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security cameras in school

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  • Todd Groves
    A teacher described her desire to monitor her unruly classroom with a camera, but was told by an administrator that surveillance violates privacy laws. This
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 2, 2008
      A teacher described her desire to monitor her unruly classroom with a
      camera, but was told by an administrator that surveillance violates
      privacy laws. This seems a misinterpretation. Does anyone have
      definitive knowledge supporting either side?

      Todd Groves
    • imcookielady
      Todd: I moved to NC in 2005. They have cameras in the schools here. The only place they don t have them is in the locker rooms and the restrooms. They are
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 2, 2008
        Todd:
        I moved to NC in 2005. They have cameras in the schools here. The
        only place they don't have them is in the locker rooms and the
        restrooms. They are in the classrooms, hallways and monitor around the
        outside of the school. This is how they caught a couple of kids who
        tagged the school as well as fights. I don't know about CA laws but
        there may/may not be a federal law that allows it. I know that the
        privacy laws for a student do not apply when it comes to searching
        their lockers, so I am wondering how an obvious camera can violate the
        same privacy laws. The principal at our school told me that it not
        only helps catch fights and other problems, but also prevents them. My
        kids have never felt safer in school.

        Jennifer Felix

        --- In wccusdtalk@yahoogroups.com, "Todd Groves" <tag1022@...> wrote:
        >
        > A teacher described her desire to monitor her unruly classroom with a
        > camera, but was told by an administrator that surveillance violates
        > privacy laws. This seems a misinterpretation. Does anyone have
        > definitive knowledge supporting either side?
        >
        > Todd Groves
        >
      • Kevin Rivard
        Todd, This would be my suggestion. The teacher should get a log book of some type. Every infraction that happens in her classroom she would document. Date,
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2008
          Todd,

          This would be my suggestion.

          The teacher should get a log book of some type. Every infraction that happens in her classroom she would document. Date, time, student name and how it was handled with follow up included.

          Example:

          2/3/08
          10:20 am

          Student: John Smith

          John would not stay in his seat and was causing a distraction during a history quiz. I felt he was a security risk.

          I asked John to return to his seat and he refused. He was becoming more aggressive and I feared for the safety of the other students. I called for security and when they came John had returned to his seat and he told security he had a cramp and needed to walk around but he was ok now. The other students would not say anything. Security felt he was not a threat and left him in the room. After security left John got out of his seat and came up to my desk in a threatening manner. I immediately gave him a pass to go see the Principal and he left the room.

          I followed up with the Principal and found that John had not go down to the office. I asked the Principal to call John out of his next class and talk with him. The Principal said she would take care of it.

          The next day John came to class and when I asked him if the Principal spoke with him he said, "That bitch knows better than to mess with me." He went to his seat and slept through the class.

          End of scenario.

          Now the teacher has written documentation and can take it to the next level, her union and the school board.

          If she is trying to run a educationally sound classroom and not getting support from the school administration than she has no alternative than to try and change or correct the administration of the school.

          Easier said than done, but as long as the teachers remain silent, then we the public will continue to get the fluff pieces mailed out by the Superintendent stating how safe and educationally sound our schools are. The teachers are the publics eyes and ears as to what goes on in the classrooms. If the teachers remain silent then, poor administrators and unruly students, will continue to get away with making the classrooms of our district unsafe and non educational environments.

          Kevin




          To: wccusdtalk@yahoogroups.comFrom: tag1022@...: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 21:37:47 +0000Subject: [wccusdtalk] security cameras in school




          A teacher described her desire to monitor her unruly classroom with acamera, but was told by an administrator that surveillance violatesprivacy laws. This seems a misinterpretation. Does anyone havedefinitive knowledge supporting either side? Todd Groves






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        • Mike Wasilchin
          At Island High School in Alameda, they have installed cameras in several indoor areas of the school to curb and monitor student behavior. They have had
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 3, 2008
            At Island High School in Alameda, they have installed cameras in several
            indoor areas of the school to curb and monitor student behavior. They have
            had problems with fighting, graffiti, destruction of property, theft, etc.
            I believe they have had success in identifying students that have misbehaved
            and also have videotape as evidence if the matter becomes criminal or needed
            for expulsion hearings. I am not sure what legal postings, declarations or
            agreements were needed but it seems to have curbed behavior at the school
            site.



            Michael Wasilchin

            Business Agent

            Public Employees Union, Local One

            4197 Lakeside Dr., Suite # 170

            Richmond, CA 94806

            Telephone # - (510) 222 - 5012

            Fax # - (510) 222 - 8858



            _____

            From: wccusdtalk@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wccusdtalk@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of imcookielady
            Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2008 7:44 PM
            To: wccusdtalk@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [wccusdtalk] Re: security cameras in school



            Todd:
            I moved to NC in 2005. They have cameras in the schools here. The
            only place they don't have them is in the locker rooms and the
            restrooms. They are in the classrooms, hallways and monitor around the
            outside of the school. This is how they caught a couple of kids who
            tagged the school as well as fights. I don't know about CA laws but
            there may/may not be a federal law that allows it. I know that the
            privacy laws for a student do not apply when it comes to searching
            their lockers, so I am wondering how an obvious camera can violate the
            same privacy laws. The principal at our school told me that it not
            only helps catch fights and other problems, but also prevents them. My
            kids have never felt safer in school.

            Jennifer Felix

            --- In wccusdtalk@yahoogro <mailto:wccusdtalk%40yahoogroups.com> ups.com,
            "Todd Groves" <tag1022@...> wrote:
            >
            > A teacher described her desire to monitor her unruly classroom with a
            > camera, but was told by an administrator that surveillance violates
            > privacy laws. This seems a misinterpretation. Does anyone have
            > definitive knowledge supporting either side?
            >
            > Todd Groves
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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