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The "twitch" concept in Wado?

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  • John Dodd
    I recently ran across an article that made reference to fast twitch muscles in contrast to slow twitch muscles -- but didn t make the distinction very
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 4, 2008
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      I recently ran across an article that made reference to "fast twitch"
      muscles in contrast to "slow twitch" muscles -- but didn't make the
      distinction very clear. Does anyone have any understanding of
      the "twitch" concept, particularly in a Wado context? Is there a
      similar construct in the Japanese language? If so, I wonder if the
      Master taught it. Thoughts?

      Best,
      John Dodd
      Rhode Island
    • Sensei J. Richard Kirkham B.Sc
      This was over 20 years ago in Kinese class but as I recall Fast twitch muscle fibers are for muscular strength, the ability to work. Slow twitch control
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 4, 2008
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        This was over 20 years ago in Kinese class but as I recall
         
        Fast twitch muscle fibers are for muscular strength, the ability to work. Slow twitch control muscular endurance, the ability to perform work over a period of time
         
        Does that help?
        Rick 

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        ----- Original Message ----
        From: John Dodd <wadojohnny@...>
        To: wadokarate@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, January 4, 2008 3:28:08 PM
        Subject: [Wado Forum] The "twitch" concept in Wado?

        I recently ran across an article that made reference to "fast twitch"
        muscles in contrast to "slow twitch" muscles -- but didn't make the
        distinction very clear.  Does anyone have any understanding of
        the "twitch" concept, particularly in a Wado context?  Is there a
        similar construct in the Japanese language?  If so, I wonder if the
        Master taught it.  Thoughts?

        Best,
        John Dodd
        Rhode Island



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      • ROBERT CAMPBELL
        John, over simplified, a marathon runner would have slow twitch muscle fibres, a shot-putter fast twitch: It s to do with the training effect on contractile
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 5, 2008
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          John, over simplified, a marathon runner would have slow twitch muscle fibres, a shot-putter fast twitch: It's to do with the training effect on contractile tissue, Chickens don't fly, they have white meat on the breast, slow twitch:
          They run around lots, brown/red meat on the thighs.
          The wado context is the same as for any other sport: it's not a measure/description of reaction time, so there won't be a special Budo mention,

          John Dodd <wadojohnny@...> wrote:
          I recently ran across an article that made reference to "fast twitch"
          muscles in contrast to "slow twitch" muscles -- but didn't make the
          distinction very clear. Does anyone have any understanding of
          the "twitch" concept, particularly in a Wado context? Is there a
          similar construct in the Japanese language? If so, I wonder if the
          Master taught it. Thoughts?

          Best,
          John Dodd
          Rhode Island




          Rob Campbell 6th dan
          World Silver medallist Weapons
          Chief Instructor, British Budokan Association
          Former WKA National Kata Manager
          www.blackpoolmartialarts.com
        • Taylor Hayden
          ... It has been a long time since I studied the concept of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers. So, this may not be the most current information but here is
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 5, 2008
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            >I recently ran across an article that made reference to "fast twitch"
            >muscles in contrast to "slow twitch" muscles -- but didn't make the
            >distinction very clear. Does anyone have any understanding of
            >the "twitch" concept, particularly in a Wado context? Is there a
            >similar construct in the Japanese language? If so, I wonder if the
            >Master taught it. Thoughts?
            >
            >Best,
            >John
            Dodd
             
             
            It has been a long time since I studied the concept of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers.  So, this may not be the most current information but here is what I recall on the subject.  Skeletal muscles are composed of both fast and slow twitch muscle fibers.  Fast twitch fibers, as the name implies, contract more quickly than slow twitch fibers.  The ratio of fast to slow twitch fibers in a given muscle is determined at birth and cannot be changed through exercise.  However, the fast twitch fibers present can be exercised and strengthened resulting in a "faster" overall muscle contraction.  Some people are born with a higher percentage of fast twitch fibers in their muscles and are therefore naturally more explosive in their movements.  Probably all world class sprinters have a higher percentage of fast twitch fibers in their leg muscles than does the general population.  In contrast, marathon runners probably have a higher percentage of slow twitch fibers.  Fast twitch fibers are strengthened by exercising explosively - such as bench jumping.  Or, in the case of karate, kicking and punching as quickly as possible.  For more current information I am sure a search on the internet will prove rewarding.
             
