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Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

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  • the_goldy_gopher
    Thank you for the advice. I found this web-page and will be giving it a try. http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/ Jeff and Gunther
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 1 7:36 AM
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      Thank you for the advice.

      I found this web-page and will be giving it a try.
      http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/

      Jeff and Gunther

      --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Charles E Johnson Sr" <cejohnsonsr@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Jeff & Gunther. Welcome to amateur astronomy. Your reflector probably needs to be collimated. That is the process of aligning the primary mirror with the diagonal secondary mirror. There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the tube. Probably 3 locking screws too. If you Google "collimation" you'll get lots of better explanations than I can give here. Star collimation will give the best results. There are tools to help you get in the ballpark but a star is the best & in the end you have to use a star to get it just right anyway. You might also check to see if your focuser has an extension tube. My 6" reflector has a very long travel but needs an extension anyway. Without the extension my eyepieces are just too close to the secondary to focus properly. Hope this helps. Have fun! Ed
      > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
      >
    • the_goldy_gopher
      After following the instructions on the http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/ and still having the same issue, I purchased a Laser Collimeter.
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 7 5:02 PM
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        After following the instructions on the http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/ and still having the same issue, I purchased a Laser Collimeter. After a couple of hours of playing I still had the same problem. The focus needs to be in a tad tighter than a focus the eye piece.

        I should be more accurate, I can focus on intermediate ranged items (say 200 yards to a couple of KM away) at one maybe two minor clicks in from the closet setting, but once I get more than a couple of miles away I can't focus on them "cleanly" as I can't get the eye piece in close enough. I get decent fairly round donuts if I start pulling the eyepiece away so I think everything is line up properly.

        Thanks in advance...
        Jeff

        --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you for the advice.
        >
        > I found this web-page and will be giving it a try.
        > http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/
        >
        > Jeff and Gunther
        >
        > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Charles E Johnson Sr" <cejohnsonsr@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello Jeff & Gunther. Welcome to amateur astronomy. Your reflector probably needs to be collimated. That is the process of aligning the primary mirror with the diagonal secondary mirror. There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the tube. Probably 3 locking screws too. If you Google "collimation" you'll get lots of better explanations than I can give here. Star collimation will give the best results. There are tools to help you get in the ballpark but a star is the best & in the end you have to use a star to get it just right anyway. You might also check to see if your focuser has an extension tube. My 6" reflector has a very long travel but needs an extension anyway. Without the extension my eyepieces are just too close to the secondary to focus properly. Hope this helps. Have fun! Ed
        > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
        > >
        >
      • Ali Khan
        Can you consider shortening the focussing barrel by 10mm ?
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 7 6:10 PM
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          Can you consider shortening the focussing barrel by 10mm ?

          --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
          >
          > After following the instructions on the http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/ and still having the same issue, I purchased a Laser Collimeter. After a couple of hours of playing I still had the same problem. The focus needs to be in a tad tighter than a focus the eye piece.
          >
          > I should be more accurate, I can focus on intermediate ranged items (say 200 yards to a couple of KM away) at one maybe two minor clicks in from the closet setting, but once I get more than a couple of miles away I can't focus on them "cleanly" as I can't get the eye piece in close enough. I get decent fairly round donuts if I start pulling the eyepiece away so I think everything is line up properly.
          >
          > Thanks in advance...
          > Jeff
          >
          > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Thank you for the advice.
          > >
          > > I found this web-page and will be giving it a try.
          > > http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/
          > >
          > > Jeff and Gunther
          > >
          > > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Charles E Johnson Sr" <cejohnsonsr@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hello Jeff & Gunther. Welcome to amateur astronomy. Your reflector probably needs to be collimated. That is the process of aligning the primary mirror with the diagonal secondary mirror. There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the tube. Probably 3 locking screws too. If you Google "collimation" you'll get lots of better explanations than I can give here. Star collimation will give the best results. There are tools to help you get in the ballpark but a star is the best & in the end you have to use a star to get it just right anyway. You might also check to see if your focuser has an extension tube. My 6" reflector has a very long travel but needs an extension anyway. Without the extension my eyepieces are just too close to the secondary to focus properly. Hope this helps. Have fun! Ed
          > > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Charles E Johnson Sr
          Hi Jeff. What kind of telescope do you have? Let s start at the beginning & I m sure we ll figure it out. Ed Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From:
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 8 6:29 AM
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            Hi Jeff. What kind of telescope do you have? Let's start at the beginning & I'm sure we'll figure it out.

