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WVN #261: Possible nurse shortage; superintendent evaluation

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  • waylandvoters1
    Dear Wayland Voter, WVN has reported recently on vital but usually little-noticed decisions made by the Conservation Commission. In this newsletter Linda Segal
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 12, 2008
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      Dear Wayland Voter,

      WVN has reported recently on vital but usually little-noticed decisions made by the Conservation Commission. In this newsletter Linda Segal reports on how the Board of Health is wrestling with
      significant matters involving the Town Center project and nurses in Wayland schools.

      Will the current budget provide adequate nursing care? What must be done to ensure that  the Town Center developers provide adequate waste disposal?

      Also in this newsletter: School Superintendent Gary Burton gets virtually perfect marks from the School Committee after a year including controversy and criticism.

      EXPERTISE SOUGHT

      Wayland is looking for residents with "expertise in all facets of energy conservation measures or alternative energy technologies to advise elected and appointed committees and our facilities
      director (town and schools)." Wayland is evaluating current systems and operations and preparing for new building projects.

      Contact Town Administrator Fred Turkington (358-7755), or fturkington@... for information.

      BYPASS BRIDGE OPENING

      The Massachusetts Highway Department plans to open the bypass bridge on Route 20 at 6 a.m. Saturday Sept. 13. Officials say signs will be posted to direct drivers but suggest caution in this
      area, which has been under construction for some time.

      SCHOOL NURSES STILL SHORT-FUNDED

      The budget for elementary school nurses was cut in a way that caught health officials by surprise. A physician member of the Board of Health has studied the effect at Claypit Hill School and
      reported deficiencies.

      Dr. Mark Neuman, the Board's newest member, is an emergency room pediatrician at Childrens Hospital. He visited Claypit during the first week of school and at the Board's Sept. 4 meeting
      reported a busy scene.

      The nurse's small room was visited by a large number of students with a full range of complaints and medical needs, he said.

      Neuman said the nurse did not have time to eat her lunch or document all the visits, and there are times when a second nurse seems needed. He was concerned that the format for documentation
      does not yield enough information to be evaluated. There is no written record of diagnosis or treatment, hindering follow-up and assessment of the delivery of services.

      Claypit has 610 students. The other elementary school, Happy Hollow, has 422.

      Neuman is the Board representative on a working group seeking to determine the adequacy of school nursing services as a result of the reconfiguration of Wayland's three elementary schools and
      a surprise cut in the Board budget.

      Background

      Until a few years ago, school nurses were provided by the Parmenter Health facility. The nurses serving our schools are now employed by the Wayland Health Department.

      The nurse reduction in the Fiscal 2009 Board of Health budget occurred after the Board had vetted its proposed budget last winter with the Finance Committee. Later, the Finance Committee
      reduced the school nurse budget without the knowledge of the Board.

      The cut disturbed the Board which worried about whether there would be adequate nurse coverage.

      Assuming the nurses have been fully utilized in recent years, almost the same total number of elementary school students (1213 in 2007 and 1210 in 2008) would still need the same health
      services, now spread over 2.5 instead of 3 elementary schools.

      During the previous school year, there was one full-time nurse at each of the elementary schools. With the reconfiguration in Fiscal 2009, there was a reduction of half a nurse at Loker. One .5
      FTE nurse remains at Loker to cover the half-day morning kindergarten for 178 enrolled students.

      When Loker students in grades 1-5 were redistributed to Claypit and Happy Hollow Schools, the nursing coverage did not increase commensurate with the students added to each school.

      Possible Solution

      One way to restore funding would have been by amending the budget on the floor of the April annual Town Meeting. An April 7 email from activist group SOSWayland (Save Our Services), urged
      voters to attend Town Meeting "to approve the budget" and "to defeat motions to decrease spending for any one line item. Any voter can make a motion on the floor...to change the budget..."

      An April 10 SOS email advocated the FinCom's budget as printed in the warrant, with no amendments.

      Usually a budget amendment to increase spending in one line item removes something from another part of the budget. It is also possible to seek a transfer from the General Fund, which is
      guarded closely by the Finance Committee. SOS is credited with great influence over Town Meeting votes.

      Nurses Working Group

      As reported in WVN newsletter #251, on the night of Town Meeting a decision was made by representatives of the Board of Health, FinCom and School Committee gathered at the back of the Field
      House to postpone proposing an amendment and instead form a working group to evaluate the matter more closely. The thinking was to restore the funding at the fall special Town Meeting once
      the need and cost could be more clearly quantified.

      In addition to Dr. Neuman, others in the Board's nurses working group are community nurse Ruth Mori, School Committee member Deborah Cohen, Finance Committee member Susan Pope, and
      Student Services Director Marlene Dodyk.

      The working group met several times over the summer. Nurse Mori presented data to them to demonstrate the need for increased nurse coverage, but there was push-back.

      Neuman reported some members of the group felt more evidence was needed to justify going to town meeting to restore the half-time nurse position ($25,000). . One working group member saw
      a need for more financial support to address drug and alcohol problems at the high school.

      Some want to see more hard data. They want more tracking and assessment of exactly how services are delivered to better define where they are shorthanded.

      Sept. 4 Discussion

      Dr. Neuman's report elicited a range of views from his BoH colleagues: why should the Board continue to be bullied on this matter; the Board finds itself spending so much time working on a
      problem created by others; it's difficult to make the nurse staffing situation equitable at all the schools; allocating nursing services to meet the variable needs (e.g. health screenings) at each
      school is complex; should staff complaints be the measure of how dire a need is; the Claypit nurse is working harder than she should and she needs more support; even if the Board submitted a
      warrant article to restore the funding, it could be removed from the warrant by the Board of Selectmen.

      A decision had been made at a previous meeting not to submit an article for the fall Town Meeting. The Sept. 4 discussion didn't change that decision, and by now the deadline for submitting
      warrant articles for the Nov. 12 fall town meeting has passed.

      The nurses working group plans to gather more data, quantify the need in greater detail, and work with the boards involved, such as the FinCom, School Committee and Board of Health.

      CENTER DEVELOPERS SEEK VARIANCE

      Before the $140-million Town Center project is built, the Board of Health must authorize improvements in handling waste water. The developer, Twenty Wayland, wants to do required septic
      system groundwater tests in October rather than in the spring, when there is usually greater variation in groundwater depth.

      Project manager Frank Dougherty asked the Board on Sept. 4 for a variance on the time of testing, which the Board approved, contingent on staff review and approval of historical data.

