Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] New to group

Expand Messages
  • Victoria Walters
    Thanks Carol! North Bay, huh? I m in Central Cal...a little south of Fresno. I have been watching Mars over the past couple of weeks...and can find a few of
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks Carol!
       
      North Bay, huh?  I'm in Central Cal...a little south of Fresno.
       
      I have been watching Mars over the past couple of weeks...and can find a few of the constellations on my own.  Yes, looking at the sky is much more fun than reading the books - hehehe.
       
      Vicky

      Carol Widger <c.twig@...> wrote:
      Hi Vicky!
       
      "  I'm in Pacific Time Zone (California.)"
       
      Me too, in the SF North Bay area!
       
       
      "11/2   New Moon (lunation 1025) occurs at 1:25;
       
      The new moon occurs at 1:25. then starts waxing (getting bigger) In a few days, you will see a sliver .
       
       the asteroid 3 Juno is stationary at 20:00"

      Someone else should help as to where you'd find it. , Stationary means its not going anywhere, apparent (to the eyes).

      Even when I 'think' I understand what is being said, seeing these things in writing makes my brain spin - and I've always believed myself to be a somewhat intelligent woman...

      Get out of the books, and go look at the sky!
      Pick out one small area, maybe a group of constellations, cruise it, and make notes on a map. Go back in later and look them up. Tonight, Try Taurus and Aries- The Pleaides, Haiades, note where you see double stars, or little blobs, and find out later what you were looking at. Note the color of the stars, Look up their names.
      Look at Mars!
      Then go back to the books and learn what you were looking at.

      I was introduced to this last May, and since then I've seen some amazing things through binoculars and telescopes that make me want to learn more.  Unfortunately, my 'teacher' lives near Atlanta, GA - and even though he tries, it's hard to accurately describe what I'm looking at over the phone well enough for him to tell me what it is I'm actually seeing when he's looking at a three-hours older sky.
       
      The Sky is the same. Just look farther to the east, and have star map handy. Have him pick out something overhead, and you can see it in the east. I.e. if He's watching Mars this week, it will be in the zenith(directly overhead) at midnight.At 9 PST it will be about halfway up in the east Aries.
       
      Cheerio and clear skies tonight!
      Carol
       

       


       
      Follow the Cloud
       

      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com

    • Victoria Walters
      Thanks Jeff, So, when it reads New Moon (lunation 1025) is the 1025 refering to 10/25? I will purchase the book you recommended - and do so via the link to
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Jeff,
         
        So, when it reads "New Moon (lunation 1025)" is the 1025 refering to 10/25?

         

        I will purchase the book you recommended - and do so via the link to Amazon you suggested.

         

        Vicky



        Jeff Tibb <jefftibb@...> wrote:
        Vicky,

        These times are all listed as Universal Time or UT. That is the time
        in Greenwich, England and you will have to adjust each reading to
        match your local time.

        I live in the Central Time Zone and I need to subtract 6 hours from
        Universal to have the events match up with Central Standard Time.
        During Daylight Savings Time, I only need to subtract 5 hours.

        You will of course now need to subtract eight hours and seven during
        PDT. Remember that the event will occur one calendar day earlier for
        you as well if it happens at a time less than 8:00 UT. So keep the
        date straight too.

        A lunation is that moment in time when a true 'New Moon' occurs. The
        Moon goes from shrinking in size (old moon) to all dark at this hour.
        It is of course too close to the Sun looking from the Earth for us to
        see it at all at this time.

        This will occur at 10:25 UT - so for you it will be 2:25AM.

        Juno will 'stand still' means that the Earth will 'catch up' to Juno
        in its orbit and pass it at this time. For Earth based observers this
        means that Juno will be exactly opposite the Sun in the sky att hat
        time. It will rise at sun set and set at sun rise.

        It also will appear to more backward in its path over a few weeks as
        we pass it relative to the stars behind it. This is
        called 'retrograde motion' and is due to how much closer to the Earth
        it is than the stars and as we pass it, it will appear to change
        direction but that is just due to our position being in motion as it
        Juno's.

        And what Carol said: Look into some books. One I always recommend
        is "40 Nights To Knowing the Sky" by Fred Schapf.