            Ed

            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


            From: "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...>
            Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2010 00:02:07 -0000
            To: <wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

             

            After following the instructions on the http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/ and still having the same issue, I purchased a Laser Collimeter. After a couple of hours of playing I still had the same problem. The focus needs to be in a tad tighter than a focus the eye piece.

            I should be more accurate, I can focus on intermediate ranged items (say 200 yards to a couple of KM away) at one maybe two minor clicks in from the closet setting, but once I get more than a couple of miles away I can't focus on them "cleanly" as I can't get the eye piece in close enough. I get decent fairly round donuts if I start pulling the eyepiece away so I think everything is line up properly.

            Thanks in advance...
            Jeff

            --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you for the advice.
            >
            > I found this web-page and will be giving it a try.
            > http://www.atmpage.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/
            >
            > Jeff and Gunther
            >
            > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Charles E Johnson Sr" <cejohnsonsr@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hello Jeff & Gunther. Welcome to amateur astronomy. Your reflector probably needs to be collimated. That is the process of aligning the primary mirror with the diagonal secondary mirror. There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the tube. Probably 3 locking screws too. If you Google "collimation" you'll get lots of better explanations than I can give here. Star collimation will give the best results. There are tools to help you get in the ballpark but a star is the best & in the end you have to use a star to get it just right anyway. You might also check to see if your focuser has an extension tube. My 6" reflector has a very long travel but needs an extension anyway. Without the extension my eyepieces are just too close to the secondary to focus properly. Hope this helps. Have fun! Ed
            > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
            > >
            >

          • Jeff Johnson
            Bushnell  789612 - 78mm Newtonian Reflector (manufactured circa 1999)   Using Bushnell Factory - 12mm Eyepiece or New - Celestron 20mm Eyepiece, both have
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 8 8:38 AM
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              Bushnell  789612 - 78mm Newtonian Reflector (manufactured circa 1999)

               

              Using Bushnell Factory - 12mm Eyepiece or New - Celestron 20mm Eyepiece, both have the same problem.




              From: Charles E Johnson Sr <cejohnsonsr@...>
              To: wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 8:29:33 AM
              Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

               

              Hi Jeff. What kind of telescope do you have? Let's start at the beginning I'm sure we'll figure it out.

              Ed


            • Charles Johnson Sr
              I can t find anything about that model. If there is an extender on the focuser draw tube, take it off. It should just unscrew. Then use the 20mm eyepiece. Star
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 9 6:03 AM
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                I can't find anything about that model. If there is an extender on the focuser draw tube, take it off. It should just unscrew. Then use the 20mm eyepiece. Star with the draw tube racked all the way out & slowly focus inward on something obvious & large like the moon. Let me know if you can get focused on that.

                Ed

                On 6/8/2010 10:38 AM, Jeff Johnson wrote:
                 
                Bushnell  789612 - 78mm Newtonian Reflector (manufactured circa 1999)

                 

                Using Bushnell Factory - 12mm Eyepiece or New - Celestron 20mm Eyepiece, both have the same problem.




                From: Charles E Johnson Sr <cejohnsonsr@ cableone. net>
                To: wannabeastronomers@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 8:29:33 AM
                Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

                 

                Hi Jeff. What kind of telescope do you have? Let's start at the beginning I'm sure we'll figure it out.

                Ed



              • Charles Johnson Sr
                1 thing I just noticed in your last post was that you re working in the day time. That won t get you very far with a 3 reflector. If you re seeing anything at
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 9 6:09 AM
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                  1 thing I just noticed in your last post was that you're working in the day time. That won't get you very far with a 3" reflector. If you're seeing anything at all even remotely clearly at 1 Km you're doing pretty good. When you look at objects in the night sky you're basically focusing on (or near) infinity. Do as I suggested with the Moon, then try a bright star like Arcturus or Spica. You should see a lot of difference at night.

                  Ed

                  On 6/8/2010 10:38 AM, Jeff Johnson wrote:
                   
                  Bushnell  789612 - 78mm Newtonian Reflector (manufactured circa 1999)

                   

                  Using Bushnell Factory - 12mm Eyepiece or New - Celestron 20mm Eyepiece, both have the same problem.




