Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [waterturtles] Painted Turtle Hatchling

Expand Messages
  • cynynny@webtv.net
    Hi Barry, sorry for the delay in replying. I knew about the clear sides of tanks, they drive torts crazy too. It was a hectic week-end and the hatchling is
    Message 1 of 17 , Oct 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Barry, sorry for the delay in replying. I knew about the clear sides
      of tanks, they drive torts crazy too. It was a hectic week-end and the
      hatchling is still in the temporary set-up. I'm going shopping tomorrow
      for something more permanent. It eats mealworms pretty well and
      poeces of raw fish if cut up small. It has problems with larger pieces
      right now. The size of the snails in my fish tank are miniscule to
      small.....they breed faster than rabbits or mice.
      I'm glad now i didn't kill them off, hopefully the turt will think
      they're gourmet food.
      Cindy

      <<<<Barry wrote: Cindy,
      If you use a clear sided tank cover them on the outside with paper or
      something. Then the turtle wont continually try to get out. Little
      confusing for them. It takes a while for them to adjust. The lighting, I
      say, osram is good and you can get them from a good hardware store. The
      zoo-med 5.0 or higher are excellent but cost more. The compact
      flourescent are good. Now, some disagree about halogen, but it is proven
      by my physics teacher (he has a PhD) that halogen without glass covering
      emits uvb and uva. If you want to test the wavelength you can get a
      spectrum meter and test the bulbs at the store before you get them!!
      Guppies are good, I love em, they clean and get eatin so you can leave
      the turtle without worrying that they┬┤ll starve. Also the ghost shrimp
      are a good buy as well. The get eatin and clean as well. Water lettuce
      is great, just be sure you have a lot of light for it. I can only get it
      to grow outside. I have tried and tried inside, but to no avail. Too
      small to eat snails?? Not if the snails are small. Worms from your yard
      are good. Just use small ones. Crickets, mealworms, small silkworms,
      etc.
      Barry
    • cynynny@webtv.net
      Hi Alex, i didn t know stinkpots were sweet. I m very much aware of the hatchling survival rate, even more aware of the mortality rate of eggs. THere s a (so
      Message 2 of 17 , Oct 2, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Alex, i didn't know stinkpots were sweet.
        I'm very much aware of the hatchling survival rate, even more aware of
        the mortality rate of eggs. THere's a (so far) thriving population of
        painted turtles in the pond near me and over the 6 years i've lived in
        this particular area i've watched females dig nests and lay eggs only to
        find the nests plundered and pillaged the next day. I've only seen one
        hatching who made the mistake of finding a water-filled rut in a path
        the 4-wheelers around here use and couldn't catch the hatchling to move
        it to the pond. I found it dead in a matter of days. I'm sure some
        hatchlings must survive up here but i mostly see full grown turtles.
        That survival rate plus the constant land developement here orries me.
        Sure, painted turtles appear to be abudant but so were box, wood and
        spotted turtles at one time.

        I wasn't aware that all turtles had homing instincts and find that
        really interesting. I know that sea turtles do, but never thought of
        other turtles seeking out the area of their hatching.
        The little one i have came from an area about 30 miles from here and
        knowing the streams and creeks, it could well travel back
        if released and stuck to those waterways and didn't cross roads or get
        captured by a person or become dinner or a predator.....quite a long (
        and dangerous) journey for such a little one.
        Cindy


        <<<Alex wrote: Hi Cindy;
        As the owner of this list, and former keeper of a number of turtles
        (and now a keeper of one sweet Stinkpot), I feel I must weigh in on
        this, and congratulate you on keeping the turtle, for several reasons.
        First, as someone noted, it is too easy to introduce diseases and
        parasites into a population.
        Second, a turtle released in a place far from home will wander,
        trying to get back home, presumably even a hatchling.
        Another concern is genetics. As an example, think of a turtle from,
        say, Ohio. If this turtle is released in Mississippi, its genetics
        will be very different from the local population, and genes that are
        adapted to its home will not work well in its new home. If it passes
        these genes down, it can harm the whole population.
        Also, think about hatchling survivability. 1 in 100 or likely less?
        (Probably far less.) Releasing a hatchling in an area not its home
        will tilt the odds even worse.
        Next, lets think about Painteds in general. They are in pretty good
        population shape across most of their range, and keeping this one is
        not going to harm the population, figuring in hatchling mortality and
        all. However, keeping it, as you are, for educational purposes, has
        the capability to save many adult turtles, since people will have an
        appreciation for them having been exposed to this little Ambassador.
        Turtles are one of those creatures that have a rotten survivability
        rate at the beginning of life, but when grown have a very high rate
        of survivorship. Survival of the old breeders is very important, so
        you can see that every person this turtle touches (or who touches
        her) can have a marked impact on turtle populations in general, far
        greater than she might have as a hatchling released back into the
        wild with the attendant chance of being eaten.
        I hope she has a long and fruitful life as an ambassador for her
        people.
        Alex Netherton
      • Barry Rickard
        Cindy, In reguards to your reply to Alex. If you see them digging nest you could place chicken wire over the nest site to keep the predetors out. I don t know
        Message 3 of 17 , Oct 2, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Cindy,
          In reguards to your reply to Alex. If you see them digging nest you could
          place chicken wire over the nest site to keep the predetors out.
          I don't know if your local laws prohibit such activities, but if I saw egg
          laying I would mark the spot and cover it to keep the predetors out.
          Just a thought.
          Barry

          >From: cynynny@...
          >Reply-To: waterturtles@yahoogroups.com
          >To: waterturtles@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [waterturtles] Re: Painted Turtle Hatchling
          >Date: Mon, 2 Oct 2006 11:12:31 -0400
          >
          >Hi Alex, i didn't know stinkpots were sweet.
          >I'm very much aware of the hatchling survival rate, even more aware of
          >the mortality rate of eggs. THere's a (so far) thriving population of
          >painted turtles in the pond near me and over the 6 years i've lived in
          >this particular area i've watched females dig nests and lay eggs only to
          >find the nests plundered and pillaged the next day. I've only seen one
          >hatching who made the mistake of finding a water-filled rut in a path
          >the 4-wheelers around here use and couldn't catch the hatchling to move
          >it to the pond. I found it dead in a matter of days. I'm sure some
          >hatchlings must survive up here but i mostly see full grown turtles.
          >That survival rate plus the constant land developement here orries me.
          >Sure, painted turtles appear to be abudant but so were box, wood and
          >spotted turtles at one time.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.