      Historical groundwater data is important. The Route 20 property has been extensively tested for years as part of the ongoing cleanup of hazardous waste at the site formerly occupied by
      Raytheon. The developer's environmental consultants have conducted their own testing in preparation for the redevelopment of the property, so there is a great deal of data.

      As the Board weighed whether or not to grant the variance, members were told by the applicant that there is no reason to expect that test results would differ dramatically if done in the spring
      rather than in the fall. Some Board members seemed troubled that the office staff had not yet seen the historical data necessary to evaluate those claims.

      The implied message seemed to be: approve the variance so as not to delay the project.

      The Board was working with limited information because the applicant delivered a hydrogeology and groundwater analysis only three working days before the meeting. Wayland's public health
      director, Steve Calichman, said he had not yet been able to review the historical data and he had not observed the applicant's field work related to this request.

      The majority of the project's sanitary waste will be discharged through a new town wastewater treatment plant which the developer maintains will be up and running in 2010. In addition to having
      rights to 45,000 gallons per day of maximum design flow at that plant, the developer seeks to install an additional 9,900-gallons-per-day septic system to meet the rest of the needs of the
      project.

      Twenty Wayland prefers to locate the Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment (FAST) septic system in the northeast area of the site, just east of the wastewater plant where the site plan shows a parking
      lot. In an Aug. 20 letter Julia Junghanns, Wayland health agent and sanitarian, informed the developer that Title V environmental regulations do not allow the primary leaching area to be under a
      parking lot.

      On the site plan, the developer's proposed "reserve" septic leaching area is shown under the projected "town green." The soils under the green make it the preferred primary location, however,
      according to Calichman.

      Calichman prefers that heavier waste (from food preparation and restaurants) be treated at the wastewater treatment plant and the "dry" waste (from retail or residential) by the septic system.

      Siting the septic system and its large leaching areas is complicated by Raytheon's groundwater cleanup. Septic groundwater discharges are not allowed to interfere with the flow of groundwater or
      push around the plumes of contaminants. So not only does the project's septic system need approval of the
      Board of Health, it also must pass muster with Raytheon.

      Twenty Wayland's Dougherty brought a hydrogeologist, the septic system design engineer, and a representative to explain FAST septic systems to the meeting. The Board asked detailed
      questions, such as:

      -- Why design the septic with no extra capacity for future growth or changes in uses? Why "play games" cutting it so close designing for 9,900 gallons per day knowing that 10,000 triggers a
      higher level of permitting and review? For example, what if the restaurants are so popular they generate more waste than the system was designed for? The developer seemed confident that the
      proposed system will meet the project's program and state environmental requirements.

      -- Will the project seek waivers? The answer was "maybe" and not specific. Could there be a disagreement between state Department of Environmental Protection and local standards for
      designing this septic system? Not clear.

      -- Are the proposed septic plans approved by Raytheon? Not yet. Is it possible the septic system could interfere with Raytheon's cleanup? Yes, depending on where it is.

      -- Should the Board require testing in season (next spring) as well? Problematic, because during project construction many monitoring wells will be closed or destroyed and then replaced later as
      needed, another detail requiring Raytheon's approval.

      Hydrogeologist Mark Kelley was asked how accurate his groundwater flow model was. Kelley relied on Raytheon's data, but Raytheon had not accepted the first modeling. While he said they were
      improving, they don't appear to have Raytheon's approval yet. The submittal document indicated the site and septic system design is being reviewed separately by Raytheon and its environmental
      consultants.

      The developer hopes to demolish the existing Raytheon lab building later this fall and begin construction in anticipation of opening retail shops in fall 2009.

      The developer has yet to complete renegotiating with Raytheon the existing deed restrictions that limit activities on this property.

      The septic system is not the only unresolved local permitting issue for the developer. Twenty Wayland is also in the midst of hearings at the Conservation Commission.

      Another factor that could affect the timing of project construction is what may be discovered under the existing building once it comes down.

      In large projects in other towns, infrastructure issues often have been addressed earlier in the local permitting process.

      SUPERINTENDENT'S EVALUATION

      On Aug. 25 the School Committee finished its annual evaluation ofSuperintendent Gary Burton. Burton has been criticized in the last year by members of the community for his role in the school
      reconfiguration,financial management, short-changing of technology in the schools, staff violation of election laws, and other matters, but none of that appears
      to be reflected in his evaluation.

      As in the past, longest-serving School Committee member Jeff Dieffenbach objected to any hint of criticism of the superintendent.

      He objected to a sentence in one of the evaluation drafts reading "For significant decisions on the order of magnitude of the elementary school reconfiguration, some members of the Committee
      would appreciate moreguidance from Dr. Burton regarding the appropriate process to follow in making such decisions. "

      Chairman Louis Jurist immediately supported Dieffenbach's objection. Members Heather Pineault and Deb Cohen said they felt pressured by Burton to decide prematurely which school should
      beclosed. But member Barbara Fletcher added her vote to delete the comment.

      After the sentence was deleted, the evaluation was approved unanimously.

      HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING

      Burton reported that Massachusetts  School Building Authority  Executive Director Katherine Craven says there is no policy decision regarding acceptability of privately funded extras in school
      building projects. State Treasurer Tim Cahill, Craven's boss, has strongly discouraged wealthier towns from providing luxurious extra amenities in their new school buildings.

      Turner Construction, Wayland's choice for Owner's Project Manager, and MSBA are having trouble agreeing on a contract. The High School Building Committee may move on to its second choice, a
      much smaller firm,  if Turner and MSBA reach a stalemate.

      As reported in other media, Craven said there is less money available than anticipated because of the poor economy (MSBA is funded by the sales tax, which is seeing lower collections this year). As
      a result, fewer projects will be funded than anticipated. That will reduce Wayland's chances of receiving early-round funding.

      ENROLLMENT

      Burton reported that Claypit Hill has 610 students this year as opposed to the projected 591, while at 422 Happy Hollow has six fewer than anticipated. Kindergarten, on the other hand, is
      enrolling 178, fourteen more than planned. "More children is good for the business", Burton said. Jurist admonished him to keep his "editorializing" to himself.

      With regard to section sizes, no classes are over School Committee policyguidelines at Claypit, while three fourth grade sections are over by one child at Happy Hollow. This is better than in
      previous years, as more children in fewer schools  allows classes to be divided more evenly.

      Burton reported that no extra buses were needed this year, contradicting predictions from former Loker parents that a need for more buses would partially negate savings from the elementary
      reconfiguration.

      However, WVN has received reports from parents that the first week of school was chaotic, with buses running more than an hour late, children being lost, children being crammed four to a seat,
      and children spending three hours a day on the bus. Some parents describe the situation as "dangerous".