        OH, let me plug the AAVSO now. This great professional - amateur
        astronomical society has done great research for 100 years now and
        you can help them by linking to anything you buy from Amazon.Com by
        first going through their link. That gives AAVSO 5% of the proceeds
        to continue their work.

        Link here:
        http://www.aavso.org/aavso/support/amazon.shtml

        Click the link and simply shop on Amazon as you normally would. All
        prices remain the same and you get to help scientific research at the
        same time...

        Jeff



        --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, Victoria Walters
        <vikilee2004@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Carol!

        > So, in light of that - would you interpret the first entry on the
        November Astronomy Calendar?  I'm in Pacific Time Zone (California.)

        > "11/2   New Moon (lunation 1025) occurs at 1:25; the asteroid 3
        Juno is stationary at 20:00"
        >

        >
        > Even when I 'think' I understand what is being said, seeing these
        things in writing makes my brain spin - and I've always believed
        myself to be a somewhat intelligent woman...
        >
        > I was introduced to this last May, and since then I've seen some
        amazing things through binoculars and telescopes that make me want to
        learn more.  Unfortunately, my 'teacher' lives near Atlanta, GA - and
        even though he tries, it's hard to accurately describe what I'm
        looking at over the phone well enough for him to tell me what it is
        I'm actually seeing when he's looking at a three-hours older sky.

        > Vicky
        >
        > Carol Widger <c.twig@v...> wrote:
        > Hi Vickie!

        > You can't learn if you don't ask questions!

        > Such as: How do you read an Astronomy Calendar? What is UT time?
        >

        > UT is universal time, the time in Greenwich observatory , in
        England. If you live in the States, subtract 5 hours for EST, 6 hours
        for CST, 7 hours for MST, and 8 hours for PST.

        > To get a good star map for your time and location, go to

        http://www.heavens-above.com/

        > Register, plug in your location, and there it is. You can even set
        it for a time or date in the future, to plan ahead for an evening...
        > Once you register, you can set it to remember you. I have found
        this site very valuable, especially when the weather is iffy, and the
        viewing window is short. Grab a map and run!

        > If you have a Palm, or other PDA, there are simple starmaps to
        download that are very helpful....


        > Don't forget to look up at midnight! Mars will be at opposition
        tonight, and straight overhead. Get out the scope or binoculars, and
        have a party!
        > Hope that helps!

        > Carol

        > 38.11N, 122.57W


        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        > Science kits Science education Astronomy gift Astronomy magazine
        Astronomy telescope Astronomy star name
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        >     Visit your group "wannabeastronomers" on the web.
        >  
        >     To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        >  wannabeastronomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >  
        >     Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        > Follow the Cloud

        >
        >
        >
        >
        >            
        > ---------------------------------
        >  Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.
        >






         
        Follow the Cloud
         


        Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.

      • Jeff Tibb
        Thanks for supporting AAVSO! I buy all my books and DVD s through that link now. The 1025 refers to 10:25 AM - Universal Time I believe as the New Moon happens
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for supporting AAVSO! I buy all my books and
          DVD's through that link now.

          The 1025 refers to 10:25 AM - Universal Time I believe
          as the New Moon happens today.

          So subtract 8 hours from that and you will have your
          local (PST) time of 2:25AM.



          --- Victoria Walters <vikilee2004@...> wrote:

          > Thanks Jeff,
          >
          > So, when it reads "New Moon (lunation 1025)" is the
          > 1025 refering to 10/25?
          >
          >
          >
          > I will purchase the book you recommended - and do so
          > via the link to Amazon you suggested.
          >
          >
          >
          > Vicky
          >
          >
          > Jeff Tibb <jefftibb@...> wrote:
          > Vicky,
          >
          > These times are all listed as Universal Time or UT.
          > That is the time
          > in Greenwich, England and you will have to adjust
          > each reading to
          > match your local time.
          >
          > I live in the Central Time Zone and I need to
          > subtract 6 hours from
          > Universal to have the events match up with Central
          > Standard Time.
          > During Daylight Savings Time, I only need to
          > subtract 5 hours.
          >
          > You will of course now need to subtract eight hours
          > and seven during
          > PDT. Remember that the event will occur one calendar
          > day earlier for
          > you as well if it happens at a time less than 8:00
          > UT. So keep the
          > date straight too.
          >
          > A lunation is that moment in time when a true 'New
          > Moon' occurs. The
          > Moon goes from shrinking in size (old moon) to all
          > dark at this hour.
          > It is of course too close to the Sun looking from
          > the Earth for us to
          > see it at all at this time.
          >
          > This will occur at 10:25 UT - so for you it will be
          > 2:25AM.
          >
          > Juno will 'stand still' means that the Earth will
          > 'catch up' to Juno
          > in its orbit and pass it at this time. For Earth
          > based observers this
          > means that Juno will be exactly opposite the Sun in
          > the sky att hat
          > time. It will rise at sun set and set at sun rise.
          >
          > It also will appear to more backward in its path
          > over a few weeks as
          > we pass it relative to the stars behind it. This is
          > called 'retrograde motion' and is due to how much
          > closer to the Earth
          > it is than the stars and as we pass it, it will
          > appear to change
          > direction but that is just due to our position being
          > in motion as it
          > Juno's.
          >
          > And what Carol said: Look into some books. One I
          > always recommend
          > is "40 Nights To Knowing the Sky" by Fred Schapf.
          >
          > OH, let me plug the AAVSO now. This great
          > professional - amateur
          > astronomical society has done great research for 100
          > years now and
          > you can help them by linking to anything you buy
          > from Amazon.Com by
          > first going through their link. That gives AAVSO 5%
          > of the proceeds
          > to continue their work.
          >
          > Link here:
          > http://www.aavso.org/aavso/support/amazon.shtml
          >
          > Click the link and simply shop on Amazon as you
          > normally would. All
          > prices remain the same and you get to help
          > scientific research at the
          > same time...
          >
          > Jeff
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, Victoria
          > Walters
          > <vikilee2004@y...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Thanks Carol!
          > >
          > > So, in light of that - would you interpret the
          > first entry on the
          > November Astronomy Calendar? I'm in Pacific Time
          > Zone (California.)
          > >
          > > "11/2 New Moon (lunation 1025) occurs at 1:25;
          > the asteroid 3
          > Juno is stationary at 20:00"
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Even when I 'think' I understand what is being
          > said, seeing these
          > things in writing makes my brain spin - and I've
          > always believed
          > myself to be a somewhat intelligent woman...
          > >
          > > I was introduced to this last May, and since then
          > I've seen some
          > amazing things through binoculars and telescopes
          > that make me want to
          > learn more. Unfortunately, my 'teacher' lives near
          > Atlanta, GA - and
          > even though he tries, it's hard to accurately
          > describe what I'm
          > looking at over the phone well enough for him to
          > tell me what it is
          > I'm actually seeing when he's looking at a
          > three-hours older sky.
          > >
          > > Vicky
          > >
          > > Carol Widger <c.twig@v...> wrote:
          > > Hi Vickie!
          > >
          > > You can't learn if you don't ask questions!
          > >
          > > Such as: How do you read an Astronomy Calendar?
          > What is UT time?
          > >
          > >
          > > UT is universal time, the time in Greenwich
          > observatory , in
          > England. If you live in the States, subtract 5 hours
          > for EST, 6 hours
          > for CST, 7 hours for MST, and 8 hours for PST.
          > >
          > > To get a good star map for your time and location,
          > go to
          > >
          > > http://www.heavens-above.com/
          > >
          > > Register, plug in your location, and there it is.
          > You can even set
          > it for a time or date in the future, to plan ahead
          > for an evening...
          > > Once you register, you can set it to remember you.
          > I have found
          > this site very valuable, especially when the weather
          > is iffy, and the
          > viewing window is short. Grab a map and run!
          > >
          > > If you have a Palm, or other PDA, there are simple
          > starmaps to
          > download that are very helpful....
          > >
          > >
          > > Don't forget to look up at midnight! Mars will be
          > at opposition
          > tonight, and straight overhead. Get out the scope or
          > binoculars, and
          > have a party!
          > > Hope that helps!
          > >
          > > Carol
          > >
          > > 38.11N, 122.57W
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > SPONSORED LINKS
          > > Science kits Science education Astronomy gift
          > Astronomy magazine
          > Astronomy telescope Astronomy star name
          > >
          > > ---------------------------------
          > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          > >
          > >
          > > Visit your group "wannabeastronomers" on the
          > web.
          > >
          > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
          > to:
          > > wannabeastronomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
          > Yahoo! Terms of
          >
          === message truncated ===
        • Dave Adalian
          Oh! That s why I recognized your name... Guess the Halloween candy is making me a little slow on the uptake. -- Dave
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Oh!  That's why I recognized your name...  Guess the Halloween candy is making me a little slow on the uptake.
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 7:52 AM
            Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] New to group

