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Wort Chillers

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  • Kevin Winn
    I brewed yesterday, making a 10 gallon split batch (half rye ale, half biere de garde). I got towards the end of the boil and was getting my immersion wort
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2009
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      I brewed yesterday, making a 10 gallon split batch (half rye ale, half biere de garde). I got towards the end of the boil and was getting my immersion wort chiller ready to drop in, when I noticed it had frozen and split in two places. I must not have done a good job of draining it last time. It was a 50’ length of copper, but after I cut it down yesterday to remove the holes and chill the wort, it is about 30’. Worked alright for winter water temperature, but I think it would take a long time to work when the water source is warmer. So, I can either make a new immersion chiller,  get some compression fittings and put the old one back together, or buy a counterflow chiller. I’m leaning towards putting the old one back together, but figured I’d do some investigation first.

       

      Anyone have experience with a counterflow chiller? Downsides I have heard about are sanitization/cleaning, obtaining consistent wort temperature with varying cold water temperature, and potential for plugging with hop debris. If you have one and like it, what make is it?

       

      Thanks,

      Kevin

    • michael katz
      Great idea. Mike K. _____ From: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of hetken Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2009 5:35 PM
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2009
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        Great idea.

         

        Mike K.

         


        From: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com [mailto: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of hetken
        Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2009 5:35 PM
        To: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SPAM][wchomebrew] Saturday Lambic at Capt L's

         

        Today was a work day. It is another thing brewing 150 gallons and not
        5 gallons. 4 of us club members were joined by two others Rich from
        CptL and John from CT. The only thing bad is we will have to wait two
        years to sample out efforts. But the beer, pizza and conversation was
        super.
        Ken

      • Jonathan Bilodeau
        50 of copper is a lot - even 30 should be adequate depending on the flow rate of your water. I have about 15 (3/8 OD copper tube) which allows me to
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2009
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          50' of copper is a lot - even 30' should be adequate depending on the flow rate of your water.    I have about 15'  (3/8 OD copper tube) which allows me to bring a 5 gal pot at boil to pitching temp in about 15 minutes, but I use a fast stream of cold water passing thru.
           
          There is a cool calculator that you can play "what if" with.  It's made for another hobby, but the math should be the same.
           
           
          You should also be able to cut out the old tubing and solder it back together.  Compression fittings might work as well but are more expensive and prone to eventual failure.
           

          From: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Winn
          Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:18 PM
          To: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [wchomebrew] Wort Chillers

          I brewed yesterday, making a 10 gallon split batch (half rye ale, half biere de garde). I got towards the end of the boil and was getting my immersion wort chiller ready to drop in, when I noticed it had frozen and split in two places. I must not have done a good job of draining it last time. It was a 50’ length of copper, but after I cut it down yesterday to remove the holes and chill the wort, it is about 30’. Worked alright for winter water temperature, but I think it would take a long time to work when the water source is warmer. So, I can either make a new immersion chiller,  get some compression fittings and put the old one back together, or buy a counterflow chiller. I’m leaning towards putting the old one back together, but figured I’d do some investigation first.

          Anyone have experience with a counterflow chiller? Downsides I have heard about are sanitization/ cleaning, obtaining consistent wort temperature with varying cold water temperature, and potential for plugging with hop debris. If you have one and like it, what make is it?

          Thanks,

          Kevin

        • Phil
          You don t need the water flowing too quickly to efficiently cool the batch down.  If the water leaving the leaving output tubing is cold, cut back on the
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 2, 2009
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            You don't need the water flowing too quickly to efficiently cool the batch down.  If the water leaving the leaving output tubing is cold, cut back on the water.
             
            Occasionally stiring the batch with the chiller also helps.
             
             
            Phil

            --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Jonathan Bilodeau <jbilodeau@...> wrote:

            From: Jonathan Bilodeau <jbilodeau@...>
            Subject: RE: [wchomebrew] Wort Chillers
            To: wchomebrew@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 11:38 AM

            50' of copper is a lot - even 30' should be adequate depending on the flow rate of your water.    I have about 15'  (3/8 OD copper tube) which allows me to bring a 5 gal pot at boil to pitching temp in about 15 minutes, but I use a fast stream of cold water passing thru.
             
            There is a cool calculator that you can play "what if" with.  It's made for another hobby, but the math should be the same.
             
             
            You should also be able to cut out the old tubing and solder it back together.  Compression fittings might work as well but are more expensive and prone to eventual failure.
             

            From: wchomebrew@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:wchomebrew@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kevin Winn
            Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:18 PM
            To: wchomebrew@yahoogro ups.com
            Subject: [wchomebrew] Wort Chillers

            I brewed yesterday, making a 10 gallon split batch (half rye ale, half biere de garde). I got towards the end of the boil and was getting my immersion wort chiller ready to drop in, when I noticed it had frozen and split in two places. I must not have done a good job of draining it last time. It was a 50’ length of copper, but after I cut it down yesterday to remove the holes and chill the wort, it is about 30’. Worked alright for winter water temperature, but I think it would take a long time to work when the water source is warmer. So, I can either make a new immersion chiller,  get some compression fittings and put the old one back together, or buy a counterflow chiller. I’m leaning towards putting the old one back together, but figured I’d do some investigation first.

            Anyone have experience with a counterflow chiller? Downsides I have heard about are sanitization/ cleaning, obtaining consistent wort temperature with varying cold water temperature, and potential for plugging with hop debris. If you have one and like it, what make is it?

            Thanks,

            Kevin


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