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  • Richie
    Sisters and brothers, I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs! After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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      Sisters and brothers,

      I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

      After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

      Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

      After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

      Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

      Brew Free,

      Richie

      On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
      In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
      On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen

    • Jonathan Moxey
      Why isn t the carboy in your hotel room with you? ... -- Jonathan Moxey jonathan.moxey@gmail.com
      Message 2 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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        Why isn't the carboy in your hotel room with you?

        On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
         

        Sisters and brothers,

        I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

        After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

        Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

        After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

        Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

        Brew Free,

        Richie

        On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
        In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
        On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen




        --
        Jonathan Moxey
        jonathan.moxey@...

      • Noah Pearce
        Do you have power back? Do you want to put in in my fermentation chamber? I have a Belgian in there now if yours doesn t kick back in I can pull off some
        Message 3 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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          Do you have power back?  Do you want to put in in my fermentation chamber?  I have a Belgian in there now if yours doesn't kick back in I can pull off some active yeast and try to kick start it...

          On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
           

          Sisters and brothers,

          I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

          After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

          Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

          After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

          Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

          Brew Free,

          Richie

          On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
          In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
          On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


        • Brian Fannin
          This won t help you at all, but I m curious how one identifies something as being fully aerated . Don t get me wrong, I m all for it. I throw in the aquarium
          Message 4 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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            This won't help you at all, but I'm curious how one identifies something as being "fully aerated". Don't get me wrong, I'm all for it. I throw in the aquarium stone, produce lots of bubbles and hope for the best.

            From: Richie <radepalma@...>
            To: "nychg@yahoogroups.com" <nychg@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: "wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com" <wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:11 PM
            Subject: [wchomebrew] help, please

             
            Sisters and brothers,

            I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

            After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

            Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

            After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

            Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

            Brew Free,

            Richie

            On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
            In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
            On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen



          • Noah Pearce
            Hit it w/ pure O2 for about a minute and if you have a flow meter then you could do math...
            Message 5 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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              Hit it w/ pure O2 for about a minute and if you have a flow meter then you could do math...

              On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:22 PM, Brian Fannin <FanninQED@...> wrote:
               

              This won't help you at all, but I'm curious how one identifies something as being "fully aerated". Don't get me wrong, I'm all for it. I throw in the aquarium stone, produce lots of bubbles and hope for the best.

              From: Richie <radepalma@...>
              To: "nychg@yahoogroups.com" <nychg@yahoogroups.com>
              Cc: "wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com" <wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:11 PM
              Subject: [wchomebrew] help, please

               
              Sisters and brothers,

              I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

              After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

              Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

              After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

              Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

              Brew Free,

              Richie

              On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
              In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
              On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen




            • Matthew Friefeld
              Richie, Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you re back home again
              Message 6 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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                Richie,

                Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and might the entire batch might be very salvageable.  When you're back home again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter, take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter and see if fermentation resumes?
                How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and the temp fell?  Any idea what the current gravity is?
                Hope you get power back soon.  

                Matt

                On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                 

                Sisters and brothers,

                I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

                After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

                Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

                After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

                Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

                Brew Free,

                Richie

                On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


              • dja80@msn.com
                I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what happens.
                Message 7 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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                  I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what happens. Damn storm

                  Dan


                  -----Original message-----
                  From: Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>
                  To:
                  nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent:
                  Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00
                  Subject:
                  [wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please

                   

                  Richie,


                  Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and might the entire batch might be very salvageable.  When you're back home again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter, take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter and see if fermentation resumes?
                  How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and the temp fell?  Any idea what the current gravity is?
                  Hope you get power back soon.  

                  Matt

                  On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                   

                  Sisters and brothers,

                  I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

                  After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

                  Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

                  After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

                  Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

                  Brew Free,

                  Richie

                  On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                  In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                  On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                • Matthew Friefeld
                  Richie, On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if possible
                  Message 8 of 17 , Nov 1, 2011
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                    Richie,

                    On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily complicated.  If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is restored and you can attend to it) do the following:

                    Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                    Take a gravity reading
                    Rouse the yeast.  You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert  it down into the fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds.  You might wish to plug the opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the wort.
                    See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.