            Thanks Carol!
             
            North Bay, huh?  I'm in Central Cal...a little south of Fresno.
             
            I have been watching Mars over the past couple of weeks...and can find a few of the constellations on my own.  Yes, looking at the sky is much more fun than reading the books - hehehe.
             
            Vicky

            Carol Widger <c.twig@...> wrote:
            Hi Vicky!
             
            "  I'm in Pacific Time Zone (California.)"
             
            Me too, in the SF North Bay area!
             
             
            "11/2   New Moon (lunation 1025) occurs at 1:25;
             
            The new moon occurs at 1:25. then starts waxing (getting bigger) In a few days, you will see a sliver .
             
             the asteroid 3 Juno is stationary at 20:00"

            Someone else should help as to where you'd find it. , Stationary means its not going anywhere, apparent (to the eyes).

            Even when I 'think' I understand what is being said, seeing these things in writing makes my brain spin - and I've always believed myself to be a somewhat intelligent woman...

            Get out of the books, and go look at the sky!
            Pick out one small area, maybe a group of constellations, cruise it, and make notes on a map. Go back in later and look them up. Tonight, Try Taurus and Aries- The Pleaides, Haiades, note where you see double stars, or little blobs, and find out later what you were looking at. Note the color of the stars, Look up their names.
            Look at Mars!
            Then go back to the books and learn what you were looking at.

            I was introduced to this last May, and since then I've seen some amazing things through binoculars and telescopes that make me want to learn more.  Unfortunately, my 'teacher' lives near Atlanta, GA - and even though he tries, it's hard to accurately describe what I'm looking at over the phone well enough for him to tell me what it is I'm actually seeing when he's looking at a three-hours older sky.
             
            The Sky is the same. Just look farther to the east, and have star map handy. Have him pick out something overhead, and you can see it in the east. I.e. if He's watching Mars this week, it will be in the zenith(directly overhead) at midnight.At 9 PST it will be about halfway up in the east Aries.
             
            Cheerio and clear skies tonight!
            Carol
             

             


             
            Follow the Cloud
             

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com

          • Victoria Walters
            Hi Dave! I didn t realize you were part of this group. Butch suggested that I look for astronomy interest groups on Yahoo...I did...and found this one to
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 1, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Dave!  I didn't realize you were part of this group.  Butch suggested that I look for astronomy interest groups on Yahoo...I did...and found this one to join.
               
              Vicky


              Dave Adalian <dpalta@...> wrote:
              Oh!  That's why I recognized your name...  Guess the Halloween candy is making me a little slow on the uptake.
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 7:52 AM
              Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] New to group

              Thanks Carol!
               
              North Bay, huh?  I'm in Central Cal...a little south of Fresno.
               
              I have been watching Mars over the past couple of weeks...and can find a few of the constellations on my own.  Yes, looking at the sky is much more fun than reading the books - hehehe.
               
              Vicky

              Carol Widger <c.twig@...> wrote:
              Hi Vicky!
               
              "  I'm in Pacific Time Zone (California.)"
               
              Me too, in the SF North Bay area!
               
               
              "11/2   New Moon (lunation 1025) occurs at 1:25;
               
              The new moon occurs at 1:25. then starts waxing (getting bigger) In a few days, you will see a sliver .
               
               the asteroid 3 Juno is stationary at 20:00"

              Someone else should help as to where you'd find it. , Stationary means its not going anywhere, apparent (to the eyes).

              Even when I 'think' I understand what is being said, seeing these things in writing makes my brain spin - and I've always believed myself to be a somewhat intelligent woman...

