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VSX and the AAVSO validation file

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  • martin_piers_nicholson
    The VSX database contains many variable stars not listed in the AAVSO validation file. What happens when data on these stars is submitted to AAVSO? Using MX
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 27, 2007
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      The VSX database contains many variable stars not listed in the AAVSO
      validation file. What happens when data on these stars is submitted to
      AAVSO?

      Using MX VUL as the example.

      Recent observations :-
      http://www.aavso.org/cgi-bin/newql.pl?name=MX%20VUL&output=html

      Create a light curve :-
      Sorry, we don't have observations for MX VUL in our database.

      Does this get picked up when the validation file is updated? Is
      updating done at regular intervals or as/when data on previously
      unlisted stars is submitted?
    • arne
      ... The validation file is a list of all stars for which we currently have data in the AAVSO International Database. For a new star, the observer usually gives
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 27, 2007
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        martin_piers_nicholson wrote:
        > The VSX database contains many variable stars not listed in the AAVSO
        > validation file. What happens when data on these stars is submitted to
        > AAVSO?
        >
        > Using MX VUL as the example.
        >
        > Recent observations :-
        > http://www.aavso.org/cgi-bin/newql.pl?name=MX%20VUL&output=html
        >
        > Create a light curve :-
        > Sorry, we don't have observations for MX VUL in our database.
        >
        > Does this get picked up when the validation file is updated? Is
        > updating done at regular intervals or as/when data on previously
        > unlisted stars is submitted?
        >
        The validation file is a list of all stars for which we currently
        have data in the AAVSO International Database. For a new star,
        the observer usually gives a Harvard Designation of 9999+99
        when submitting his/her data. Sometime later, a human looks
        at these 9999+99 entries, assigns a Harvard Designation, adds
        the star to the validation file, and modifies the database entries
        to reflect the proper HD. Until then, you can always find the data by
        searching on 9999+99, as the HD is the primary search key. However,
        searching for 9999+99 returns *all* stars for which we do not have
        a Harvard Designation, so while QL is ok, the light curve generator
        will look pretty funky.

        The validation file was originally designed for internal use, as
        it contains more information than just the HD and the name;
        often notes for HQ staff for processing, discovery notes, period,
        range, etc. However, its usefulness has decreased and it will be
        most likely abandoned this summer in favor of a direct VSX
        access for the information, assuming that we can get some
        VSX issues resolved.
        Arne
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