941 the normal color was green, later they make it brown and at the end they get back with green paint. (maybe by seeing all those USA vehicles, which were normaly green)
           
          But true the 1939-1945 years they will have used green ones too (all times), in desert they've used sand-yellow color too. Begin WW2 some vehicle were paint with a kind of Mickey Mouse camouflage. At Malta they used a stone-camouflage. During winter some vehicles were painted white. Other kind of camouflage were used too.
           
          During war also not all pigments were there at some times, so lots of different kind of green, brown, sand-yellow were used. Some vehicles were repaint during the war. A few RAF vehicles were painted grey-blue, but most RAF vehicles were just green or brown.
           
          So when you paint your vehicle green, brown or sand-yellow it will be a very normal used color for your vehicle during WW2. Some people like green more, others brown, I'll leave that up to you own choise.
           
          When I've find old original paint remains on a motorcycle, I'll repaint it in that color.
           


          Try the all-new Yahoo! Mail . "The New Version is radically easier to use" – The Wall Street Journal
        • lone gunman
          when i get on with the repainting its probably going to be in brown no2 , with the odd bit of green as not all of it needs re doing, the overpainting im going
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 3, 2006
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            when i get on with the repainting its probably going to be in brown
            no2 , with the odd bit of green as not all of it needs re doing, the
            overpainting im going to be careful taking off as i want to see if
            there are any markings underneath, would be interesting if there
            were as this would give a clue as to where the bike served, using
            the original colour scheme is the best way of doing things, was
            wondering about it with the change, maybe it was the american
            influence that we went back to using predominantly green,








            --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, Jan Jansen <the_axman44@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I've worked on 3 Royal Enfields Flying Fleas (of 1943) and indeed
            they had still remains of brown paint (2 inside the headlamp) Also
            I know 2 James ML's of 1943 that have still remains of brown paint.
            I've also worked on 3 other Fleas, which had remains of green paint
            and they were from 1944-1945. Also a James ML of 1944 had green
            paint remains.
            > I know of a friend who have a Royal Enfield C of 1939/1940, that
            the original paint was green.
            > Most Welbikes I know of (with original paint) are brown too.
            Also BSA folding bicycles are in green and brown paint.
            >
            > So it would be most likely that during 1939-1941 the normal
            color was green, later they make it brown and at the end they get
            back with green paint. (maybe by seeing all those USA vehicles,
            which were normaly green)
            >
            > But true the 1939-1945 years they will have used green ones too
            (all times), in desert they've used sand-yellow color too. Begin WW2
            some vehicle were paint with a kind of Mickey Mouse camouflage. At
            Malta they used a stone-camouflage. During winter some vehicles were
            painted white. Other kind of camouflage were used too.
            >
            > During war also not all pigments were there at some times, so
            lots of different kind of green, brown, sand-yellow were used. Some
            vehicles were repaint during the war. A few RAF vehicles were
            painted grey-blue, but most RAF vehicles were just green or brown.
            >
            > So when you paint your vehicle green, brown or sand-yellow it
            will be a very normal used color for your vehicle during WW2. Some
            people like green more, others brown, I'll leave that up to you own
            choise.
            >
            > When I've find old original paint remains on a motorcycle, I'll
            repaint it in that color.
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Try the all-new Yahoo! Mail . "The New Version is radically
            easier to use" – The Wall Street Journal
            >
          • Rik
            The inference seems to be that the British use of Olive drab was to standardise colour schemes prior to Normandy although the first mention of it was in April
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 3, 2006
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              The inference seems to be that the British use of Olive drab was to
              standardise colour schemes prior to Normandy although the first
              mention of it was in April 1944 which Taylor suggests was rather
              late for Normandy if it was not already in widespread use. Existing
              vehicles were not to be repainted until necessary and all stocks of
              SCC no.2 used up.

              The only exception to the colour change was Bailey Bridge components
              which were kept brown to distinguish them from American parts.

              The brown shade is fairly close to the colour of Battledress so its
              use was perhaps not so strange.

