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The Milky Way Galaxy

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  • sylviagillion92
    can someone help me with describing the overall structure of the milky way galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from another.
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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      can someone help me with describing the overall structure of the
      milky way galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from
      another.
    • sylvia gillion
      Please help with describing the overall structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from one another. ... Do you Yahoo!? All
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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        Please help with describing the overall structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from one another.


        Do you Yahoo!?
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      • Jeff Tibb
        Is this a school assignment? ... Yahoo!
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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          Is this a school assignment?


          --- sylvia gillion <sylviagillion92@...> wrote:

          > Please help with describing the overall structure of
          > the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various
          > regions differ from one another.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > All your favorites on one personal page � Try My
          Yahoo!
        • Haroldo Val de Lobo
          Hi! The Galaxy: Gas and dust held together by gravity to form a disk galaxy some 30 kiloparsecs (1 Parsec = 3,26 ly) across surrounded by a halo of visible
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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            Hi!
            The Galaxy: "Gas and dust held together by gravity to form a disk galaxy some 30 kiloparsecs (1 Parsec = 3,26 ly) across surrounded by a halo of visible globular clusters, and embedded in a much more extensive halo of dark matter. The word "Galaxy" actually comes from the Greek for "Milky Way". Although it is 30 kiloparsecs across (with the sun about 9 kiloparsecs out from the centre), the disk of our Galaxy is only about 300 Parsecs thick in its outer regions.
            As in other disc galaxies, at the centre of our Galaxy there is a bulge of stars resembling a small elliptical galaxy, this bulge is about 7 kiloparsecs across and 1 kiloparsec thick. The Sun is movingat about 250 km/sec in its orbit and takes roughly 225 million years to travel once around the Galaxy (the cosmic year), the overall mass of the Galaxy (due to the studies of the way in which the stars move, indicating the nature of the gravitational field as a whole) : 1,000 billion times the mass of our Sun, roughly 10 times the mass of all the stars of the Milky Way put together. A strong evidence for the existence of dark matter in our Galaxy.
            (Companion to the Cosmos, by John Gribbin, pgs 157, 158.)
             
             
             
             
             
             
             


            Jeff Tibb <jefftibb@...> wrote:

            Is this a school assignment?


            --- sylvia gillion wrote:

            > Please help with describing the overall structure of
            > the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various
            > regions differ from one another.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > All your favorites on one personal page – Try My
            Yahoo!



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          • Gregg
            *Center of galaxy--a black hole with mass of several million suns. It is behind the constellation Sagittarius and its clouds of stars and thick gas and dust.
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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              *Center of galaxy--a black hole with mass of several million suns.
              It is behind the constellation Sagittarius and its clouds of stars
              and thick gas and dust. It can only be indirectly detected by X-ray
              and infrared sensors in spacecraft.
              *Central bulge--is slightly elongated, with a very short "bar",
              making it in the class of "barred spiral" in the Hubble
              classification scheme.
              *Halo of galactic star clusters--there are several hundred clusters
              of stars of varying densities and sizes in orbits around the center
              of mass of the galaxy.
              *Spiral arms of stars--these structures span thousands of lightyears
              out to far beyond what is visually detectable. Photos of other
              spiral galaxy neighbors show extensions two to three times broader
              than had been known earlier. The spiral feature is believed to be
              a "pressure wave" phenomenon. The arms are not coiling or uncoiling
              as the galaxy rotates, but are compression and extension of spaces
              between stars that independently rotate about the center of the
              galaxy. There is indication of hot blue younger stars being formed
              close to or within these arms, as well as many supernova and nova
              remnants that new stars could be made from.
              *Gas and dust clouds--Included in the arms along with stars is much
              interstellar gas and dust particles. These are left from the
              formation of the galaxy and the explosions of unstable stars in
              previous eons. The density is very low, about one atom of hydrogen
              gas per cc, and dust particles finer than smoke at even thinner
              distribution. It is only because of the great spreads of distance
              that these clouds block the view through them.
              *Dark Matter--It can be infered rather than directly detected. By
              the gravitational influence exerted upon visible stars rotating about
              the galaxy's center, it is thought that a very large cloud of cool
              gases and dust surrounds the whole galaxy. This mass is several
              times larger than the mass of the visible matter. Some have looked
              for dark matter in various forms-white dwarf stars, neutron stars,
              brown dwarfs, planets, black holes, MACHOs (MAssive Compact Halo
              Objects), WIMPs (Weakly Interactive Massive Particles), cold gas and
              dust.
              *Companion galaxies--several small, faint galaxies float along with
              the Large and Small Magellenic Clouds around the Milky Way. The last
              two are fairly massive irregular galaxies that may have collided in
              the far past with our galaxy. In the far future, they may be
              absorbed into the main body.
              *Nearby neighbors--the Local Group of galaxies has a couple dozen
              members. The Milky Way and the Great Spiral Galaxy (Nebula before)
              in Andromeda are the largest members. The Local Group is a member of
              an even larger "super cluster" of many thousands of galaxies.
              Modern cosmology has a theory of uneven distribution of galaxies
              throughout the universe. Many millions of galaxies form "walls"
              or "shells" of matter around relatively empty "bubbles" that are
              millions of lightyears across.