      At week's end, Burton changed the elementary school schedule, moving it back by 15 minutes in an attempt to deal with the bus problems. Parents were promising a lively School Committee
      meeting Monday night.

      -- Tom Sciacca

      NOTICE TO READERS

      If you're reading this from a paper copy delivered by another WVN reader, please let us know if your situation has changed and you're now able to read newsletters via email. 

      The dedicated volunteers who deliver by car or post aren't complaining, but rising prices of gas, supplies  and postage prompt us to ask about the paperless "greener" alternative.  So if you are
      ready to switch from paper delivery, please email
      mmshort1@... and we'll add you to the electronic readership.

      Thanks.

      ==================================================
      To be sure you continue to receive WVN newsletters optimally and in your inbox (instead of bulk or junk folders) it may help to add to your address book or safe sender list:
      waylandvoters@...
      waylandvoters1@...
      ==================================================

      Thank you for reading this WVN newsletter. Please forward it to your friends and neighbors in Wayland. If they want to receive their own copy, they can send an email
      to waylandvoters@... and they will be signed up for the listserv. Or, they cansign themselves up by sending a blank email to:
      waylandvotersnetwork-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      Click reply and send after receiving an e-mail confirming the subscription.

      Wayland Voters Network
      Michael Short, Editor







      Dear Wayland Voter,

      WVN has reported recently on vital but usually little-noticed decisions made by the Conservation Commission. In this newsletter Linda Segal reports on how the Board of Health is wrestling with
      significant matters involving the Town Center project and nurses in Wayland schools.

      Will the current budget provide adequate nursing care? What must be done to ensure that  the Town Center developers provide adequate waste disposal?

      Also in this newsletter: School Superintendent Gary Burton gets virtually perfect marks from the School Committee after a year including controversy and criticism.

      EXPERTISE SOUGHT

      Wayland is looking for residents with "expertise in all facets of energy conservation measures or alternative energy technologies to advise elected and appointed committees and our facilities
      director (town and schools)." Wayland is evaluating current systems and operations and preparing for new building projects.

      Contact Town Administrator Fred Turkington (358-7755), or fturkington@... for information.

      BYPASS BRIDGE OPENING

      The Massachusetts Highway Department plans to open the bypass bridge on Route 20 at 6 a.m. Saturday Sept. 13. Officials say signs will be posted to direct drivers but suggest caution in this
      area, which has been under construction for some time.

      SCHOOL NURSES STILL SHORT-FUNDED

      The budget for elementary school nurses was cut in a way that caught health officials by surprise. A physician member of the Board of Health has studied the effect at Claypit Hill School and
      reported deficiencies.

      Dr. Mark Neuman, the Board's newest member, is an emergency room pediatrician at Childrens Hospital. He visited Claypit during the first week of school and at the Board's Sept. 4 meeting
      reported a busy scene. The nurse's small room was visited by a large number of students with a full range of complaints and medical needs, he said.

      Neuman said the nurse did not have time to eat her lunch or document all the visits, and there are times when a second nurse seems needed. He was concerned that the format for documentation
      does not yield enough information to be evaluated. There is no written record of diagnosis or treatment, hindering follow-up and assessment of the delivery of services.

      Claypit has 610 students. The other elementary school, Happy Hollow, has 422.

      Neuman is the Board representative on a working group seeking to determine the adequacy of school nursing services as a result of the reconfiguration of Wayland's three elementary schools and
      a surprise cut in the Board budget.

      Background

      Until a few years ago, school nurses were provided by the Parmenter Health facility. The nurses serving our schools are now employed by the Wayland Health Department.

      The nurse reduction in the Fiscal 2009 Board of Health budget occurred after the Board had vetted its proposed budget last winter with the Finance Committee. Later, the Finance Committee
      reduced the school nurse budget without the knowledge of the Board.

      The cut disturbed the Board which worried about whether there would be adequate nurse coverage.

      Assuming the nurses have been fully utilized in recent years, almost the same total number of elementary school students (1213 in 2007 and 1210 in 2008) would still need the same health
      services, now spread over 2.5 instead of 3 elementary schools.

      During the previous school year, there was one full-time nurse at each of the elementary schools. With the reconfiguration in Fiscal 2009, there was a reduction of half a nurse at Loker. One .5
      FTE nurse remains at Loker to cover the half-day morning kindergarten for 178 enrolled students.

      When Loker students in grades 1-5 were redistributed to Claypit and Happy Hollow Schools, the nursing coverage did not increase commensurate with the students added to each school.

      Possible Solution

      One way to restore funding would have been by amending the budget on the floor of the April annual Town Meeting. An April 7 email from activist group SOSWayland (Save Our Services), urged
      voters to attend Town Meeting "to approve the budget" and "to defeat motions to decrease spending for any one line item. Any voter can make a motion on the floor...to change the budget..."

      An April 10 SOS email advocated the FinCom's budget as printed in the warrant, with no amendments.

      Usually a budget amendment to increase spending in one line item removes something from another part of the budget. It is also possible to seek a transfer from the General Fund, which is
      guarded closely by the Finance Committee. SOS is credited with great influence over Town Meeting votes.

      Nurses Working Group

      As reported in WVN newsletter #251, on the night of Town Meeting a decision was made by representatives of the Board of Health, FinCom and School Committee gathered at the back of the Field
      House to postpone proposing an amendment and instead form a working group to evaluate the matter more closely. The thinking was to restore the funding at the fall special Town Meeting once
      the need and cost could be more clearly quantified.

      In addition to Dr. Neuman, others in the Board's nurses working group are community nurse Ruth Mori, School Committee member Deborah Cohen, Finance Committee member Susan Pope, and
      Student Services Director Marlene Dodyk.

      The working group met several times over the summer. Nurse Mori presented data to them to demonstrate the need for increased nurse coverage, but there was push-back.

      Neuman reported some members of the group felt more evidence was needed to justify going to town meeting to restore the half-time nurse position ($25,000). . One working group member saw
      a need for more financial support to address drug and alcohol problems at the high school.

      Some want to see more hard data. They want more tracking and assessment of exactly how services are delivered to better define where they are shorthanded.

      Sept. 4 Discussion

      Dr. Neuman's report elicited a range of views from his BoH colleagues: why should the Board continue to be bullied on this matter; the Board finds itself spending so much time working on a
      problem created by others; it's difficult to make the nurse staffing situation equitable at all the schools; allocating nursing services to meet the variable needs (e.g. health screenings) at each
      school is complex; should staff complaints be the measure of how dire a need is; the Claypit nurse is working harder than she should and she needs more support; even if the Board submitted a
      warrant article to restore the funding, it could be removed from the warrant by the Board of Selectmen.