              My 1939 16H was clearly originally finished in Khaki Green no.3,
              including the Lucas components, although the cvc lid has the pre-war
              Service Green underneath. Major components on mine have a brush
              finish splinter camouflage in dark green also (presumably this was
              Dark Green no.4)

              Pigments did vary and certainly after fading, the Olive Drab was
              close to the older KG no.3 It would seem therefore that the only
              obviously wrong scheme would be an early machine
              portraying "Dunkirk" era in brown.







              --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, "lone gunman" <pvt237@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > when i get on with the repainting its probably going to be in
              brown
              > no2 , with the odd bit of green as not all of it needs re doing,
              the
              > overpainting im going to be careful taking off as i want to see if
              > there are any markings underneath, would be interesting if there
              > were as this would give a clue as to where the bike served, using
              > the original colour scheme is the best way of doing things, was
              > wondering about it with the change, maybe it was the american
              > influence that we went back to using predominantly green,
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, Jan Jansen <the_axman44@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > I've worked on 3 Royal Enfields Flying Fleas (of 1943) and
              indeed
              > they had still remains of brown paint (2 inside the headlamp)
              Also
              > I know 2 James ML's of 1943 that have still remains of brown
              paint.
              > I've also worked on 3 other Fleas, which had remains of green
              paint
              > and they were from 1944-1945. Also a James ML of 1944 had green
              > paint remains.
              > > I know of a friend who have a Royal Enfield C of 1939/1940,
              that
              > the original paint was green.
              > > Most Welbikes I know of (with original paint) are brown too.
              > Also BSA folding bicycles are in green and brown paint.
              > >
              > > So it would be most likely that during 1939-1941 the normal
              > color was green, later they make it brown and at the end they get
              > back with green paint. (maybe by seeing all those USA vehicles,
              > which were normaly green)
              > >
              > > But true the 1939-1945 years they will have used green ones
              too
              > (all times), in desert they've used sand-yellow color too. Begin
              WW2
              > some vehicle were paint with a kind of Mickey Mouse camouflage. At
              > Malta they used a stone-camouflage. During winter some vehicles
              were
              > painted white. Other kind of camouflage were used too.
              > >
              > > During war also not all pigments were there at some times, so
              > lots of different kind of green, brown, sand-yellow were used.
              Some
              > vehicles were repaint during the war. A few RAF vehicles were
              > painted grey-blue, but most RAF vehicles were just green or brown.
              > >
              > > So when you paint your vehicle green, brown or sand-yellow it
              > will be a very normal used color for your vehicle during WW2. Some
              > people like green more, others brown, I'll leave that up to you
              own
              > choise.
              > >
              > > When I've find old original paint remains on a motorcycle,
              I'll
              > repaint it in that color.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Try the all-new Yahoo! Mail . "The New Version is radically
              > easier to use" – The Wall Street Journal
              > >
              >
            • p.brown@research-int.com
              Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails buzzing. There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this web site which outlines
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 4, 2006
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                Message
                Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails buzzing.
                There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this web site which outlines approximately when the colours changed from a green to brown and then to Olive Drab.
                 
                As other members have commented although there are dates when new painting instructions were issued there are no definitive dates as to when individual manufacturers would have changed as they would have used up available stocks at the time on whatever contracts they were working on.
                 
                I know my G3L was manufactured mid 1943 which co-incided with the SCC No 2 Service Brown "period" and as there was evidence of brown found on the bike (although there was probably more green) I chose to repaint it brown. I also chose to do the same with my James ML (see attached) which is also of 1943 manufacturer and whose tool box was brown inside.
                 
                However to show that I am not entirely brown by name and brown by nature my 1944 Triumph 3HW is olive drab.
                 
                cheers
                Peter(Service) Brown
                 
                 
                 
                 
                -----Original Message-----
                From: Rik [mailto:commando16h@...]
                Sent: 03 December 2006 20:44
                To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [wdmotorcycles] Re: brown paint

                The inference seems to be that the British use of Olive drab was to
                standardise colour schemes prior to Normandy although the first
                mention of it was in April 1944 which Taylor suggests was rather
                late for Normandy if it was not already in widespread use. Existing
                vehicles were not to be repainted until necessary and all stocks of
                SCC no.2 used up.