              --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, sylvia gillion
              <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
              > Please help with describing the overall structure of the Milky Way
              Galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from one another.
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > All your favorites on one personal page – Try My Yahoo!
            • Haroldo Val de Lobo
              A seed works wonders, let s unveil Isis! Gregg wrote: *Center of galaxy--a black hole with mass of several million suns. It is behind
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 28, 2004
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                A seed works wonders, let's unveil Isis!

                Gregg <starryskyn@...> wrote:


                *Center of galaxy--a black hole with mass of several million suns.
                It is behind the constellation Sagittarius and its clouds of stars
                and thick gas and dust. It can only be indirectly detected by X-ray
                and infrared sensors in spacecraft.
                *Central bulge--is slightly elongated, with a very short "bar",
                making it in the class of "barred spiral" in the Hubble
                classification scheme.
                *Halo of galactic star clusters--there are several hundred clusters
                of stars of varying densities and sizes in orbits around the center
                of mass of the galaxy.
                *Spiral arms of stars--these structures span thousands of lightyears
                out to far beyond what is visually detectable. Photos of other
                spiral galaxy neighbors show extensions two to three times broader
                than had been known earlier. The spiral feature is believed to be
                a "pressure wave" phenomenon. The arms are not coiling or uncoiling
                as the galaxy rotates, but are compression and extension of spaces
                between stars that independently rotate about the center of the
                galaxy. There is indication of hot blue younger stars being formed
                close to or within these arms, as well as many supernova and nova
                remnants that new stars could be made from.
                *Gas and dust clouds--Included in the arms along with stars is much
                interstellar gas and dust particles. These are left from the
                formation of the galaxy and the explosions of unstable stars in
                previous eons. The density is very low, about one atom of hydrogen
                gas per cc, and dust particles finer than smoke at even thinner
                distribution. It is only because of the great spreads of distance
                that these clouds block the view through them.
                *Dark Matter--It can be infered rather than directly detected. By
                the gravitational influence exerted upon visible stars rotating about
                the galaxy's center, it is thought that a very large cloud of cool
                gases and dust surrounds the whole galaxy. This mass is several
                times larger than the mass of the visible matter. Some have looked
                for dark matter in various forms-white dwarf stars, neutron stars,
                brown dwarfs, planets, black holes, MACHOs (MAssive Compact Halo
                Objects), WIMPs (Weakly Interactive Massive Particles), cold gas and
                dust.
                *Companion galaxies--several small, faint galaxies float along with
                the Large and Small Magellenic Clouds around the Milky Way. The last
                two are fairly massive irregular galaxies that may have collided in
                the far past with our galaxy. In the far future, they may be
                absorbed into the main body.
                *Nearby neighbors--the Local Group of galaxies has a couple dozen
                members. The Milky Way and the Great Spiral Galaxy (Nebula before)
                in Andromeda are the largest members. The Local Group is a member of
                an even larger "super cluster" of many thousands of galaxies.
                Modern cosmology has a theory of uneven distribution of galaxies
                throughout the universe. Many millions of galaxies form "walls"
                or "shells" of matter around relatively empty "bubbles" that are
                millions of lightyears across.