      A decision had been made at a previous meeting not to submit an article for the fall Town Meeting. The Sept. 4 discussion didn't change that decision, and by now the deadline for submitting
      warrant articles for the Nov. 12 fall town meeting has passed.

      The nurses working group plans to gather more data, quantify the need in greater detail, and work with the boards involved, such as the FinCom, School Committee and Board of Health.


      CENTER DEVELOPERS SEEK VARIANCE

      Before the $140-million Town Center project is built, the Board of Health must authorize improvements in handling waste water. The developer, Twenty Wayland, wants to do required septic
      system groundwater tests in October rather than in the spring, when there is usually greater variation in groundwater depth.

      Project manager Frank Dougherty asked the Board on Sept. 4 for a variance on the time of testing, which the Board approved, contingent on staff review and approval of historical data.

      Historical groundwater data is important. The Route 20 property has been extensively tested for years as part of the ongoing cleanup of hazardous waste at the site formerly occupied by
      Raytheon. The developer's environmental consultants have conducted their own testing in preparation for the redevelopment of the property, so there is a great deal of data.

      As the Board weighed whether or not to grant the variance, members were told by the applicant that there is no reason to expect that test results would differ dramatically if done in the spring
      rather than in the fall. Some Board members seemed troubled that the office staff had not yet seen the historical data necessary to evaluate those claims. The implied message seemed to be:
      approve the variance so as not to delay the project.

      The Board was working with limited information because the applicant delivered a hydrogeology and groundwater analysis only three working days before the meeting. Wayland's public health
      director, Steve Calichman, said he had not yet been able to review the historical data and he had not observed the applicant's field work related to this request.

      The majority of the project's sanitary waste will be discharged through a new town wastewater treatment plant which the developer maintains will be up and running in 2010. In addition to having
      rights to 45,000 gallons per day of maximum design flow at that plant, the developer seeks to install an additional 9,900-gallons-per-day septic system to meet the rest of the needs of the
      project.

      Twenty Wayland prefers to locate the Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment (FAST) septic system in the northeast area of the site, just east of the wastewater plant where the site plan shows a parking
      lot. In an Aug. 20 letter Julia Junghanns, Wayland health agent and sanitarian, informed the developer that Title V environmental regulations do not allow the primary leaching area to be under a
      parking lot.

      On the site plan, the developer's proposed "reserve" septic leaching area is shown under the projected "town green." The soils under the green make it the preferred primary location, however,
      according to Calichman.

      Calichman prefers that heavier waste (from food preparation and restaurants) be treated at the wastewater treatment plant and the "dry" waste (from retail or residential) by the septic system.

      Siting the septic system and its large leaching areas is complicated by Raytheon's groundwater cleanup. Septic groundwater discharges are not allowed to interfere with the flow of groundwater or
      push around the plumes of contaminants. So not only does the project's septic system need approval of the
      Board of Health, it also must pass muster with Raytheon.

      Twenty Wayland's Dougherty brought a hydrogeologist, the septic system design engineer, and a representative to explain FAST septic systems to the meeting. The Board asked detailed
      questions, such as:

      -- Why design the septic with no extra capacity for future growth or changes in uses? Why "play games" cutting it so close designing for 9,900 gallons per day knowing that 10,000 triggers a
      higher level of permitting and review? For example, what if the restaurants are so popular they generate more waste than the system was designed for? The developer seemed confident that the
      proposed system will meet the project's program and state environmental requirements.

      -- Will the project seek waivers? The answer was "maybe" and not specific. Could there be a disagreement between state Department of Environmental Protection and local standards for
      designing this septic system? Not clear.

      -- Are the proposed septic plans approved by Raytheon? Not yet. Is it possible the septic system could interfere with Raytheon's cleanup? Yes, depending on where it is.

      -- Should the Board require testing in season (next spring) as well? Problematic, because during project construction many monitoring wells will be closed or destroyed and then replaced later as
      needed, another detail requiring Raytheon's approval.

      Hydrogeologist Mark Kelley was asked how accurate his groundwater flow model was. Kelley relied on Raytheon's data, but Raytheon had not accepted the first modeling. While he said they were
      improving, they don't appear to have Raytheon's approval yet. The submittal document indicated the site and septic system design is being reviewed separately by Raytheon and its environmental
      consultants.

      The developer hopes to demolish the existing Raytheon lab building later this fall and begin construction in anticipation of opening retail shops in fall 2009.

      The developer has yet to complete renegotiating with Raytheon the existing deed restrictions that limit activities on this property.

      The septic system is not the only unresolved local permitting issue for the developer. Twenty Wayland is also in the midst of hearings at the Conservation Commission.

      Another factor that could affect the timing of project construction is what may be discovered under the existing building once it comes down.

      In large projects in other towns, infrastructure issues often have been addressed earlier in the local permitting process.

      SUPERINTENDENT'S EVALUATION

      On Aug. 25 the School Committee finished its annual evaluation ofSuperintendent Gary Burton. Burton has been criticized in the last year by members of the community for his role in the school
      reconfiguration,financial management, short-changing of technology in the schools, staff violation of election laws, and other matters, but none of that appears
      to be reflected in his evaluation.

      As in the past, longest-serving School Committee member Jeff Dieffenbach objected to any hint of criticism of the superintendent.

      He objected to a sentence in one of the evaluation drafts reading "For significant decisions on the order of magnitude of the elementary school reconfiguration, some members of the Committee
      would appreciate moreguidance from Dr. Burton regarding the appropriate process to follow in making such decisions. " Chairman Louis Jurist immediately supported Dieffenbach's objection.
      Members Heather Pineault and Deb Cohen said they felt pressured by Burton to decide prematurely which school should beclosed. But member Barbara Fletcher added her vote to delete the
      comment.

      After the sentence was deleted, the evaluation was approved unanimously.

      HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING

      Burton reported that Massachusetts  School Building Authority  Executive Director Katherine Craven says there is no policy decision regarding acceptability of privately funded extras in school
      building projects. State Treasurer Tim Cahill, Craven's boss, has stronglydiscouraged wealthier towns from providing luxurious extra amenities in their new school buildings.

      Turner Construction, Wayland's choice for Owner's Project Manager, and MSBA are having trouble agreeing on a contract. The High School BuildingCommittee may move on to its second choice, a
      much smaller firm,  if Turner and MSBA reach a stalemate.

