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Re: Recap

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  • nibblett2000
    Jeff, Love your mind. Before going on, it strikes me that I left out a crucial element of the equation: the value of b. For every 1000 KM/second of
    Message 1 of 3540 , Jun 7, 2001
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      Jeff,<br><br> Love your mind. Before going on, it
      strikes me that I left out a crucial element of the
      equation: the value of b. For every 1000 KM/second of
      escape velocity b increases by 0.0066335 in case you
      want to do your own 'plug and crank.' Speaking of
      plugging and cranking, would you have shift data for
      Sirius? It would be a way to refine b in at least one
      local case. I can convert Z to an ORV and l have the
      distance here. I had to stare at the Time of Flight
      equation for some time to convince myself of how it works.
      If b is zero and ORV is zero, the Time of Flight is
      zero and as the ORV gets large, the ToF goes to 1/m
      which is how it should behave. I have generally avoided
      using equations for the same reason that Hawkings did
      in 'Brief History ...", it cuts down
      readership.<br><br> You boiled down the discussion quite nicely when
      you said:<br><br>"One of the possible benefits of
      this research would be a confirmation (or denial) of
      the straight line relationship between red shifting
      and speed of recession. Therefore to shelve
      discussion of such research when there seems to be a
      realistic possibility that it will yield a confirmation (or
      denial) of the basic assumption used for long distance
      measurement would seem to be a big mistake."<br><br> Or at
      least half way you did. It is the interpretation of
      shift as movement that is the other half. One needs two
      good distances separated by time in order to discern
      line of sight movement. Unless one uses a tool like my
      spherometer, you can't get good distances. Unless you have
      angular measurements; then you can at least set an upper
      limit on the distance. Now if distance were linear with
      shift this subclass of type 1A SNe, ones with long
      periods and high shifts, would not, I offer, be something
      which would be of observable angular dimension. But the
      galaxies with which they are associated would. Are we
      given even that? Remember, we have 60 (or more) to
      choose from. From one side, we have quite a few good
      distances to galaxies of known types and angular dimension.
      This would amount to having some grip on their
      diameters. Even if galaxies' sizes are only roughly similar
      to one another (within a type), knowing that angular
      dimension falls off directly with distance gives a double
      check to compare distance vs. shift. This, too, would
      offer "a realistic possibility that it will yield a
      confirmation (or denial) of the basic assumption used for long
      distance measurement would seem to be a big mistake."
      Would you happen to know if this has been done? If not,
      could it be "If these objects are in fact far closer
      than assumed and this can be proven by other methods,
      then we have a new objection or a major problem with
      the Standard Model."?<br><br> Failing the 'angular
      dimension' test, we have nothing to go on except the
      expectation set which is the "Standard Model." At least not
      until we have another way to put distances to these
      objects. But what if we do get good distances and the
      times of flight correspond to the equation I presented
      in my last letter? What would that mean in terms of
      Astrophysics and the thousands of careers invested in the
      movement issue? Do you suppose that this would clear up
      immediately or not? A friend of mine was talking to an
      Astronomy professor who said "but if the BBT is wrong, then
      all bets are off."
    • jefftibb
      The SEDS site has a short list of Messier Marathon locations where people will congregate to count the Messier Objects. If you would like to join a
      Message 3540 of 3540 , Mar 13, 2002
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        The SEDS site has a short list of Messier
        Marathon locations where people will congregate to count
        the Messier Objects.<br><br>If you would like to join
        a group and do it check out this
        site:<br><br><a href=http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/xtra/marathon/mm2002.html target=new>http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/xtra/marathon/mm2002.html</a><br><br>Many will be happening this weekend.
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