              Get out of the books, and go look at the sky!
              Pick out one small area, maybe a group of constellations, cruise it, and make notes on a map. Go back in later and look them up. Tonight, Try Taurus and Aries- The Pleaides, Haiades, note where you see double stars, or little blobs, and find out later what you were looking at. Note the color of the stars, Look up their names.
              Look at Mars!
              Then go back to the books and learn what you were looking at.

              I was introduced to this last May, and since then I've seen some amazing things through binoculars and telescopes that make me want to learn more.  Unfortunately, my 'teacher' lives near Atlanta, GA - and even though he tries, it's hard to accurately describe what I'm looking at over the phone well enough for him to tell me what it is I'm actually seeing when he's looking at a three-hours older sky.
               
              The Sky is the same. Just look farther to the east, and have star map handy. Have him pick out something overhead, and you can see it in the east. I.e. if He's watching Mars this week, it will be in the zenith(directly overhead) at midnight.At 9 PST it will be about halfway up in the east Aries.
               
              Cheerio and clear skies tonight!
              Carol
               

               


               
              Follow the Cloud
               

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com



               
              Follow the Cloud
               


              Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.

            • quintaxica
              Hey, I m just north of Fresno. Know of good places to get astronomy fixes and equipment, and gatherings?
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 6, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Hey, I'm just north of Fresno.

                Know of good places to get astronomy fixes and equipment, and gatherings?
              • Victoria Walters
                A recent Internet search led me to a group in Tulare, which is south of where I am...and even further south from you. ... gatherings?
                Message 7 of 19 , Nov 7, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  A recent Internet search led me to a group in Tulare, which is south
                  of where I am...and even further south from you.

                  --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "quintaxica"
                  <kinetica@e...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hey, I'm just north of Fresno.
                  >
                  > Know of good places to get astronomy fixes and equipment, and
                  gatherings?
                  >
                • Jeff Tibb
                  The Sky & Telescope website has an active directory of clubs nationwide. You can also make contact with the Astronomical League which is the parent
                  Message 8 of 19 , Nov 7, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The Sky & Telescope website has an active directory of
                    clubs nationwide.

                    You can also make contact with the Astronomical League
                    which is the parent organization for most clubs and
                    they too can steer you in the right direction.

                    I strongly encourage anyone who is interested in
                    astronomy to visit with your local 'real life'
                    astronomy club. They are usually very friendly and
                    knowledgable and can help you get started in the right
                    way. (ie. Don't spend a lot of money right away! Visit
                    with folks who know things first.)



                    --- Victoria Walters <vikilee2004@...> wrote:

                    > A recent Internet search led me to a group in
                    > Tulare, which is south
                    > of where I am...and even further south from you.
                    >
                    > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com,
                    > "quintaxica"
                    > <kinetica@e...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hey, I'm just north of Fresno.
                    > >
                    > > Know of good places to get astronomy fixes and
                    > equipment, and
                    > gatherings?
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Dave Adalian
                    For Fresno astronomy gatherings, try this: http://www.cvafresno.org/ -- Dave http://starry-starry-nights.blogspot.com/ ... From: Victoria Walters To:
                    Message 9 of 19 , Nov 7, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      For Fresno astronomy gatherings, try this:
                       
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Monday, November 07, 2005 6:51 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Wanna be Astronomers] New to group

                      A recent Internet search led me to a group in Tulare, which is south
                      of where I am...and even further south from you.

                      --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "quintaxica"
                      <kinetica@e...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hey, I'm just north of Fresno.
                      >
                      > Know of good places to get astronomy fixes and equipment, and
                      gatherings?
                      >





                    • douglaswheelock@ymail.com
                      Hi all, My name is Doug and live in Nottinghamshire UK, have had an interest in astronomy for many years but have never done anything about it until now.
                      Message 10 of 19 , Feb 5, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi all,
                        My name is Doug and live in Nottinghamshire UK, have had an interest in astronomy for many years but have never done anything about it until now. Recently purchased a basic telescope 50mm with 500mm focal range, starting off with basic equipment until i gain more experience and then will invest in better upgrade or put an offer in for hubble. Anyway thats the intro over with and look forward to taking part in the group..
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.