                The only exception to the colour change was Bailey Bridge components
                which were kept brown to distinguish them from American parts.

                The brown shade is fairly close to the colour of Battledress so its
                use was perhaps not so strange.

                My 1939 16H was clearly originally finished in Khaki Green no.3,
                including the Lucas components, although the cvc lid has the pre-war
                Service Green underneath. Major components on mine have a brush
                finish splinter camouflage in dark green also (presumably this was
                Dark Green no.4)

                Pigments did vary and certainly after fading, the Olive Drab was
                close to the older KG no.3 It would seem therefore that the only
                obviously wrong scheme would be an early machine
                portraying "Dunkirk" era in brown.

                --- In wdmotorcycles@ yahoogroups. com, "lone gunman" <pvt237@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > when i get on with the repainting its probably going to be in
                brown
                > no2 , with the odd bit of green as not all of it needs re doing,
                the
                > overpainting im going to be careful taking off as i want to see if
                > there are any markings underneath, would be interesting if there
                > were as this would give a clue as to where the bike served, using
                > the original colour scheme is the best way of doing things, was
                > wondering about it with the change, maybe it was the american
                > influence that we went back to using predominantly green,
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In wdmotorcycles@ yahoogroups. com, Jan Jansen <the_axman44@ >
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > I've worked on 3 Royal Enfields Flying Fleas (of 1943) and
                indeed
                > they had still remains of brown paint (2 inside the headlamp)
                Also
                > I know 2 James ML's of 1943 that have still remains of brown
                paint.
                > I've also worked on 3 other Fleas, which had remains of green
                paint
                > and they were from 1944-1945. Also a James ML of 1944 had green
                > paint remains.
                > > I know of a friend who have a Royal Enfield C of 1939/1940,
                that
                > the original paint was green.
                > > Most Welbikes I know of (with original paint) are brown too.
                > Also BSA folding bicycles are in green and brown paint.
                > >
                > > So it would be most likely that during 1939-1941 the normal
                > color was green, later they make it brown and at the end they get
                > back with green paint. (maybe by seeing all those USA vehicles,
                > which were normaly green)
                > >
                > > But true the 1939-1945 years they will have used green ones
                too
                > (all times), in desert they've used sand-yellow color too. Begin
                WW2
                > some vehicle were paint with a kind of Mickey Mouse camouflage. At
                > Malta they used a stone-camouflage. During winter some vehicles
                were
                > painted white. Other kind of camouflage were used too.
                > >
                > > During war also not all pigments were there at some times, so
                > lots of different kind of green, brown, sand-yellow were used.
                Some
                > vehicles were repaint during the war. A few RAF vehicles were
                > painted grey-blue, but most RAF vehicles were just green or brown.
                > >
                > > So when you paint your vehicle green, brown or sand-yellow it
                > will be a very normal used color for your vehicle during WW2. Some
                > people like green more, others brown, I'll leave that up to you
                own
                > choise.
                > >
                > > When I've find old original paint remains on a motorcycle,
                I'll
                > repaint it in that color.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                > > Try the all-new Yahoo! Mail . "The New Version is radically
                > easier to use" - The Wall Street Journal
                > >
                >

              • Rik
                The Matchless certainly looks the part. Well done, that man ! Did you find a large enough sample to match the SCC no.2 or use a mix from a specialist supplier
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 4, 2006
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                  The Matchless certainly looks the part. Well done, that man !

                  Did you find a large enough sample to match the SCC no.2 or use a
                  mix from a specialist supplier ?

                  Rik.