                    Good Luck,
                    Matt

                    On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                     

                    I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what happens. Damn storm

                    Dan


                    -----Original message-----
                    From: Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>
                    To:
                    nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent:
                    Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00
                    Subject:
                    [wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please

                     

                    Richie,


                    Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and might the entire batch might be very salvageable.  When you're back home again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter, take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter and see if fermentation resumes?
                    How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and the temp fell?  Any idea what the current gravity is?
                    Hope you get power back soon.  

                    Matt

                    On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                     

                    Sisters and brothers,

                    I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!

                    After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew session.  1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.  Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.

                    Then, Saturday, we lost power.  No heat, no water.  Cold.  Still out.

                    After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees.  I have not taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure it is nowhere near done.  

                    Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?

                    Brew Free,

                    Richie

                    On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                    In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                    On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen



                  • vlad.kowalyk
                    I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of
                    Message 9 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
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                      I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                      I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                      I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                      Cheers,
                      Vlad

                      --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Richie,
                      >
                      > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                      > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                      > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                      > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                      >
                      > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                      > Take a gravity reading
                      > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                      > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                      > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                      > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                      > wort.
                      > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                      >
                      > Good Luck,
                      > Matt
                      >
                      > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > **
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                      > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                      > > happens. Damn storm
                      > >
                      > > Dan
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > -----Original message-----
                      > >
                      > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                      > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                      > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                      > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Richie,
                      > >
                      > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                      > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                      > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                      > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                      > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                      > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                      > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                      > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                      > > Hope you get power back soon.
                      > >
                      > > Matt
                      > >
                      > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >> **
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >> Sisters and brothers,
                      > >>
                      > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                      > >>
                      > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                      > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                      > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                      > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                      > >>
                      > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                      > >>
                      > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                      > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                      > >> it is nowhere near done.
                      > >>
                      > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                      > >>
                      > >> Brew Free,
                      > >>
                      > >> Richie
                      > >>
                      > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                      > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                      > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Lee Jacobson
                      +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch
                      Message 10 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
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                        +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                        On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                         

                        I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                        I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                        I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                        Cheers,
                        Vlad

                        --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Richie,
                        >
                        > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                        > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                        > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                        > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                        >
                        > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                        > Take a gravity reading
                        > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                        > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                        > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                        > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                        > wort.
                        > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                        >
                        > Good Luck,
                        > Matt
                        >
                        > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > **
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                        > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                        > > happens. Damn storm
                        > >
                        > > Dan
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > -----Original message-----
                        > >
                        > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                        > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                        > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                        > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Richie,
                        > >
                        > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                        > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                        > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                        > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                        > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                        > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                        > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                        > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                        > > Hope you get power back soon.
                        > >
                        > > Matt
                        > >
                        > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> **
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> Sisters and brothers,
                        > >>
                        > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                        > >>
                        > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                        > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                        > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                        > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                        > >>
                        > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                        > >>
                        > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                        > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                        > >> it is nowhere near done.
                        > >>
                        > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                        > >>
                        > >> Brew Free,
                        > >>
                        > >> Richie
                        > >>
                        > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                        > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                        > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >
                        >

                      • Richie
                        Thanks all It wasn t in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got
                        Message 11 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
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                          Thanks all

                          It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                          I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                          It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                          We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!

                          Brew Free,

                          Richie

                          On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                          In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                          On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                          On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                           

                          +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                          On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                           

                          I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                          I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                          I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                          Cheers,
                          Vlad

                          --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Richie,
                          >
                          > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                          > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                          > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                          > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                          >
                          > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                          > Take a gravity reading
                          > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                          > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                          > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                          > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                          > wort.
                          > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                          >
                          > Good Luck,
                          > Matt
                          >
                          > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > **
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                          > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                          > > happens. Damn storm
                          > >
                          > > Dan
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > -----Original message-----
                          > >
                          > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                          > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                          > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                          > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Richie,
                          > >
                          > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                          > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                          > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                          > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                          > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                          > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                          > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                          > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                          > > Hope you get power back soon.
                          > >
                          > > Matt
                          > >
                          > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >> **
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> Sisters and brothers,
                          > >>
                          > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                          > >>
                          > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                          > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                          > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                          > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                          > >>
                          > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                          > >>
                          > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                          > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                          > >> it is nowhere near done.
                          > >>
                          > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                          > >>
                          > >> Brew Free,
                          > >>
                          > >> Richie
                          > >>
                          > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                          > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                          > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          >