                  From: Charles E Johnson Sr <cejohnsonsr@ cableone. net>
                  To: wannabeastronomers@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 8:29:33 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

                   

                  Hi Jeff. What kind of telescope do you have? Let's start at the beginning I'm sure we'll figure it out.

                  Ed



                • James Takac
                  ... Hi Charles What the barlow does is to increase the focal legnth of the scope tending to increase magnification. So in that sense you d be right. I d
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 8, 2010
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                    On Tuesday 01 June 2010 08:51:12 Charles E Johnson Sr wrote:
                    > No. That's incorrect. A Newtonian reflector has a primary mirror in the
                    > back (bottom) of the tube & a 45 degree angle mirror which redirects the
                    > light to the focuser& eyepiece. A Schmidt-Newtonian adds a corrector plate
                    > to the front (top) of the tube. A barlow only magnifies the image. It
                    > doesn't help with focus. Ed Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                    Hi Charles

                    What the barlow does is to increase the focal legnth of the scope tending to
                    increase magnification. So in that sense you'd be right. I'd suggest a
                    collimation check as a matter of course for any new scope. Also I'd have to
                    ask what the object was that was being pointed at. If for instance it was a
                    nebula then the image may well appear to be a faint blur in such a small
                    scope even when in focus, i.e. a fuzzy white/grey patch. That'd be perfectly
                    natural for such an object in a small scope

                    James


                    --
                    The fault of others is easily noticed, but that of oneself is difficult to
                    perceive. A man winnows his neighbor's faults like chaff, but his own fault
                    he hides, as a cheat hides the false die from the gambler.

                    Dharmapada
                  • the_goldy_gopher
                    Back for some more advice. My son and I have two telescopes a Reflector and a Refractor, neither is fairly large (3 and 70mm), and I am not statisified with
                    Message 9 of 19 , Oct 9, 2010
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                      Back for some more advice.

                      My son and I have two telescopes a Reflector and a Refractor, neither is fairly large (3" and 70mm), and I am not statisified with performance of either telescope. However I figure the error is more likely between the eyepiece and the ground then the telescopes themselves. Because of poor view conditions this summer on our schedule we have spent as much time star gazing as I would have liked, actually we had maybe half-a-dozen nights due to weather and schedule issues, which is why I haven't ruled operator error.

                      Over the past two nights however we have had spectacular viewing conditions so we spent several hours attempting to scan the heavens.

                      From the manual of the Reflector ****
                      Jupiter--the largest planet in our solar system is spectacular. Most noted features are its dark stripes or bands both above and below its equator. These are the north and south equatorial belts.
                      ****

                      I have had someone explain to me with a Telescope of my size Jupiter should appear similiar to looking at an orange color tennis ball from 20 feet away.

                      However when I look upon what I think is Jupiter (according to an online starchart http://75.151.95.124/sid2/starchart.asp?cmd=South roughtly 150degrees "south" and up 40 degrees) I see a orangish colored speck of light (a very bright star).
                      I'm not discounting I am looking at an incorrect object, I spent a couple hours last night checking out all the objects in the sky in the region around where Jupiter is supposed to be with both Scopes.

                      I'm a totally messing something up?

                      Thanks in advance

                      Jeff and Gunther

                      --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Howdy everyone.
                      >
                      > My son has taken a liking to astronomy so he and I are learning the hobby together.
                    • Stan Brewer
                      Jeff and/or Gunther, At 52 years old, I m very new to this hobby. What I have seen looking at Jupiter can best described as looking at a pencil eraser at
                      Message 10 of 19 , Oct 9, 2010
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                        Jeff and/or Gunther,
                            At 52 years old, I'm very new to this hobby.  What I have seen looking  at Jupiter can best described as looking at a pencil eraser at arms length.  Jupiter is about half that size, is mostly white with a thin black band, I can see 3-4 small stars parrall to that band near Jupiter and I guess they are Jupiters moons.  I watched one appear from behind Jupiter one night.  I assume it was the rising of one of her moons.  I'm using a 76mm f9.2 700mm focal length Reflector with a 6mm eyepiece (sounds like I know what I'm talking about? Not really, I just read it off the scope).  The 12 mm is sharper, but half that size.  I'm wondering why I don't see orange?  My guess is cheap scope, $9.99 at a thrift store.  The brand name is Bushnell.