            T Hayden
          • triedhammer
            Here is a bit of background information on the twitch fibers It has also been a little bit since my physiology classes, but I think this information is
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 6, 2008
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              Here is a bit of background information on the "twitch fibers" It
              has also been a little bit since my physiology classes, but I think
              this information is accurate.

              As far as training, there are plenty of articles that have noted
              different training regimes that change and possibly dictate the
              amount of each type of fiber the athlete will develop.

              Hope this helps clear up some questions:

              In general muscle fiber types can be broken down into two main types:
              slow twitch (Type I) muscle fibers and fast twitch (Type II) muscle
              fibers. Fast twitch fibers can be further categorized into Type IIa
              and Type IIb fibers.

              Slow Twitch (Type I)
              The slow muscles are more efficient at using oxygen to generate more
              fuel (ATP) for continuous, extended muscle contractions over a long
              time. They fire more slowly than fast twitch fibers and can go for a
              long time before they fatigue. Therefore, slow twitch fibers are
              great at helping athletes run marathons and bicycle for hours.

              Fast Twitch (Type II)
              Fast twitch muscles do not use oxygen (anaerobic)-they use glycogen.
              Reactions using glycogen require anaerobic enzymes to produce power.
              Glycogen is stored in the muscles and liver and is synthesized by the
              body using carbohydrates. Since these muscles use metabolism to
              create fuel, they are much better at generating short bursts of
              strength or speed than slow muscles. However, they fatigue more
              quickly. Fast twitch fibers generally produce the same amount of
              force per contraction as slow muscles, but they get their name
              because they are able to fire more rapidly. Having more fast twitch
              fibers can be an asset to a sprinter since she needs to quickly
              generate a lot of force.

              Type IIa Fibers
              Also known as intermediate fast-twitch fibers; they can use both
              aerobic and anaerobic metabolism almost equally to create energy.
              They are a combination of Type I and Type II muscle fibers.

              Type IIb Fibers
              These fast twitch fibers use anaerobic metabolism to create energy
              and are the "classic" fast twitch muscle fibers that excel at
              producing quick, powerful bursts of speed. This muscle fiber has the
              highest rate of contraction (rapid firing), but also a much faster
              rate of fatigue and can't last as long before it needs rest.


              Sincerely,
              Tanya

              --- In wadokarate@yahoogroups.com, "Sensei J. Richard Kirkham B.Sc"
              <tutor2000@...> wrote:
              >
              > This was over 20 years ago in Kinese class but as I recall
              >
              > Fast twitch muscle fibers are for muscular strength, the ability to
              work. Slow twitch control muscular endurance, the ability to perform
              work over a period of time
              >
              > Does that help?
              > Rick
              > This signature file is a legal part of this message and is not to
              be removed or altered
              > Martial Arts Business Package Martial Arts Ebooks Books DVDs and
              Videos New Submission 12-19-2007
              > Receive Submit and use for Content Martial Arts and Fitness
              Articles and Quick Tips
              > Self_Defense_Tips-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > http://kirkhamsebooks.com/MartialArts/index.htm
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message ----
              > From: John Dodd <wadojohnny@...>
              > To: wadokarate@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Friday, January 4, 2008 3:28:08 PM
              > Subject: [Wado Forum] The "twitch" concept in Wado?
              >
              > I recently ran across an article that made reference to "fast
              twitch"
              > muscles in contrast to "slow twitch" muscles -- but didn't make the
              > distinction very clear. Does anyone have any understanding of
              > the "twitch" concept, particularly in a Wado context? Is there a
              > similar construct in the Japanese language? If so, I wonder if the
              > Master taught it. Thoughts?
              >
              > Best,
              > John Dodd
              > Rhode Island
              >
              >
              >
              > To Subscribe, send a blank message to: wadokarate-subscribe@...
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: wadokarate@...
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: wadokarate-unsubscribe@...
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              >
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