                  --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, p.brown@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails
                  buzzing.
                  > There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this web
                  site which
                  > outlines approximately when the colours changed from a green to
                  brown and
                  > then to Olive Drab.
                  >
                  > As other members have commented although there are dates when new
                  painting
                  > instructions were issued there are no definitive dates as to when
                  individual
                  > manufacturers would have changed as they would have used up
                  available stocks
                  > at the time on whatever contracts they were working on.
                  >
                  > I know my G3L was manufactured mid 1943 which co-incided with the
                  SCC No 2
                  > Service Brown "period" and as there was evidence of brown found on
                  the bike
                  > (although there was probably more green) I chose to repaint it
                  brown. I also
                  > chose to do the same with my James ML (see attached) which is also
                  of 1943
                  > manufacturer and whose tool box was brown inside.
                  >
                  > However to show that I am not entirely brown by name and brown by
                  nature my
                  > 1944 Triumph 3HW is olive drab.
                  >
                  > cheers
                  > Peter(Service) Brown
                • lone gunman
                  paint is not the most exciting of things and can be as dull as watching paint dry, but it is one of the most important aspects of the appearence of a machine,
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 4, 2006
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                    paint is not the most exciting of things and can be as dull as
                    watching paint dry, but it is one of the most important aspects of
                    the appearence of a machine, getting the paint right can make a real
                    difference when you look at a machine, have talked with a few people
                    about olive drab and there were apparently 28 different approved
                    shades of olive drab, from very dark to light green,but brown paint
                    is usully only seen as a secondary camouflage colour, the more i
                    look at it the more i wonder why we dont see more brown vehicles.
                    good question, was it a matched paint or a supplied one, i have been
                    looking at the cost of matching against the cost of buying stock
                    paint and there isnt really any difference in the cost, about £35
                    for 5 litres.im not able to tell whether their no2 matches well with
                    what i have until i have tried it which if it didnt match would be a
                    shame. but a stock paint would save the cost of sending off large
                    bits of metal for matching the paint. what did you do? im tempted to
                    go for the matching even if they receive the part with the sample on
                    it and say the colours what they already have in stock.




                    --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, "Rik" <commando16h@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > The Matchless certainly looks the part. Well done, that man !
                    >
                    > Did you find a large enough sample to match the SCC no.2 or use a
                    > mix from a specialist supplier ?
                    >
                    > Rik.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, p.brown@ wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails
                    > buzzing.
                    > > There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this web
                    > site which
                    > > outlines approximately when the colours changed from a green to
                    > brown and
                    > > then to Olive Drab.
                    > >
                    > > As other members have commented although there are dates when
                    new
                    > painting
                    > > instructions were issued there are no definitive dates as to
                    when
                    > individual
                    > > manufacturers would have changed as they would have used up
                    > available stocks
                    > > at the time on whatever contracts they were working on.
                    > >
                    > > I know my G3L was manufactured mid 1943 which co-incided with
                    the
                    > SCC No 2
                    > > Service Brown "period" and as there was evidence of brown found
                    on
                    > the bike
                    > > (although there was probably more green) I chose to repaint it
                    > brown. I also
                    > > chose to do the same with my James ML (see attached) which is
                    also
                    > of 1943
                    > > manufacturer and whose tool box was brown inside.
                    > >
                    > > However to show that I am not entirely brown by name and brown
                    by
                    > nature my
                    > > 1944 Triumph 3HW is olive drab.
                    > >
                    > > cheers
                    > > Peter(Service) Brown
                    >
                  • p.brown@research-int.com
                    The paint I used was Jeeparts Service Brown. As you know the problem of matching is how original is your sample. Clearly the less daylight and exposure it
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 6, 2006
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                      Message
                      The paint I used was Jeeparts Service Brown.
                       
                      As you know the problem of matching is "how original" is your sample. Clearly the less daylight and exposure it has had will mean that , subject to retaining it's chemical composition, it should be close. Therefore any NOS parts still in their original wrapper or a piece of unexposed frame etc should be fairly indicative, but in the end the final choice is yours.
                      All I tried to achieve was the closest possible based upon the evidence I had and the Jeeparts product fitted the bill.
                       
                      I painted the bike in Feb/March this year so it will be interesting to see in say 2 years time how that colour has weathered.
                       