      As reported in other media, Craven said there is less money available than anticipated because of the poor economy (MSBA is funded by the sales tax, which is seeing lower collections this year). As
      a result, fewer projects will be funded than anticipated. That will reduce Wayland's chances of receiving early-round funding.

      ENROLLMENT

      Burton reported that Claypit Hill has 610 students this year as opposed to the projected 591, while at 422 Happy Hollow has six fewer than anticipated. Kindergarten, on the other hand, is
      enrolling 178, fourteen more than planned. "More children is good for the business", Burton said. Jurist admonished him to keep his "editorializing" to himself.

      With regard to section sizes, no classes are over School Committee policyguidelines at Claypit, while three fourth grade sections are over by one child at Happy Hollow. This is better than in
      previous years, as more children in fewer schools  allows classes to be divided more evenly.

      Burton reported that no extra buses were needed this year, contradicting predictions from former Loker parents that a need for more buses would partially negate savings from the elementary
      reconfiguration.

      However, WVN has received reports from parents that the first week of school was chaotic, with buses running more than an hour late, children being lost, children being crammed four to a seat,
      and children spending three hours a day on the bus. Some parents describe the situation as "dangerous".

      At week's end, Burton changed the elementary school schedule, moving it back by 15 minutes in an attempt to deal with the bus problems. Parents were promising a lively School Committee
      meeting Monday night.

      -- Tom Sciacca


      NOTICE TO READERS

      If you're reading this from a paper copy delivered by another WVN reader, please let us know if your situation has changed and you're now able to read newsletters via email. 

      The dedicated volunteers who deliver by car or post aren't complaining, but rising prices of gas, supplies  and postage prompt us to ask about the paperless "greener" alternative.  So if you are
      ready to switch from paper delivery, please email
      mmshort1@... and we'll add you to the electronic readership.

      Thanks.

      ==================================================
      To be sure you continue to receive WVN newsletters optimally and in your inbox (instead of bulk or junk folders) it may help to add to your address book or safe sender list:
      waylandvoters@...
      waylandvoters1@...
      ==================================================

      Thank you for reading this WVN newsletter. Please forward it to your friends and neighbors in Wayland. If they want to receive their own copy, they can send an email
      to waylandvoters@... and they will be signed up for the listserv. Or, they cansign themselves up by sending a blank email to:
      waylandvotersnetwork-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      Click reply and send after receiving an e-mail confirming the subscription.

      Wayland Voters Network
      Michael Short, Editor











      Dear Wayland Voter,

      WVN has reported recently on vital but usually little-noticed decisions made by the Conservation Commission. In this newsletter Linda Segal reports on how the Board of Health is wrestling with
      significant matters involving the Town Center project and nurses in Wayland schools.

      Will the current budget provide adequate nursing care? What must be done to ensure that  the Town Center developers provide adequate waste disposal?

      Also in this newsletter: School Superintendent Gary Burton gets virtually perfect marks from the School Committee after a year including controversy and criticism.

      EXPERTISE SOUGHT

      Wayland is looking for residents with "expertise in all facets of energy conservation measures or alternative energy technologies to advise elected and appointed committees and our facilities
      director (town and schools)." Wayland is evaluating current systems and operations and preparing for new building projects.

      Contact Town Administrator Fred Turkington (358-7755), or fturkington@... for information.

      BYPASS BRIDGE OPENING

      The Massachusetts Highway Department plans to open the bypass bridge on Route 20 at 6 a.m. Saturday Sept. 13. Officials say signs will be posted to direct drivers but suggest caution in this
      area, which has been under construction for some time.

      SCHOOL NURSES STILL SHORT-FUNDED

      The budget for elementary school nurses was cut in a way that caught health officials by surprise. A physician member of the Board of Health has studied the effect at Claypit Hill School and
      reported deficiencies.

      Dr. Mark Neuman, the Board's newest member, is an emergency room pediatrician at Childrens Hospital. He visited Claypit during the first week of school and at the Board's Sept. 4 meeting
      reported a busy scene. The nurse's small room was visited by a large number of students with a full range of complaints and medical needs, he said.

      Neuman said the nurse did not have time to eat her lunch or document all the visits, and there are times when a second nurse seems needed. He was concerned that the format for documentation
      does not yield enough information to be evaluated. There is no written record of diagnosis or treatment, hindering follow-up and assessment of the delivery of services.

      Claypit has 610 students. The other elementary school, Happy Hollow, has 422.

      Neuman is the Board representative on a working group seeking to determine the adequacy of school nursing services as a result of the reconfiguration of Wayland's three elementary schools and
      a surprise cut in the Board budget.

      Background

      Until a few years ago, school nurses were provided by the Parmenter Health facility. The nurses serving our schools are now employed by the Wayland Health Department.

      The nurse reduction in the Fiscal 2009 Board of Health budget occurred after the Board had vetted its proposed budget last winter with the Finance Committee. Later, the Finance Committee
      reduced the school nurse budget without the knowledge of the Board.

      The cut disturbed the Board which worried about whether there would be adequate nurse coverage.

      Assuming the nurses have been fully utilized in recent years, almost the same total number of elementary school students (1213 in 2007 and 1210 in 2008) would still need the same health
      services, now spread over 2.5 instead of 3 elementary schools.

      During the previous school year, there was one full-time nurse at each of the elementary schools. With the reconfiguration in Fiscal 2009, there was a reduction of half a nurse at Loker. One .5
      FTE nurse remains at Loker to cover the half-day morning kindergarten for 178 enrolled students.

      When Loker students in grades 1-5 were redistributed to Claypit and Happy Hollow Schools, the nursing coverage did not increase commensurate with the students added to each school.

      Possible Solution

      One way to restore funding would have been by amending the budget on the floor of the April annual Town Meeting. An April 7 email from activist group SOSWayland (Save Our Services), urged
      voters to attend Town Meeting "to approve the budget" and "to defeat motions to decrease spending for any one line item. Any voter can make a motion on the floor...to change the budget..."

      An April 10 SOS email advocated the FinCom's budget as printed in the warrant, with no amendments.

      Usually a budget amendment to increase spending in one line item removes something from another part of the budget. It is also possible to seek a transfer from the General Fund, which is
      guarded closely by the Finance Committee. SOS is credited with great influence over Town Meeting votes.

      Nurses Working Group

      As reported in WVN newsletter #251, on the night of Town Meeting a decision was made by representatives of the Board of Health, FinCom and School Committee gathered at the back of the Field
      House to postpone proposing an amendment and instead form a working group to evaluate the matter more closely. The thinking was to restore the funding at the fall special Town Meeting once
      the need and cost could be more clearly quantified.