                        • Lee Jacobson
                          Id use an attenuative yeast. Belgian ale yeasts are typically pretty attenuative so I don t think you would usu go wrong with them, but depends on which yeast
                          Message 12 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment

                            Id use an attenuative yeast. Belgian ale yeasts are typically pretty attenuative so I don't think you would usu go wrong with them, but depends on which yeast you were using.

                            On Nov 2, 2011 9:34 AM, "Richie" <radepalma@...> wrote:
                             

                            Thanks all

                            It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                            I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                            It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                            We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!

                            Brew Free,

                            Richie

                            On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                            In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                            On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                            On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                             

                            +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                            On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                             

                            I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                            I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                            I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                            Cheers,
                            Vlad

                            --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Richie,
                            >
                            > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                            > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                            > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                            > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                            >
                            > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                            > Take a gravity reading
                            > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                            > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                            > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                            > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                            > wort.
                            > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                            >
                            > Good Luck,
                            > Matt
                            >
                            > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > **
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                            > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                            > > happens. Damn storm
                            > >
                            > > Dan
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > -----Original message-----
                            > >
                            > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                            > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                            > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                            > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Richie,
                            > >
                            > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                            > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                            > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                            > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                            > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                            > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                            > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                            > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                            > > Hope you get power back soon.
                            > >
                            > > Matt
                            > >
                            > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >> **
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> Sisters and brothers,
                            > >>
                            > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                            > >>
                            > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                            > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                            > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                            > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                            > >>
                            > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                            > >>
                            > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                            > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                            > >> it is nowhere near done.
                            > >>
                            > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                            > >>
                            > >> Brew Free,
                            > >>
                            > >> Richie
                            > >>
                            > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                            > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                            > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >
                            >

                          • Jonathan Bilodeau
                            Too bad you weren’t making a lager….. Good luck and please let everyone know how things turn out. Jonathan Bilodeau | Director, Security | Univision
                            Message 13 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment

                              Too bad you weren’t making a lager…..

                               

                              Good luck and please let everyone know how things turn out.

                               

                               

                              Jonathan Bilodeau  |  Director, Security  |  Univision Communications Inc.  |  605 Third Avenue, 26th Floor, New York, NY 10158
                              Direct: 646-487-6549  |  jbilodeau@...  |  http://www.univision.com


                              From: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richie
                              Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2011 9:34 AM
                              To: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
                              Cc: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please

                               

                               

                              Thanks all

                               

                              It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                               

                              I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                               

                              It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                               

                              We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!

                              Brew Free,

                               

                              Richie

                               

                              On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale

                              In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison

                              On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefew eizen

                               


                              On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                               

                              +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                              On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:

                               

                              I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                              I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                              I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                              Cheers,
                              Vlad

                              --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Richie,
                              >
                              > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                              > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                              > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                              > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                              >
                              > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                              > Take a gravity reading
                              > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                              > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                              > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                              > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                              > wort.
                              > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                              >
                              > Good Luck,
                              > Matt
                              >
                              > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > **
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                              > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                              > > happens. Damn storm
                              > >
                              > > Dan
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > -----Original message-----
                              > >
                              > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                              > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                              > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                              > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Richie,
                              > >
                              > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                              > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                              > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                              > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                              > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                              > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                              > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                              > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                              > > Hope you get power back soon.
                              > >
                              > > Matt
                              > >
                              > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > >> **
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> Sisters and brothers,
                              > >>
                              > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                              > >>
                              > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                              > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                              > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                              > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                              > >>
                              > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                              > >>
                              > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                              > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                              > >> it is nowhere near done.
                              > >>
                              > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                              > >>
                              > >> Brew Free,
                              > >>
                              > >> Richie
                              > >>
                              > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                              > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                              > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >
                              > >
                              >

                              The information contained in this e-mail and any attached documents may be privileged, confidential and protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient you may not read, copy, distribute or use this information. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this message and then delete it from your system.
                            • Jonathan Moxey
                              Why wasn t the carboy in Cleveland? ... -- Jonathan Moxey jonathan.moxey@gmail.com
                              Message 14 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Why wasn't the carboy in Cleveland?