                                                                                     Stan


                        the_goldy_gopher wrote:
                         

                        Back for some more advice.

                        My son and I have two telescopes a Reflector and a Refractor, neither is fairly large (3" and 70mm), and I am not statisified with performance of either telescope. However I figure the error is more likely between the eyepiece and the ground then the telescopes themselves. Because of poor view conditions this summer on our schedule we have spent as much time star gazing as I would have liked, actually we had maybe half-a-dozen nights due to weather and schedule issues, which is why I haven't ruled operator error.

                        Over the past two nights however we have had spectacular viewing conditions so we spent several hours attempting to scan the heavens.

                        >From the manual of the Reflector ****
                        Jupiter--the largest planet in our solar system is spectacular. Most noted features are its dark stripes or bands both above and below its equator. These are the north and south equatorial belts.
                        ****

                        I have had someone explain to me with a Telescope of my size Jupiter should appear similiar to looking at an orange color tennis ball from 20 feet away.

                        However when I look upon what I think is Jupiter (according to an online starchart http://75.151.95.124/sid2/starchart.asp?cmd=South roughtly 150degrees "south" and up 40 degrees) I see a orangish colored speck of light (a very bright star).
                        I'm not discounting I am looking at an incorrect object, I spent a couple hours last night checking out all the objects in the sky in the region around where Jupiter is supposed to be with both Scopes.

                        I'm a totally messing something up?

                        Thanks in advance

                        Jeff and Gunther

                        --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "the_goldy_gopher" <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Howdy everyone.
                        >
                        > My son has taken a liking to astronomy so he and I are learning the hobby together.

                      • Jeff Johnson
                        We have similiar bushnell telescopes, however when I bought mine it didn t come with any eye pieces so off to my local store and picked up a Celestron eye
                        Message 11 of 19 , Oct 9, 2010
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                          We have similiar bushnell telescopes, however when I bought mine it didn't come with any eye pieces so off to my local store and picked up a Celestron eye piece kit, even on sale it was six times what I spent on the Telescope, yet I figure if I upgrade telescopes I won't need to replace the eye pieces.
                           
                          Using the largest eye piece (32mm) I and  looking at what I think are the planets I get "shades" of color however as I go to smaller eye pieces I lose the color.   Which is why I am assuming I am looking at the planets.   Jupiter has an orangish tint, not bright orange but diffently orangish tint to the speck (I do mean speck).   All of which is driving me nuts.
                           
                          Jeff


                          From: Stan Brewer <brewers@...>
                          To: wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sat, October 9, 2010 6:18:06 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some help.

                           

                          Jeff and/or Gunther,
                              At 52 years old, I'm very new to this hobby.  What I have seen looking  at Jupiter can best described as looking at a pencil eraser at arms length.  Jupiter is about half that size, is mostly white with a thin black band, I can see 3-4 small stars parrall to that band near Jupiter and I guess they are Jupiters moons. 


                        • Jeff Johnson
                          Okay, after much thought, trial and error, and another couple of hours of frustration AND thinking about what I wrote last night, I have discovered my
                          Message 12 of 19 , Oct 10, 2010
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                            Okay, after much thought, trial and error, and another couple of hours of
                            frustration AND thinking about what I wrote last night, I have discovered my
                            issue; the new Celestron eyepieces are the cause of the issue(s) I am having.  
                             Now if someone would explain to me why this is occurring it would be greatly
                            appreciated.
                             
                            When I use the Celestron eyepieces (Plössl) the Telescope cannot focus properly,
                            it is like I need to turn the focus one step closer than what the mechanism
                            allows.   Using the 32mm eye piece I am one small click out, but with the
                            smaller lens (15mm and smaller) I cannot focus the telescope.  

                            Last Night I pulled out the older (cheaper) Bushnell supplied lens that I got
                            when I purchased the refractor and “wow” I could focus.   I was able to see the
                            bands on Jupiter and the four moons.   Tried the Celestron eyepieces and again
                            was not able to focus.   However I lost my “shades” of color with the older
                            lens.  