      In addition to Dr. Neuman, others in the Board's nurses working group are community nurse Ruth Mori, School Committee member Deborah Cohen, Finance Committee member Susan Pope, and
      Student Services Director Marlene Dodyk.

      The working group met several times over the summer. Nurse Mori presented data to them to demonstrate the need for increased nurse coverage, but there was push-back.

      Neuman reported some members of the group felt more evidence was needed to justify going to town meeting to restore the half-time nurse position ($25,000). . One working group member saw
      a need for more financial support to address drug and alcohol problems at the high school.

      Some want to see more hard data. They want more tracking and assessment of exactly how services are delivered to better define where they are shorthanded.

      Sept. 4 Discussion

      Dr. Neuman's report elicited a range of views from his BoH colleagues: why should the Board continue to be bullied on this matter; the Board finds itself spending so much time working on a
      problem created by others; it's difficult to make the nurse staffing situation equitable at all the schools; allocating nursing services to meet the variable needs (e.g. health screenings) at each
      school is complex; should staff complaints be the measure of how dire a need is; the Claypit nurse is working harder than she should and she needs more support; even if the Board submitted a
      warrant article to restore the funding, it could be removed from the warrant by the Board of Selectmen.

      A decision had been made at a previous meeting not to submit an article for the fall Town Meeting. The Sept. 4 discussion didn't change that decision, and by now the deadline for submitting
      warrant articles for the Nov. 12 fall town meeting has passed.

      The nurses working group plans to gather more data, quantify the need in greater detail, and work with the boards involved, such as the FinCom, School Committee and Board of Health.


      CENTER DEVELOPERS SEEK VARIANCE

      Before the $140-million Town Center project is built, the Board of Health must authorize improvements in handling waste water. The developer, Twenty Wayland, wants to do required septic
      system groundwater tests in October rather than in the spring, when there is usually greater variation in groundwater depth.

      Project manager Frank Dougherty asked the Board on Sept. 4 for a variance on the time of testing, which the Board approved, contingent on staff review and approval of historical data.

      Historical groundwater data is important. The Route 20 property has been extensively tested for years as part of the ongoing cleanup of hazardous waste at the site formerly occupied by
      Raytheon. The developer's environmental consultants have conducted their own testing in preparation for the redevelopment of the property, so there is a great deal of data.

      As the Board weighed whether or not to grant the variance, members were told by the applicant that there is no reason to expect that test results would differ dramatically if done in the spring
      rather than in the fall. Some Board members seemed troubled that the office staff had not yet seen the historical data necessary to evaluate those claims. The implied message seemed to be:
      approve the variance so as not to delay the project.

      The Board was working with limited information because the applicant delivered a hydrogeology and groundwater analysis only three working days before the meeting. Wayland's public health
      director, Steve Calichman, said he had not yet been able to review the historical data and he had not observed the applicant's field work related to this request.

      The majority of the project's sanitary waste will be discharged through a new town wastewater treatment plant which the developer maintains will be up and running in 2010. In addition to having
      rights to 45,000 gallons per day of maximum design flow at that plant, the developer seeks to install an additional 9,900-gallons-per-day septic system to meet the rest of the needs of the
      project.

      Twenty Wayland prefers to locate the Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment (FAST) septic system in the northeast area of the site, just east of the wastewater plant where the site plan shows a parking
      lot. In an Aug. 20 letter Julia Junghanns, Wayland health agent and sanitarian, informed the developer that Title V environmental regulations do not allow the primary leaching area to be under a
      parking lot.

      On the site plan, the developer's proposed "reserve" septic leaching area is shown under the projected "town green." The soils under the green make it the preferred primary location, however,
      according to Calichman.

      Calichman prefers that heavier waste (from food preparation and restaurants) be treated at the wastewater treatment plant and the "dry" waste (from retail or residential) by the septic system.

      Siting the septic system and its large leaching areas is complicated by Raytheon's groundwater cleanup. Septic groundwater discharges are not allowed to interfere with the flow of groundwater or
      push around the plumes of contaminants. So not only does the project's septic system need approval of the
      Board of Health, it also must pass muster with Raytheon.

      Twenty Wayland's Dougherty brought a hydrogeologist, the septic system design engineer, and a representative to explain FAST septic systems to the meeting. The Board asked detailed
      questions, such as:

      -- Why design the septic with no extra capacity for future growth or changes in uses? Why "play games" cutting it so close designing for 9,900 gallons per day knowing that 10,000 triggers a
      higher level of permitting and review? For example, what if the restaurants are so popular they generate more waste than the system was designed for? The developer seemed confident that the
      proposed system will meet the project's program and state environmental requirements.

      -- Will the project seek waivers? The answer was "maybe" and not specific. Could there be a disagreement between state Department of Environmental Protection and local standards for
      designing this septic system? Not clear.

      -- Are the proposed septic plans approved by Raytheon? Not yet. Is it possible the septic system could interfere with Raytheon's cleanup? Yes, depending on where it is.

      -- Should the Board require testing in season (next spring) as well? Problematic, because during project construction many monitoring wells will be closed or destroyed and then replaced later as
      needed, another detail requiring Raytheon's approval.

      Hydrogeologist Mark Kelley was asked how accurate his groundwater flow model was. Kelley relied on Raytheon's data, but Raytheon had not accepted the first modeling. While he said they were
      improving, they don't appear to have Raytheon's approval yet. The submittal document indicated the site and septic system design is being reviewed separately by Raytheon and its environmental
      consultants.

      The developer hopes to demolish the existing Raytheon lab building later this fall and begin construction in anticipation of opening retail shops in fall 2009.

      The developer has yet to complete renegotiating with Raytheon the existing deed restrictions that limit activities on this property.

      The septic system is not the only unresolved local permitting issue for the developer. Twenty Wayland is also in the midst of hearings at the Conservation Commission.

      Another factor that could affect the timing of project construction is what may be discovered under the existing building once it comes down.

      In large projects in other towns, infrastructure issues often have been addressed earlier in the local permitting process.

      SUPERINTENDENT'S EVALUATION

      On Aug. 25 the School Committee finished its annual evaluation ofSuperintendent Gary Burton. Burton has been criticized in the last year by members of the community for his role in the school
      reconfiguration,financial management, short-changing of technology in the schools, staff violation of election laws, and other matters, but none of that appears
      to be reflected in his evaluation.

      As in the past, longest-serving School Committee member Jeff Dieffenbach objected to any hint of criticism of the superintendent.