                                On Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 9:34 AM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                 

                                Thanks all

                                It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                                I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                                It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                                We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!


                                Brew Free,

                                Richie

                                On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                                 

                                +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                                On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                                 

                                I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                                I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                                I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                                Cheers,
                                Vlad

                                --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Richie,
                                >
                                > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                                > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                                > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                                > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                                >
                                > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                                > Take a gravity reading
                                > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                                > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                                > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                                > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                                > wort.
                                > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                                >
                                > Good Luck,
                                > Matt
                                >
                                > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > > **
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                                > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                                > > happens. Damn storm
                                > >
                                > > Dan
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > -----Original message-----
                                > >
                                > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                                > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                                > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                                > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Richie,
                                > >
                                > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                                > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                                > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                                > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                                > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                                > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                                > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                                > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                                > > Hope you get power back soon.
                                > >
                                > > Matt
                                > >
                                > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >> **
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> Sisters and brothers,
                                > >>
                                > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                                > >>
                                > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                                > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                                > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                                > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                                > >>
                                > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                                > >>
                                > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                                > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                                > >> it is nowhere near done.
                                > >>
                                > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                                > >>
                                > >> Brew Free,
                                > >>
                                > >> Richie
                                > >>
                                > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >
                                > >
                                >




                                --
                                Jonathan Moxey
                                jonathan.moxey@...

                              • Noah Pearce
                                If I was in this situation I d check where the gravity to see how far a long it was, as you plan to do. If its any less then 1/3 of the way to FG then I d want
                                Message 15 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  If I was in this situation I'd check where the gravity to see how far a long it was, as you plan to do. If its any less then 1/3 of the way to FG then I'd want to stay with the same yeast. I'd do a closed Co2 transfer and rack up some of the yeast cake with a racking cane on to some starter wort (because I'm cheep) and put in on the stir plate get it ripping along and pitch that. If you have more of the Abbey ale yeast or can easily get some and make a starter then then that might be easier.

                                  If it further along then any neutral ale yeast with a high alcohol toleration will do, just make it a big starter and pitch at high krausen.
                                   

                                  On Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 9:50 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  Id use an attenuative yeast. Belgian ale yeasts are typically pretty attenuative so I don't think you would usu go wrong with them, but depends on which yeast you were using.

                                  On Nov 2, 2011 9:34 AM, "Richie" <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  Thanks all

                                  It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                                  I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                                  It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                                  We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!

                                  Brew Free,

                                  Richie

                                  On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                  In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                  On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                  On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                                  On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                                  I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                                  I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                                  Cheers,
                                  Vlad

                                  --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Richie,
                                  >
                                  > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                                  > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                                  > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                                  > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                                  >
                                  > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                                  > Take a gravity reading
                                  > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                                  > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                                  > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                                  > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                                  > wort.
                                  > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                                  >
                                  > Good Luck,
                                  > Matt
                                  >
                                  > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > **
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                                  > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                                  > > happens. Damn storm
                                  > >
                                  > > Dan
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > -----Original message-----
                                  > >
                                  > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                                  > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                                  > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                                  > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > Richie,
                                  > >
                                  > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                                  > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                                  > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                                  > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                                  > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                                  > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                                  > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                                  > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                                  > > Hope you get power back soon.
                                  > >
                                  > > Matt
                                  > >
                                  > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > >> **
                                  > >>
                                  > >>
                                  > >> Sisters and brothers,
                                  > >>
                                  > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                                  > >>
                                  > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                                  > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                                  > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                                  > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                                  > >>
                                  > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                                  > >>
                                  > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                                  > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                                  > >> it is nowhere near done.
                                  > >>
                                  > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                                  > >>
                                  > >> Brew Free,
                                  > >>
                                  > >> Richie
                                  > >>
                                  > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                  > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                  > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                                  > >>
                                  > >>
                                  > >>
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >


                                • Richie
                                  It should have been. Brew Free, Richie On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison On deck: Robust Porter,
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Nov 2, 2011
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    It should have been.  