                --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, sylvia gillion
                wrote:
                > Please help with describing the overall structure of the Milky Way
                Galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from one another.
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Do you Yahoo!?
                > All your favorites on one personal page – Try My Yahoo!





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                --------------------------------------------------------------------~->


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                <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wannabeastronomers/

                <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                wannabeastronomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
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              • Mark Watson
                Sylvia, One of my favorite pages in seeing the overall structure of the Milky Way from our Earthly vantage point in space can be found at the following URL:
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 29, 2004
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                  Sylvia,
                  One of my favorite pages in seeing the overall structure of the Milky
                  Way from our Earthly vantage point in space can be found at the
                  following URL:

                  http://home.arcor-online.de/axel.mellinger/

                  After many of the previous discriptions, it always helps to see it
                  for yourself. That panorama by Axel Mellinger is as good as it gets.

                  Also, consider this page on the orientation of our galaxy, and how it
                  appears relative to the celestial coordinate grid, i.e. the sky:

                  http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?act=ST&f=7&t=3263&hl=&

                  A general discription of our home galaxy can be found here:

                  http://ftp.seds.org/messier/more/mw.html

                  Also, to help you correlate what you see in Axel Mellinger's
                  panorama, to the structure of the galaxy itself, look at these series
                  of images, that I found on a Google search:

                  http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&lr=&q=Milky+Way+galaxy&btnG=Search

                  I hope that this information helps you.

                  Mark Watson,
                  The Columbus Astronomical Society,
                  Columbus, Ohio.


                  --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "sylviagillion92"
                  <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > can someone help me with describing the overall structure of the
                  > milky way galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from
                  > another.
                • Mark Watson
                  Sylvia, here is that last link again from that google search: http://tinyurl.com/4o8rn Good luck! Mark ... Milky ... it ... series ...
                  Message 8 of 11 , Nov 29, 2004
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                    Sylvia, here is that last link again from that google search:

                    http://tinyurl.com/4o8rn

                    Good luck!
                    Mark

                    --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Watson"
                    <tealock@m...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Sylvia,
                    > One of my favorite pages in seeing the overall structure of the
                    Milky
                    > Way from our Earthly vantage point in space can be found at the
                    > following URL:
                    >
                    > http://home.arcor-online.de/axel.mellinger/
                    >
                    > After many of the previous discriptions, it always helps to see it
                    > for yourself. That panorama by Axel Mellinger is as good as it gets.
                    >
                    > Also, consider this page on the orientation of our galaxy, and how
                    it
                    > appears relative to the celestial coordinate grid, i.e. the sky:
                    >
                    > http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?act=ST&f=7&t=3263&hl=&
                    >
                    > A general discription of our home galaxy can be found here:
                    >
                    > http://ftp.seds.org/messier/more/mw.html
                    >
                    > Also, to help you correlate what you see in Axel Mellinger's
                    > panorama, to the structure of the galaxy itself, look at these
                    series
                    > of images, that I found on a Google search:
                    >
                    > http://www.google.com/images?
                    hl=en&lr=&q=Milky+Way+galaxy&btnG=Search
                    >
                    > I hope that this information helps you.
                    >
                    > Mark Watson,
                    > The Columbus Astronomical Society,
                    > Columbus, Ohio.
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "sylviagillion92"
                    > <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > can someone help me with describing the overall structure of the
                    > > milky way galaxy and specify how the various regions differ from
                    > > another.
                  • sylviagillion92
                    Thank you for the information. I am in Astronomy at my college and we are now studing the Milky Way Galaxy. ... it ... gets. ... how ... act=ST&f=7&t=3263&hl=&
                    Message 9 of 11 , Nov 30, 2004
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                      Thank you for the information. I am in Astronomy at my college and we
                      are now studing the Milky Way Galaxy.
                      --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Watson"
                      <tealock@m...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Sylvia, here is that last link again from that google search:
                      >
                      > http://tinyurl.com/4o8rn
                      >
                      > Good luck!
                      > Mark
                      >
                      > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Watson"
                      > <tealock@m...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Sylvia,
                      > > One of my favorite pages in seeing the overall structure of the
                      > Milky
                      > > Way from our Earthly vantage point in space can be found at the
                      > > following URL:
                      > >
                      > > http://home.arcor-online.de/axel.mellinger/
                      > >
                      > > After many of the previous discriptions, it always helps to see
                      it
                      > > for yourself. That panorama by Axel Mellinger is as good as it
                      gets.
                      > >
                      > > Also, consider this page on the orientation of our galaxy, and
                      how
                      > it
                      > > appears relative to the celestial coordinate grid, i.e. the sky:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?
                      act=ST&f=7&t=3263&hl=&
                      > >
                      > > A general discription of our home galaxy can be found here:
                      > >
                      > > http://ftp.seds.org/messier/more/mw.html
                      > >
                      > > Also, to help you correlate what you see in Axel Mellinger's
                      > > panorama, to the structure of the galaxy itself, look at these
                      > series
                      > > of images, that I found on a Google search:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.google.com/images?
                      > hl=en&lr=&q=Milky+Way+galaxy&btnG=Search
                      > >
                      > > I hope that this information helps you.
                      > >
                      > > Mark Watson,
                      > > The Columbus Astronomical Society,
                      > > Columbus, Ohio.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, "sylviagillion92"
                      > > <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > can someone help me with describing the overall structure of
                      the
                      > > > milky way galaxy and specify how the various regions differ
                      from
                      > > > another.
                    • sylviagillion92
                      NO! But I am in school and we are know studying the Milky Way Galaxy. --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Tibb
                      Message 10 of 11 , Nov 30, 2004
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                        NO! But I am in school and we are know studying the Milky Way
                        Galaxy. --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Tibb
                        <jefftibb@y...> wrote:
                        > Is this a school assignment?
                        >
                        >
                        > --- sylvia gillion <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > Please help with describing the overall structure of
                        > > the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various
                        > > regions differ from one another.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ---------------------------------
                        > > Do you Yahoo!?
                        > > All your favorites on one personal page – Try My
                        > Yahoo!
                      • Jeff Tibb
                        Sylvia, It might be good for you to spend a little time exploring the links section of the group. We have quite a few interesting webpages listed there that
                        Message 11 of 11 , Nov 30, 2004
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                          Sylvia,

                          It might be good for you to spend a little time
                          exploring the links section of the group.

                          We have quite a few interesting webpages listed there
                          that should be able to give you very good background
                          information on this our home known as the Milky Way, a
                          Barred Spiral Galaxy.


                          --- sylviagillion92 <sylviagillion92@...> wrote:

                          >
                          > NO! But I am in school and we are know studying the
                          > Milky Way
                          > Galaxy. --- In wannabeastronomers@yahoogroups.com,
                          > Jeff Tibb
                          > <jefftibb@y...> wrote:
                          > > Is this a school assignment?
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- sylvia gillion <sylviagillion92@y...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > Please help with describing the overall
                          > structure of
                          > > > the Milky Way Galaxy and specify how the various
                          > > > regions differ from one another.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > ---------------------------------
                          > > > Do you Yahoo!?
                          > > > All your favorites on one personal page � Try
                          > My
                          > > Yahoo!
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
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