                      My aim across all the elements of restoration is to try and be as accurate(faithful) as possible. After all we live in a world where we can make such important(?) decisions largely as a result of the sacrifice of those some 65 years ago who used the equipment we are all so passionate about. So let's keep the interest going for them!
                       
                      Therefore I guess watching paint dry is not so bad after all
                       
                       
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: lone gunman [mailto:pvt237@...]
                      Sent: 05 December 2006 00:13
                      To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [wdmotorcycles] Re: brown paint

                      paint is not the most exciting of things and can be as dull as
                      watching paint dry, but it is one of the most important aspects of
                      the appearence of a machine, getting the paint right can make a real
                      difference when you look at a machine, have talked with a few people
                      about olive drab and there were apparently 28 different approved
                      shades of olive drab, from very dark to light green,but brown paint
                      is usully only seen as a secondary camouflage colour, the more i
                      look at it the more i wonder why we dont see more brown vehicles.
                      good question, was it a matched paint or a supplied one, i have been
                      looking at the cost of matching against the cost of buying stock
                      paint and there isnt really any difference in the cost, about £35
                      for 5 litres.im not able to tell whether their no2 matches well with
                      what i have until i have tried it which if it didnt match would be a
                      shame. but a stock paint would save the cost of sending off large
                      bits of metal for matching the paint. what did you do? im tempted to
                      go for the matching even if they receive the part with the sample on
                      it and say the colours what they already have in stock.

                      --- In wdmotorcycles@ yahoogroups. com, "Rik" <commando16h@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > The Matchless certainly looks the part. Well done, that man !
                      >
                      > Did you find a large enough sample to match the SCC no.2 or use a
                      > mix from a specialist supplier ?
                      >
                      > Rik.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In wdmotorcycles@ yahoogroups. com, p.brown@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails
                      > buzzing.
                      > > There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this web
                      > site which
                      > > outlines approximately when the colours changed from a green to
                      > brown and
                      > > then to Olive Drab.
                      > >
                      > > As other members have commented although there are dates when
                      new
                      > painting
                      > > instructions were issued there are no definitive dates as to
                      when
                      > individual
                      > > manufacturers would have changed as they would have used up
                      > available stocks
                      > > at the time on whatever contracts they were working on.
                      > >
                      > > I know my G3L was manufactured mid 1943 which co-incided with
                      the
                      > SCC No 2
                      > > Service Brown "period" and as there was evidence of brown found
                      on
                      > the bike
                      > > (although there was probably more green) I chose to repaint it
                      > brown. I also
                      > > chose to do the same with my James ML (see attached) which is
                      also
                      > of 1943
                      > > manufacturer and whose tool box was brown inside.
                      > >
                      > > However to show that I am not entirely brown by name and brown
                      by
                      > nature my
                      > > 1944 Triumph 3HW is olive drab.
                      > >
                      > > cheers
                      > > Peter(Service) Brown
                      >

                    • Rik
                      Thanks for your reply Peter, I shall give Jeeparts a try. My 16H has plenty of factory finish on the cycle parts, including inside the headlamp and behind the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 6, 2006
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                        Thanks for your reply Peter, I shall give Jeeparts a try.

                        My 16H has plenty of factory finish on the cycle parts, including
                        inside the headlamp and behind the brake plates. The colour looks
                        fresh and "right" to me. I have however had conflicting advice about
                        how large a flat area is needed for modern paint matching schemes.
                        If I can expect a poor match then I am perhaps better off with a
                        known colour from a respected supplier.

                        What sort of paint did you use ? Is it a semi-gloss synthetic
                        enamel ?

                        I see that your restorations are based on high ideals. I'm sorry to
                        say that my aims are probably just a result of having an obsessive
                        personality that causes me to become annoyed with small detail
                        faults !

                        Rik-the-rivet-counter.