                             
                            So my question is twofold; why can’t I focus with the new eyepieces from
                            Celestron and why do I get hints or shades of color (without a filter) with a
                            couple of them and not the older Bushnell lens?
                             
                            As a follow up we had decided to upgrade to at least one larger telescope later
                            this year.   I have been looking at some Celestron models at our local store,
                            and the OMNI XLT series has caught my eye.   Does anyone have any experience
                            with the models in this line?  


                            Thanks in advance

                            Jeff and Gunther
                            ________________________________
                            From: Jeff Johnson <the_goldy_gopher@...>
                            To: wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sat, October 9, 2010 7:06:34 PM
                            Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some
                            help.

                             
                            We have similiar bushnell telescopes, however when I bought mine it didn't come
                            with any eye pieces so off to my local store and picked up a Celestron eye piece

                            kit, even on sale it was six times what I spent on the Telescope, yet I figure
                            if I upgrade telescopes I won't need to replace the eye pieces.
                          • starryskyn
                            Your refractor tube and focuser assembly does not have enough back focus (distance from closest focusing position with the focuser travel). The main lens in
                            Message 13 of 19 , Oct 13, 2010
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                              Your refractor tube and focuser assembly does not have enough back focus (distance from closest focusing position with the focuser travel). The main lens in front has a focus position or plane that is inside the focuser tube. The eye lens you bought (no info given beyond "Celestron") has a focal point or plane also. For you to focus the telescope at infinity (the moon, stars, etc), you must make the eye lens travel farther in toward the other end of the whole telescope. The reason the old Bushnell lenses could do this is because they have different design or construction or focal length.
                              Solution: Shorten your telescope. First be sure the upper lens assembly is screwed down tight, so that the lens is close as possible to the back of the scope. If it is, you will have to modify the tube. Detach the back focusing assembly from the tube, mark a ring around the bottom end of the tube about a half inch above the end, and get out your hacksaw. I am guessing all you need is that half inch difference. Be sure you get all the filings and dust out of the tube after you cut.
                              After you shorten that tube, you will assemble the focuser to the back again (be sure all is in a straight line, of course). Now your new good eye lenses will work with your scope.

                              --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Johnson <the_goldy_gopher@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Okay, after much thought, trial and error, and another couple of hours of
                              > frustration AND thinking about what I wrote last night, I have discovered my
                              > issue; the new Celestron eyepieces are the cause of the issue(s) I am having.  
                              >  Now if someone would explain to me why this is occurring it would be greatly
                              > appreciated.
                              >  
                              > When I use the Celestron eyepieces (Plössl) the Telescope cannot focus properly,
                              > it is like I need to turn the focus one step closer than what the mechanism
                              > allows.   Using the 32mm eye piece I am one small click out, but with the
                              > smaller lens (15mm and smaller) I cannot focus the telescope.  
                              >
                              > Last Night I pulled out the older (cheaper) Bushnell supplied lens that I got
                              > when I purchased the refractor and “wow” I could focus.   I was able to see the
                              > bands on Jupiter and the four moons.   Tried the Celestron eyepieces and again
                              > was not able to focus.   However I lost my “shades” of color with the older
                              > lens.  
                              >
                              >  
                              > So my question is twofold; why can’t I focus with the new eyepieces from
                              > Celestron and why do I get hints or shades of color (without a filter) with a
                              > couple of them and not the older Bushnell lens?
                              >  
                              > As a follow up we had decided to upgrade to at least one larger telescope later
                              > this year.   I have been looking at some Celestron models at our local store,
                              > and the OMNI XLT series has caught my eye.   Does anyone have any experience
                              > with the models in this line?  
                              >
                              >
                              > Thanks in advance
                              >
                              > Jeff and Gunther
                              > ________________________________
                              > From: Jeff Johnson <the_goldy_gopher@...>
                              > To: wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Sat, October 9, 2010 7:06:34 PM
                              > Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] Re: New to the hobby and looking for some
                              > help.
                              >
                              >  
                              > We have similiar bushnell telescopes, however when I bought mine it didn't come
                              > with any eye pieces so off to my local store and picked up a Celestron eye piece
                              >
                              > kit, even on sale it was six times what I spent on the Telescope, yet I figure
                              > if I upgrade telescopes I won't need to replace the eye pieces.
                              >
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