                                    Brew Free,

                                    Richie

                                    On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                    In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                    On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                    On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:57 AM, Jonathan Moxey <jonathan.moxey@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    Why wasn't the carboy in Cleveland?

                                    On Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 9:34 AM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Thanks all

                                    It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                                    I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                                    It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                                    We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!


                                    Brew Free,

                                    Richie

                                    On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                    In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                    On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                    On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                                    On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                                    I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                                    I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                                    Cheers,
                                    Vlad

                                    --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Richie,
                                    >
                                    > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                                    > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                                    > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                                    > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                                    >
                                    > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                                    > Take a gravity reading
                                    > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                                    > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                                    > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                                    > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                                    > wort.
                                    > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                                    >
                                    > Good Luck,
                                    > Matt
                                    >
                                    > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > > **
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                                    > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                                    > > happens. Damn storm
                                    > >
                                    > > Dan
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > -----Original message-----
                                    > >
                                    > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                                    > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                                    > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                                    > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Richie,
                                    > >
                                    > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                                    > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                                    > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                                    > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                                    > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                                    > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                                    > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                                    > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                                    > > Hope you get power back soon.
                                    > >
                                    > > Matt
                                    > >
                                    > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >> **
                                    > >>
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Sisters and brothers,
                                    > >>
                                    > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                                    > >>
                                    > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                                    > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                                    > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                                    > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                                    > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                                    > >> it is nowhere near done.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Brew Free,
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Richie
                                    > >>
                                    > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                    > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                    > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                                    > >>
                                    > >>
                                    > >>
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >




                                    --
                                    Jonathan Moxey
                                    jonathan.moxey@...

                                  • Richie
                                    Thanks to all. I will certainly let you all know what happens. Got electricity back last night. Brew Free, Richie On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Nov 3, 2011
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Thanks to all.  I will certainly let you all know what happens. Got electricity back last night. 

                                      Brew Free,

                                      Richie

                                      On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                      In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                      On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                      On Nov 2, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Noah Pearce <noah.m.pearce@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      If I was in this situation I'd check where the gravity to see how far a long it was, as you plan to do. If its any less then 1/3 of the way to FG then I'd want to stay with the same yeast. I'd do a closed Co2 transfer and rack up some of the yeast cake with a racking cane on to some starter wort (because I'm cheep) and put in on the stir plate get it ripping along and pitch that. If you have more of the Abbey ale yeast or can easily get some and make a starter then then that might be easier.


                                      If it further along then any neutral ale yeast with a high alcohol toleration will do, just make it a big starter and pitch at high krausen.
                                       

                                      On Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 9:50 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Id use an attenuative yeast. Belgian ale yeasts are typically pretty attenuative so I don't think you would usu go wrong with them, but depends on which yeast you were using.

                                      On Nov 2, 2011 9:34 AM, "Richie" <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Thanks all

                                      It wasn't in my hotel room with me because I was stuck in Cleveland with the airports closed. It was already crashed for three days before I got home.  I am ordering a generator today, believe me.

                                      I guess the best thing is to wait for electricity, warm it up and pitch a shit load (technical term) of high krausen wort and see what happens. 

                                      It was at 68 for 6 days before the crash.  I'll take a reading, but assuming I am about half way there, should I use the same yeast (white labs abbey) or a cal ale?

                                      We are still without electricity as of today, and could not find a hotel last night.  This sucks!

                                      Brew Free,

                                      Richie

                                      On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                      In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                      On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen


                                      On Nov 2, 2011, at 9:18 AM, Lee Jacobson <lee.jacobson@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      +1. What you can do is make a starter and oxygenate the starter, and then allow it to reach high krausen before pitching. Its generally a good idea to pitch yeast at high krausen when trying to restart fermentation as depleted sugar and higher alcohol in partially fermented beer suppress yeast activity. If they're not active whe pitched they might not fully activate.