      He objected to a sentence in one of the evaluation drafts reading "For significant decisions on the order of magnitude of the elementary school reconfiguration, some members of the Committee
      would appreciate moreguidance from Dr. Burton regarding the appropriate process to follow in making such decisions. " Chairman Louis Jurist immediately supported Dieffenbach's objection.
      Members Heather Pineault and Deb Cohen said they felt pressured by Burton to decide prematurely which school should beclosed. But member Barbara Fletcher added her vote to delete the
      comment.

      After the sentence was deleted, the evaluation was approved unanimously.

      HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING

      Burton reported that Massachusetts  School Building Authority  Executive Director Katherine Craven says there is no policy decision regarding acceptability of privately funded extras in school
      building projects. State Treasurer Tim Cahill, Craven's boss, has stronglydiscouraged wealthier towns from providing luxurious extra amenities in their new school buildings.

      Turner Construction, Wayland's choice for Owner's Project Manager, and MSBA are having trouble agreeing on a contract. The High School BuildingCommittee may move on to its second choice, a
      much smaller firm,  if Turner and MSBA reach a stalemate.

      As reported in other media, Craven said there is less money available than anticipated because of the poor economy (MSBA is funded by the sales tax, which is seeing lower collections this year). As
      a result, fewer projects will be funded than anticipated. That will reduce Wayland's chances of receiving early-round funding.

      ENROLLMENT

      Burton reported that Claypit Hill has 610 students this year as opposed to the projected 591, while at 422 Happy Hollow has six fewer than anticipated. Kindergarten, on the other hand, is
      enrolling 178, fourteen more than planned. "More children is good for the business", Burton said. Jurist admonished him to keep his "editorializing" to himself.

      With regard to section sizes, no classes are over School Committee policyguidelines at Claypit, while three fourth grade sections are over by one child at Happy Hollow. This is better than in
      previous years, as more children in fewer schools  allows classes to be divided more evenly.

      Burton reported that no extra buses were needed this year, contradicting predictions from former Loker parents that a need for more buses would partially negate savings from the elementary
      reconfiguration.

      However, WVN has received reports from parents that the first week of school was chaotic, with buses running more than an hour late, children being lost, children being crammed four to a seat,
      and children spending three hours a day on the bus. Some parents describe the situation as "dangerous".

      At week's end, Burton changed the elementary school schedule, moving it back by 15 minutes in an attempt to deal with the bus problems. Parents were promising a lively School Committee
      meeting Monday night.

      -- Tom Sciacca


      NOTICE TO READERS

      If you're reading this from a paper copy delivered by another WVN reader, please let us know if your situation has changed and you're now able to read newsletters via email. 

      The dedicated volunteers who deliver by car or post aren't complaining, but rising prices of gas, supplies  and postage prompt us to ask about the paperless "greener" alternative.  So if you are
      ready to switch from paper delivery, please email
      mmshort1@... and we'll add you to the electronic readership.

      Thanks.

      ==================================================
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      waylandvoters@...
      waylandvoters1@...
      ==================================================

      Thank you for reading this WVN newsletter. Please forward it to your friends and neighbors in Wayland. If they want to receive their own copy, they can send an email
      to waylandvoters@... and they will be signed up for the listserv. Or, they cansign themselves up by sending a blank email to:
      waylandvotersnetwork-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      Click reply and send after receiving an e-mail confirming the subscription.

      Wayland Voters Network
      Michael Short, Editor










      Dear Wayland Voter,

      WVN has reported recently on vital but usually little-noticed decisions made by the Conservation Commission. In this newsletter Linda Segal reports on how the Board of Health is wrestling with
      significant matters involving the Town Center project and nurses in Wayland schools.

      Will the current budget provide adequate nursing care? What must be done to ensure that  the Town Center developers provide adequate waste disposal?

      Also in this newsletter: School Superintendent Gary Burton gets virtually perfect marks from the School Committee after a year including controversy and criticism.

      EXPERTISE SOUGHT

      Wayland is looking for residents with "expertise in all facets of energy conservation measures or alternative energy technologies to advise elected and appointed committees and our facilities
      director (town and schools)." Wayland is evaluating current systems and operations and preparing for new building projects.

      Contact Town Administrator Fred Turkington (358-7755), or fturkington@... for information.

      BYPASS BRIDGE OPENING

      The Massachusetts Highway Department plans to open the bypass bridge on Route 20 at 6 a.m. Saturday Sept. 13. Officials say signs will be posted to direct drivers but suggest caution in this
      area, which has been under construction for some time.

      SCHOOL NURSES STILL SHORT-FUNDED

      The budget for elementary school nurses was cut in a way that caught health officials by surprise. A physician member of the Board of Health has studied the effect at Claypit Hill School and
      reported deficiencies.

      Dr. Mark Neuman, the Board's newest member, is an emergency room pediatrician at Childrens Hospital. He visited Claypit during the first week of school and at the Board's Sept. 4 meeting
      reported a busy scene. The nurse's small room was visited by a large number of students with a full range of complaints and medical needs, he said.

      Neuman said the nurse did not have time to eat her lunch or document all the visits, and there are times when a second nurse seems needed. He was concerned that the format for documentation
      does not yield enough information to be evaluated. There is no written record of diagnosis or treatment, hindering follow-up and assessment of the delivery of services.

      Claypit has 610 students. The other elementary school, Happy Hollow, has 422.

      Neuman is the Board representative on a working group seeking to determine the adequacy of school nursing services as a result of the reconfiguration of Wayland's three elementary schools and
      a surprise cut in the Board budget.

      Background

      Until a few years ago, school nurses were provided by the Parmenter Health facility. The nurses serving our schools are now employed by the Wayland Health Department.

      The nurse reduction in the Fiscal 2009 Board of Health budget occurred after the Board had vetted its proposed budget last winter with the Finance Committee. Later, the Finance Committee
      reduced the school nurse budget without the knowledge of the Board.

      The cut disturbed the Board which worried about whether there would be adequate nurse coverage.

      Assuming the nurses have been fully utilized in recent years, almost the same total number of elementary school students (1213 in 2007 and 1210 in 2008) would still need the same health
      services, now spread over 2.5 instead of 3 elementary schools.

      During the previous school year, there was one full-time nurse at each of the elementary schools. With the reconfiguration in Fiscal 2009, there was a reduction of half a nurse at Loker. One .5
      FTE nurse remains at Loker to cover the half-day morning kindergarten for 178 enrolled students.

      When Loker students in grades 1-5 were redistributed to Claypit and Happy Hollow Schools, the nursing coverage did not increase commensurate with the students added to each school.

