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E3b in the British Isles

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  • ljcrain2
    Reposted from the ISOGG list. Abergele is an old Roman trading town, situated near the north Wales coast between the popular holiday resorts of Colwyn Bay and
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 2008

      Reposted from the ISOGG list.


      Abergele is an old Roman trading town, situated near the north Wales coast between the popular holiday resorts of Colwyn Bay and Rhyl, in the county borough of Conwy. Its northern suburb of Pensarn lies on the Irish Sea coast and is known for its beach, where it is claimed by some that a ghost ship has been sighted. Abergele and Pensarn railway station serves both resorts. Abergele is generally ignored due to the popularity of nearby Rhyl, Prestatyn, Colwyn Bay, Llandudno and Conwy.

      The town itself lies on the A55 road and is known for Gwrych Castle. The town is surrounded by wooded hillsides, which contain caves with rare lesser horseshoe bat. The highest hill is Moelfre Isaf (1038 ft) to the south of the town. There are also outstanding views from Cefn-yr-Ogof (669 ft), Tower Hill (587 ft) and Tan-y-Gopa.

      Abergele (including Pensarn) has a population of around 18,000 and is part of the Abergele/Rhyl/ Prestatyn urban area with a population of 64,026 (2001 census). Approximately 29% of Abergele has a significant knowledge of Welsh. The town also has a number of satellite villages such as Saint George, Betws yn Rhos, Rhyd-y-foel, Belgrano and Llanddulas.

      Recent genetic studies [1] on the y-chromosomes of men in Abergele have revealed that there is a substantial percentage of North African DNA in Abergele. Genetic marker e3b was found to average at 38.97% in male y-chromosomes in Abergele. Genetic marker e3b is found at its highest concentrations in North Africa at 75% but at much lower percentages in Northern Europe at less than 5%. The reason for the high levels of e3b in Abergele is most likely due to the heavy Roman presence in Abergele as most of the Romans that came to Britain did not come from Italy rather from other parts of the empire such as North Africa, the Middle East and eastern Europe. Above average levels of genetic marker e3b have been found in other towns in Britain that were known to have had a heavy Roman presence. So called "celtic" areas of the Iberian Peninsula have been found with high percentage of North African genes (highest among the ancestral isolated Pasie gos community in the Cantabrian mountains,46% and along other older chromosomes from Last Ice Age)in contrast to much southern and favourable areas for human habitation, like farming and Culturally rich Andalucia and mediterranean coasts.It is usually assumed that the Roman or Arab occupations left such imprint,but the remote location and reduced genes presence in more mainstream and likewise settled areas turn to indicate an older origin that parallels along the french and british coasts.Neolithic or older

    • brian swann
      Dear Linda I don t know what the Reference 1 is in this posting. But thee is a detailed article on the main ISOGG Journal of Genetic Genealogy on this subject
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 2008
      • dcleatond@aol.com
        I am in E3b1a with FTDNA 4 years ago, and I am aware of the Abergele news, as is the same with Chester Roman Soldiers Y DNA E3b1a too it seems, and also in
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 3, 2008
          I am in E3b1a  with FTDNA  4 years ago, and I am aware of the Abergele news, as is the same with Chester Roman Soldiers Y DNA E3b1a too it seems, and also in the Pristina area in Kosovo in the Balkans today - where the Roman Soldiers came from. See the E3b1a2 Research Paper by Steven C Bird at ISOGG for this Y DNA Haplogroup.
           
          There was a report in the Western Mail many years ago I remember , that a certain blood group found in North Wales was more often found in Arabs than in North Wales, that upset a few there!!  It was at the time Dr Bryan Sykes was conducting a blood group surveys there at some schools,etc, I think, and it was mentioned in his new book The Blood of the Isles.
           
          Dennis Cleaton   dcleatond@aol   Powys, Mid Wales. 
           
          (from  Montgomeryshire Cleatons of 1770, and before to 1573, and to 1414 in Shelve in Salop)
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