                        --- In wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com, p.brown@... wrote:
                        >
                        > The paint I used was Jeeparts Service Brown.
                        >
                        > As you know the problem of matching is "how original" is your
                        sample.
                        > Clearly the less daylight and exposure it has had will mean that ,
                        subject
                        > to retaining it's chemical composition, it should be close.
                        Therefore any
                        > NOS parts still in their original wrapper or a piece of unexposed
                        frame etc
                        > should be fairly indicative, but in the end the final choice is
                        yours.
                        > All I tried to achieve was the closest possible based upon the
                        evidence I
                        > had and the Jeeparts product fitted the bill.
                        >
                        > I painted the bike in Feb/March this year so it will be
                        interesting to see
                        > in say 2 years time how that colour has weathered.
                        >
                        > My aim across all the elements of restoration is to try and be as
                        > accurate(faithful) as possible. After all we live in a world where
                        we can
                        > make such important(?) decisions largely as a result of the
                        sacrifice of
                        > those some 65 years ago who used the equipment we are all so
                        passionate
                        > about. So let's keep the interest going for them!
                        >
                        > Therefore I guess watching paint dry is not so bad after all
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: lone gunman [mailto:pvt237@...]
                        > Sent: 05 December 2006 00:13
                        > To: wdmotorcycles@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: [wdmotorcycles] Re: brown paint
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > paint is not the most exciting of things and can be as dull as
                        > watching paint dry, but it is one of the most important aspects of
                        > the appearence of a machine, getting the paint right can make a
                        real
                        > difference when you look at a machine, have talked with a few
                        people
                        > about olive drab and there were apparently 28 different approved
                        > shades of olive drab, from very dark to light green,but brown
                        paint
                        > is usully only seen as a secondary camouflage colour, the more i
                        > look at it the more i wonder why we dont see more brown vehicles.
                        > good question, was it a matched paint or a supplied one, i have
                        been
                        > looking at the cost of matching against the cost of buying stock
                        > paint and there isnt really any difference in the cost, about £35
                        > for 5 litres.im not able to tell whether their no2 matches well
                        with
                        > what i have until i have tried it which if it didnt match would be
                        a
                        > shame. but a stock paint would save the cost of sending off large
                        > bits of metal for matching the paint. what did you do? im tempted
                        to
                        > go for the matching even if they receive the part with the sample
                        on
                        > it and say the colours what they already have in stock.
                        >
                        > --- In wdmotorcycles@ <mailto:wdmotorcycles%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > yahoogroups.com, "Rik" <commando16h@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > The Matchless certainly looks the part. Well done, that man !
                        > >
                        > > Did you find a large enough sample to match the SCC no.2 or use
                        a
                        > > mix from a specialist supplier ?
                        > >
                        > > Rik.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In wdmotorcycles@ <mailto:wdmotorcycles%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > yahoogroups.com, p.brown@ wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Glad to see the picture of my G3L in Windscreen got the emails
                        > > buzzing.
                        > > > There is a colour chart posted in the photos section of this
                        web
                        > > site which
                        > > > outlines approximately when the colours changed from a green
                        to
                        > > brown and
                        > > > then to Olive Drab.
                        > > >
                        > > > As other members have commented although there are dates when
                        > new
                        > > painting
                        > > > instructions were issued there are no definitive dates as to
                        > when
                        > > individual
                        > > > manufacturers would have changed as they would have used up
                        > > available stocks
                        > > > at the time on whatever contracts they were working on.
                        > > >
                        > > > I know my G3L was manufactured mid 1943 which co-incided with
                        > the
                        > > SCC No 2
                        > > > Service Brown "period" and as there was evidence of brown
                        found
                        > on
                        > > the bike
                        > > > (although there was probably more green) I chose to repaint it
                        > > brown. I also
                        > > > chose to do the same with my James ML (see attached) which is
                        > also
                        > > of 1943
                        > > > manufacturer and whose tool box was brown inside.
                        > > >
                        > > > However to show that I am not entirely brown by name and brown
                        > by
                        > > nature my
                        > > > 1944 Triumph 3HW is olive drab.
                        > > >
                        > > > cheers
                        > > > Peter(Service) Brown
                        > >
                        >
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