      Possible Solution

      One way to restore funding would have been by amending the budget on the floor of the April annual Town Meeting. An April 7 email from activist group SOSWayland (Save Our Services), urged
      voters to attend Town Meeting "to approve the budget" and "to defeat motions to decrease spending for any one line item. Any voter can make a motion on the floor...to change the budget..."

      An April 10 SOS email advocated the FinCom's budget as printed in the warrant, with no amendments.

      Usually a budget amendment to increase spending in one line item removes something from another part of the budget. It is also possible to seek a transfer from the General Fund, which is
      guarded closely by the Finance Committee. SOS is credited with great influence over Town Meeting votes.

      Nurses Working Group

      As reported in WVN newsletter #251, on the night of Town Meeting a decision was made by representatives of the Board of Health, FinCom and School Committee gathered at the back of the Field
      House to postpone proposing an amendment and instead form a working group to evaluate the matter more closely. The thinking was to restore the funding at the fall special Town Meeting once
      the need and cost could be more clearly quantified.

      In addition to Dr. Neuman, others in the Board's nurses working group are community nurse Ruth Mori, School Committee member Deborah Cohen, Finance Committee member Susan Pope, and
      Student Services Director Marlene Dodyk.

      The working group met several times over the summer. Nurse Mori presented data to them to demonstrate the need for increased nurse coverage, but there was push-back.

      Neuman reported some members of the group felt more evidence was needed to justify going to town meeting to restore the half-time nurse position ($25,000). . One working group member saw
      a need for more financial support to address drug and alcohol problems at the high school.

      Some want to see more hard data. They want more tracking and assessment of exactly how services are delivered to better define where they are shorthanded.

      Sept. 4 Discussion

      Dr. Neuman's report elicited a range of views from his BoH colleagues: why should the Board continue to be bullied on this matter; the Board finds itself spending so much time working on a
      problem created by others; it's difficult to make the nurse staffing situation equitable at all the schools; allocating nursing services to meet the variable needs (e.g. health screenings) at each
      school is complex; should staff complaints be the measure of how dire a need is; the Claypit nurse is working harder than she should and she needs more support; even if the Board submitted a
      warrant article to restore the funding, it could be removed from the warrant by the Board of Selectmen.

      A decision had been made at a previous meeting not to submit an article for the fall Town Meeting. The Sept. 4 discussion didn't change that decision, and by now the deadline for submitting
      warrant articles for the Nov. 12 fall town meeting has passed.

      The nurses working group plans to gather more data, quantify the need in greater detail, and work with the boards involved, such as the FinCom, School Committee and Board of Health.


      CENTER DEVELOPERS SEEK VARIANCE

      Before the $140-million Town Center project is built, the Board of Health must authorize improvements in handling waste water. The developer, Twenty Wayland, wants to do required septic
      system groundwater tests in October rather than in the spring, when there is usually greater variation in groundwater depth.

      Project manager Frank Dougherty asked the Board on Sept. 4 for a variance on the time of testing, which the Board approved, contingent on staff review and approval of historical data.

      Historical groundwater data is important. The Route 20 property has been extensively tested for years as part of the ongoing cleanup of hazardous waste at the site formerly occupied by
      Raytheon. The developer's environmental consultants have conducted their own testing in preparation for the redevelopment of the property, so there is a great deal of data.

      As the Board weighed whether or not to grant the variance, members were told by the applicant that there is no reason to expect that test results would differ dramatically if done in the spring
      rather than in the fall. Some Board members seemed troubled that the office staff had not yet seen the historical data necessary to evaluate those claims. The implied message seemed to be:
      approve the variance so as not to delay the project.

      The Board was working with limited information because the applicant delivered a hydrogeology and groundwater analysis only three working days before the meeting. Wayland's public health
      director, Steve Calichman, said he had not yet been able to review the historical data and he had not observed the applicant's field work related to this request.

      The majority of the project's sanitary waste will be discharged through a new town wastewater treatment plant which the developer maintains will be up and running in 2010. In addition to having
      rights to 45,000 gallons per day of maximum design flow at that plant, the developer seeks to install an additional 9,900-gallons-per-day septic system to meet the rest of the needs of the
      project.

      Twenty Wayland prefers to locate the Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment (FAST) septic system in the northeast area of the site, just east of the wastewater plant where the site plan shows a parking
      lot. In an Aug. 20 letter Julia Junghanns, Wayland health agent and sanitarian, informed the developer that Title V environmental regulations do not allow the primary leaching area to be under a
      parking lot.

      On the site plan, the developer's proposed "reserve" septic leaching area is shown under the projected "town green." The soils under the green make it the preferred primary location, however,
      according to Calichman.

      Calichman prefers that heavier waste (from food preparation and restaurants) be treated at the wastewater treatment plant and the "dry" waste (from retail or residential) by the septic system.

      Siting the septic system and its large leaching areas is complicated by Raytheon's groundwater cleanup. Septic groundwater discharges are not allowed to interfere with the flow of groundwater or
      push around the plumes of contaminants. So not only does the project's septic system need approval of the
      Board of Health, it also must pass muster with Raytheon.

      Twenty Wayland's Dougherty brought a hydrogeologist, the septic system design engineer, and a representative to explain FAST septic systems to the meeting. The Board asked detailed
      questions, such as:

      -- Why design the septic with no extra capacity for future growth or changes in uses? Why "play games" cutting it so close designing for 9,900 gallons per day knowing that 10,000 triggers a
      higher level of permitting and review? For example, what if the restaurants are so popular they generate more waste than the system was designed for? The developer seemed confident that the
      proposed system will meet the project's program and state environmental requirements.

      -- Will the project seek waivers? The answer was "maybe" and not specific. Could there be a disagreement between state Department of Environmental Protection and local standards for
      designing this septic system? Not clear.

      -- Are the proposed septic plans approved by Raytheon? Not yet. Is it possible the septic system could interfere with Raytheon's cleanup? Yes, depending on where it is.

      -- Should the Board require testing in season (next spring) as well? Problematic, because during project construction many monitoring wells will be closed or destroyed and then replaced later as
      needed, another detail requiring Raytheon's approval.

      Hydrogeologist Mark Kelley was asked how accurate his groundwater flow model was. Kelley relied on Raytheon's data, but Raytheon had not accepted the first modeling. While he said they were
      improving, they don't appear to have Raytheon's approval yet. The submittal document indicated the site and septic system design is being reviewed separately by Raytheon and its environmental
      consultants.

      The developer hopes to demolish the existing Raytheon lab building later t<br/><br/>(Message over 64 KB, truncated)
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