Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [walesdna] The Lewis Line

Expand Messages
  • Janet Crain
    Actually, Philadelphia, PA is a major port city with a very long history. Many Welsh settlers/immigrants came directly there. The first with William Penn.
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Actually, Philadelphia, PA is a major port city with a very long
      history. Many Welsh settlers/immigrants came directly there. The
      first with William Penn.


      http://www.philaport.com/history.htm

      http://www.progenealogists.com/palproject/

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philidelphia

      <Quote>
      Welsh Immigration
      The were two major waves of Welsh immigration to Pennsylvania. The
      first, in William Penn's time, is recorded in Robert Proud's History
      of Pennsylvania: Among those early adventurers and settlers who
      arrived about this time, were also many from Wales of those called
      Ancient Britons, and mostly Quakers. Divers of those early Welsh
      settlers were persons of excellent and worthy character, and several
      of good education, family and estates. They had early purchased of
      the Proprietary, in England, forty thousand acres of Land." This
      land became the famous "Welsh Tract," which today includes Merion,
      Haverford, and Radnor.

      The 19th Century saw another influx of Welsh, as the industrial
      revolution drew thousands from the Rhonndda and Thymney valleys, the
      iron and steel center of Merthyr Tydfil, and the other industrial
      areas of South Wales, to work the mills, mines, and quarries of
      Pennsylvania. With them these Welsh workers brought their families,
      their skills, their language, and the great gift of song.

      These Welsh formed a number of Welsh Presbyterian churches in
      Philadelphia, which have since merged into the Arch Street
      Presbyterian Church, whose Welsh Guild is actively supported by the
      Welsh Society. Local telephone books show a vast number of Welsh
      names: Williams by the page, Evans, Davis, Jenkins, Powell, Lewis,
      Lloyd, Thomas, Hughes, and of course, Jones.

      <End Quote>

      http://members.macconnect.com/users/d/dalex/Pages/About.html





      >
      > So the key thing is the source documentation where this date of
      1680
      > comes from. What record(s) is that date culled from? He
      obviously did
      > not sail to Pennsylvania - he sailed to an American port. The
      natural
      > tendency is to guess New York, but do we know that for certain?
    • Janet Crain
      Actually, Philadelphia, PA is a major port city with a very long history. Many Welsh settlers/immigrants came directly there. The first with William Penn.
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Actually, Philadelphia, PA is a major port city with a very long
        history. Many Welsh settlers/immigrants came directly there. The
        first with William Penn.


        http://www.philaport.com/history.htm

        http://www.progenealogists.com/palproject/

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philidelphia

        <Quote>
        Welsh Immigration
        The were two major waves of Welsh immigration to Pennsylvania. The
        first, in William Penn's time, is recorded in Robert Proud's History
        of Pennsylvania: Among those early adventurers and settlers who
        arrived about this time, were also many from Wales of those called
        Ancient Britons, and mostly Quakers. Divers of those early Welsh
        settlers were persons of excellent and worthy character, and several
        of good education, family and estates. They had early purchased of
        the Proprietary, in England, forty thousand acres of Land." This
        land became the famous "Welsh Tract," which today includes Merion,
        Haverford, and Radnor.

        The 19th Century saw another influx of Welsh, as the industrial
        revolution drew thousands from the Rhonndda and Thymney valleys, the
        iron and steel center of Merthyr Tydfil, and the other industrial
        areas of South Wales, to work the mills, mines, and quarries of
        Pennsylvania. With them these Welsh workers brought their families,
        their skills, their language, and the great gift of song.

        These Welsh formed a number of Welsh Presbyterian churches in
        Philadelphia, which have since merged into the Arch Street
        Presbyterian Church, whose Welsh Guild is actively supported by the
        Welsh Society. Local telephone books show a vast number of Welsh
        names: Williams by the page, Evans, Davis, Jenkins, Powell, Lewis,
        Lloyd, Thomas, Hughes, and of course, Jones.

        <End Quote>

        http://members.macconnect.com/users/d/dalex/Pages/About.html





        >
        > So the key thing is the source documentation where this date of
        1680
        > comes from. What record(s) is that date culled from? He
        obviously did
        > not sail to Pennsylvania - he sailed to an American port. The
        natural
        > tendency is to guess New York, but do we know that for certain?
      • brian swann
        Dear Janet, All My wife, Eirwen, would be the first to point out that Rhonndda is spelt Rhondda and Thymney is spelt Rhymney. Apart from that - well done and
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.