                                      On Nov 2, 2011 8:18 AM, "vlad.kowalyk" <vladthebeerman@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      I would not under any circumstances introduce a paddle stirrer after active fermentation has started. Regardless of the circumstances. I think the risk of introducing oxygen is too great and not worth the cost to benefit ratio if your goal is to rouse the yeast.

                                      I would also consider raising the temp higher than 68. Maybe as high as 78 degrees + depending on yeast strain. I think you are far enough into fermentation that ester production will be minimal and possibly very welcome in a Dark Strong.

                                      I hope you get power back soon and that this turns out to be your best batch of beer EVER!! And I hope that everyone else survived the storm as well as can be expected.

                                      Cheers,
                                      Vlad

                                      --- In wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Richie,
                                      >
                                      > On further reflection, maybe my earlier suggestion was unnecessarily
                                      > complicated. If the temp has been relatively low the whole time (and if
                                      > possible move the carboy to a spot where it will stay low until power is
                                      > restored and you can attend to it) do the following:
                                      >
                                      > Bring the wort back up to 68 F
                                      > Take a gravity reading
                                      > Rouse the yeast. You can use Ken's method: Attach a sanitized paint
                                      > stirrer or winemaker's degassing paddle to drill, insert it down into the
                                      > fermenter and run it gently for a few seconds. You might wish to plug the
                                      > opening with some plastic wrap to minimize introducing any oxygen into the
                                      > wort.
                                      > See if it comes back to life in 24 hours or so.
                                      >
                                      > Good Luck,
                                      > Matt
                                      >
                                      > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:48 PM, dja80@... <dja80@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > **
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > I feel your pain. Had the same problem. Had two batches going. I got power
                                      > > back today. I transfered to another fermenter and re pitched. Will see what
                                      > > happens. Damn storm
                                      > >
                                      > > Dan
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > -----Original message-----
                                      > >
                                      > > *From: *Matthew Friefeld <mfriefeld@...>*
                                      > > To: *nychg@yahoogroups.com, wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com*
                                      > > Sent: *Tue, Nov 1, 2011 21:38:31 GMT+00:00*
                                      > > Subject: *[wchomebrew] Re: [nychg] help, please
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Richie,
                                      > >
                                      > > Actually, at 35 degrees your yeast has most certainly crashed early and
                                      > > might the entire batch might be very salvageable. When you're back home
                                      > > again and the power is restored, why not rack off to another fermenter,
                                      > > take the yeast cake, rinse it, then bring it up to temp and pitch to a
                                      > > starter to revive it, then bring the wort up to 68, pitch the "new" starter
                                      > > and see if fermentation resumes?
                                      > > How long was the fermentation at full kreusen when the power failed and
                                      > > the temp fell? Any idea what the current gravity is?
                                      > > Hope you get power back soon.
                                      > >
                                      > > Matt
                                      > >
                                      > > On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:11 PM, Richie <radepalma@...> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > >> **
                                      > >>
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Sisters and brothers,
                                      > >>
                                      > >> I am sure that I am jinxed when it comes to Belgian Dark Strongs!
                                      > >>
                                      > >> After two previous disasters, one of which resulted in a temper tantrum
                                      > >> and the sewer pour of an entire wort, I finally nailed a Dark Strong brew
                                      > >> session. 1.110, beautiful color, fully aerated and large yeast slurry.
                                      > >> Fermentation started right on, and sailing at 68 degrees.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Then, Saturday, we lost power. No heat, no water. Cold. Still out.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> After only 6 days, Le Dark Strong dropped to 35 degrees. I have not
                                      > >> taken a gravity reading yet (we are living out of an hotel), but I am sure
                                      > >> it is nowhere near done.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Any suggestions on a way to try and save the ferment?
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Brew Free,
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Richie
                                      > >>
                                      > >> On tap: Bohemian Pilsner, Honey Blonde Ale
                                      > >> In the fermenter: Belgian Dark Strong, Special Saison
                                      > >> On deck: Robust Porter, American IPA, Hefeweizen
                                      > >>
                                      > >>
                                      > >>
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >


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