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[vt100] Welcome and thanks

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  • Bill Rice
    Steve, Thanks for the informative post. Will definitely need to pick your brains so to speak in the upcoming months. Your training schedule sounds like one I
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 7 12:47 PM
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      Steve,
      Thanks for the informative post. Will definitely need to pick your
      brains so to speak in the upcoming months. Your training schedule
      sounds like one I can use as the "Maine" group is planning to run in
      the hills of western Maine to train for Vermont. So will try and
      duplicate an 18-20 mile course to use with plenty of both up and down
      hills. Do not think I will have any crew support so any advice for
      drop bags greatly appreciated. Am planning the usual, i.e., shoes,
      shirts, drink mix, etc. Anything a "newbie" really needs that we
      normally forget to include?
      See you on the trails.
      Bill
    • Steve Pero
      Hi Bill... Pick my brain all You want, but just remember, I m not the experienced one here...I think Frank and Jeff have done lots more than I...as a matter of
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 7 2:45 PM
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        Hi Bill...

        Pick my brain all You want, but just remember, I'm not the experienced
        one here...I think Frank and Jeff have done lots more than I...as a
        matter of fact, Jeff has done more just last year than most of the
        population on the face of the earth!

        But the main thing to do in Maine ;-)...is just powerwalk up the hills.
        Hills as long as You can get and then run down somewhat hard to work
        the quads.
        I remember at Vermont in '98 (my first 100), the hardest thing to do
        was to get myself to run the downhills after mile 80. The quads are
        sore and walking is just so easy, but you just have to push through the
        pain and jog down...it really will make a difference.

        Another thing...there are so many aid stations that You really can't
        spend too much time at them all. Pick out a couple of biggies, like
        CTB's#1&2 and plan on staying there for five minutes or so to just
        regroup, change shoes, eat or whatever...just take a breath and relax a
        bit before hitting the road again.
        If you stay at every aid station for just one minute, You've lost an
        hour and 12 minutes right there off you're time. Most of the aid
        stations, I just grab something to eat while the volunteers filled my
        bottle that I carried, and moved on, eating while walking up the
        road...and never sit down...beware the chair!

        You really can get by without a crew because You can leave a drop bag
        just about everywhere...but if You leave too many it can get confusing,
        so what I did is leave one every 20 miles with something special to
        eat...something to look forward to, whether it be an Ensure or maybe
        just a brownie or something...plus whatever is neccessary, like Succeed
        cap replacements, drink replacements, socks (I like fresh socks every
        20 miles)...whatever You like, put it in there.

        Good conversation...lets' keep it up, I'm getting psyched!
        ttyl,
        Steve Pero
        peros@...

        PS: Maybe I can drive "down" Maine someday and join You for a run. Do
        You know Craig WIlson? He's a friend of mine...
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